Accessibility links

Democrats Welcome Run Against Trump


Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton, left, and Senator Bernie Sanders, Independent-Vermont, take the stage before a Democratic presidential primary debate at the University of Michigan-Flint, Sunday, March 6, 2016, in Flint, Michigan.

Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton, left, and Senator Bernie Sanders, Independent-Vermont, take the stage before a Democratic presidential primary debate at the University of Michigan-Flint, Sunday, March 6, 2016, in Flint, Michigan.


Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders, the Democratic Party candidates for the U.S. presidential nomination, say they welcome opposing Donald Trump in the general election.

Both candidates were asked during the debate Sunday in Flint, Michigan, how they expect to compete against Trump.

Clinton addressed the question by saying she thinks “that Donald Trump’s bigotry, his bullying, his bluster, are not going to wear well on the American people.”

Trump’s campaign slogan is “Make America Great Again.”

Clinton is ready to challenge Trump’s slogan.

“You know, I don't think we need to make America great again,” Clinton said. “America didn't stop being great. We have to make it whole again.”

Sanders, a senator from Vermont, told the CNN panel and the audience: “I think we can beat Trump. … Our campaign is generating an enormous amount of excitement. I think we are exciting working class people, young people who are prepared to stand up and demand that we have a government that represents all of us.”

Clinton and Sanders also debated the water crisis in Flint. Pipes in the city water system were lined with lead and the water dangerous and toxic. Both Clinton and Sanders demanded Michigan Governor Rick Snyder should resign.

The candidates also debated gun control, trade agreements, environment and mental health.

Clinton leads Sanders in the number of delegates who have said they will vote for her at the party convention. The convention is where the candidate is decided by the delegates.

Clinton has at least 1,123 delegates. Sanders can claim 484 delegates.

A total of 2,383 delegates are needed to claim the Democratic nomination. Close to 4,000 Democratic delegates are available.

I’m Jim Dresbach.

VOANews reported on this story. Jim Dresbach adapted the report for Learning English. Kathleen Struck was the editor.

We want to hear from you. Write to us in the Comments Section or visit our Facebook page.

________________________________________________________________

Words in This Story

bigotryn. acts that shows a person who strongly and unfairly dislikes other people or ideas

bullyingv. to frighten, hurt, or threaten a smaller or weaker person

blustern. voice or personality that blows loudly or violently

slogann. a word or saying that is easy to remember and is used by a group or business to increase recognition

toxicadj. containing harmful or poisonous substances

convention - n. a meeting or conference

Show comments

XS
SM
MD
LG