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#Mizzou and the #MillionStudentMarch


 University of Missouri student protesters, led by a group called Concerned Student 1950 -- a reference to the year the university first admitted black students -- block access to Mel Carnahan quad on the campus in Columbia, Missouri, Nov. 9, 2015.

University of Missouri student protesters, led by a group called Concerned Student 1950 -- a reference to the year the university first admitted black students -- block access to Mel Carnahan quad on the campus in Columbia, Missouri, Nov. 9, 2015.


#Mizzou

A student's threat on the mobile application Yik Yak to “shoot every black person I see” kept the University of Missouri and #Mizzou as trending topics on social media again.

Campus police called the student’s posts “terrorist threats.”

Meanwhile, “Ithaca College” was a top Google search Thursday, after students there protested racism on their campus.

Students from Ithaca College said they were inspired by the actions of #ConcernedStudent1950 and called for college president Tom Rochon to resign.

At least 1,000 Ithaca College students took part in a “solidarity walk out” Wednesday.

#MillionStudentMarch

Across America, students were staging walkouts for other reasons, too.

Students at 110 colleges across the United States walked out of their classrooms to protest the high costs of loans and the price of public education in the U.S. The #MillionStudentMarch trended worldwide on Twitter Thursday.

The Million Student March website says “Education should be free. The United States is the richest country in the world, yet students have to take on crippling debt in order to get a college education.”

On social media, the movement received support as well as negative feedback.

The Washington Post explained how Democratic candidate for president Bernie Sanders helped inspire the #MillionStudentMarch.

The Vermont senator said in an interview last June, “If a million young people march on Washington [and say] to the Republican leadership, ‘we know what’s going on, and you better vote to deal with student debt. You better vote to make public universities and colleges tuition free,’ that’s when it will happen.”

On Thursday, Senator Sanders again Tweeted his thoughts on debt-free higher education. He said, "Higher education is a right. We must fight to ensure that every American can go to college without living in debt."

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