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Travelers Visit Disputed Areas of the South China Sea


FILE - This file aerial view taken on July 27, 2012 shows part of the city of Sansha on the island of Yongxing, also known as Woody island in the disputed Paracel chain. (AFP PHOTO)


Countries around the disputed South China Sea are letting travelers visit small islands in the Sea to strengthen territorial claims. But experts say the practice will not be able to continue for a long time because it does not make economic sense.

In early March, a cruise ship from China took 300 people to the Paracel Islands. Vietnam, which has also claimed the islets, criticized the decision. The first cruise ship to visit the islands from China did so in 2013.

FILE - In this Sept. 14, 2014 photo, Chinese tourists disembark from an inflatable boat upon arrival in Quanfu island, part of the Paracels.

FILE - In this Sept. 14, 2014 photo, Chinese tourists disembark from an inflatable boat upon arrival in Quanfu island, part of the Paracels.

In December, a Chinese airline began charter flights from the southern city of Haikou to Woody Island, the biggest in the Paracels.

Malaysia lets tourists visit one of the islands it claims in the Spratly Island chain. Taiwan has also considered doing so in another part of the sea.

Frederick Burke is a partner at the international law firm Baker & McKenzie in Ho Chi Minh City. He says people from Vietnam are visiting the disputed Spratly Islands to strengthen their country’s claim to the chain.

Burke said they go out on boats “to see what all the excitement is about.”

He added, “I suppose from a marine biology perspective some of those reefs are the fishing hatcheries for the entire sea, and I’m sure there are some interesting destinations for divers."

Traditional tourism is still rare

But experts say most of those who travel to the sea will be patriots and adventure-seekers. They say the travelers must be prepared to travel a long distance, visit a place with little infrastructure and risk being caught in a conflict with another country.

Christian de Guzman is the vice president and senior credit officer of Moody’s in Singapore. He also believes countries are using tourism to strengthen their territorial claims.

However, he says tourism to the sea probably has little economic benefit.

Malaysia has let foreign and domestic tourists visit Pulau Layang Layang in the Spratly chain since 1989. The islet is also known as Swallow Reef. It is used by the Malaysian navy. It has a 53-room diving resort, which organizes chartered flights from Malaysian Borneo 300 kilometers away.

In 2015, a Philippine military general told reporters that his country would begin developing Pagasa, one of the nine Spratly islands it claims.

A FFILE - Filipinos conduct a flag raising ceremony at Pag-asa Island in the Spratly Islands

A FFILE - Filipinos conduct a flag raising ceremony at Pag-asa Island in the Spratly Islands

Brunei, Malaysia, Vietnam and the Philippines claim parts of the sea, which is highly valued because of its fisheries, marine shipping lanes and undersea reserves of oil and gas. China and Taiwan claim almost the entire 3.5 million-square-kilometer sea.

Most new construction is by the Chinese

China has quickly expanded territory in the sea since 2010. It has created at least 3,000 acres of land so that once-tiny reefs can be used for military operations. Its ships also sail regularly in waters claimed by other countries.

There is little infrastructure on many of the islets, except to support military operations.

Pulau Layang Layang is the only disputed South China Sea islet with a large resort.

There are about 200 people on Taiwan-controlled Taiping Island. Most work for the coast guard.

A member of the Taiwan coast guard shows the solar panels used for electrical power to visiting media on Taiping island, also known as Itu Aba, in the Spratly archipelago, roughly 1600 kms. (1000 miles) south of Taiwan, March 23, 2016.

A member of the Taiwan coast guard shows the solar panels used for electrical power to visiting media on Taiping island, also known as Itu Aba, in the Spratly archipelago, roughly 1600 kms. (1000 miles) south of Taiwan, March 23, 2016.

The 1,000 people living in Sansha, a Chinese city on Woody Island, have a bank, hospital and a large food store. But drinking water was still being brought in as of last year. China hopes to attract tourists to the island for diving, surfing and weddings.

I’m Dorothy Gundy.

Correspondent Ralph Jennings reported this story from Taipei. Christoper Jones Cruise adapted the report for Learning English. Kelly Jean Kelly was the editor.

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Words in This Story

islet - n. small island

charter - adj. temporary use

chain - n. a series or group of something that are connected

perspective - n. a way of thinking or understanding

hatchery - n. a place where people raise chicken, fish ... from eggs

destinations - n. a place to which a person is going

resort - n. a place where people go for vacations

reserve - n. a supply of something that is stored

entire - adj. complete or full

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