October 23, 2014 17:50 UTC

Business

French Economist Wins Nobel for Studies in Market Rules

Jean Tirole of France won the 2014 Noble Prize in economics for his work on regulating markets influence by only a few big companies.

10/18/2014
Economists have studied how markets work for a long time. Generally, they work well. But markets do not always perform as expected. Jean Tirole of France won the Nobel Prize in Economics for studying why markets are imperfect, or inefficient, and what governments can do to regulate them. More

Audio Chinese Firm Pays Record Price for Waldorf Astoria

The $1.95 billion deal with Anbang Insurance Group is the highest price ever paid for a U.S. hotel. Other Chinese buyers have also spent $22 billion on real estate investment in the U.S. for the twelve-month period ending in March 2014. In the 1980s, Japanese companies also bought US properties.

Video Long Drought Affects Farmers in Southwestern US

Parts of the southwestern American states of Texas and Oklahoma have experienced severe dry weather for several years. This drought has affected the growth of cotton and grains. The governor of Oklahoma says the state has suffered two billion dollars in agricultural losses since 2011.

Audio Vietnam Seeks to Build High-Tech Exports

Vietnam may not have its own center for high-tech businesses like Silicon Valley in the U.S. state of California, but the country is becoming more important in the worldwide manufacturing system. The country has even attracted major technology companies like Microsoft, Samsung, and Intel.

Audio Ebola Outbreak Also Harms Economies

World Bank President Jim Yong Kim says the Ebola outbreak threatens West African economies noting other outbreaks that have created high economic losses.

Video New Beer Made From Old Bone

What happens when a beer-drinking bone digger and a creative scientist team up? Beer made with a really, really, really old ingredient. That’s what happens.

Audio Rich People Get Their Own Facebook

A new social media site, Netropolitan, promises to be more exclusive by only permitting people who are rich to join. Users must pay $9,000 to join. This includes a $6,000 entry fee plus $3,000 for the yearly membership fee.

Audio Safety Is a Concern in Turkey's Construction Boom

Istanbul is suddenly the skyscraper capital of Europe, thanks to a national construction boom. But recent construction accidents in the country have many people angry about worker safety.

Audio Scientists Discover Secrets of Coffee

Researchers have mapped the genes of a coffee plant. They may be able to use the information to create a plant without caffeine, improving the taste of the drink for people who now drink the decaffeinated version, which some say does not taste as good. | As It Is

Video Chinese Publisher Benefits Houston's Asian Population

Wea Lee started Southern News Group in Houston 35 years ago. Lee's first business was printing a newspaper for the small Chinese community. He now owns newspapers, a television station, the International Trade Center in Houston’s Chinatown and is a part owner of a local bank.

Audio Rwanda Opens Biggest Solar Power Plant in East Africa

The plant is in Agahozo Shalom village in eastern Rwanda. The plant is the first of its kind in the area.

Audio 'Exploding' Lake to Provide Power in Rwanda

A U.S. company will remove methane gas from Lake Kivu for use as a major supply of electricity. Two million people living nearby could use the power.

Audio Asian Insect Threatens Florida's Citrus Industry

Florida’s citrus industry is facing serious threats from an Asian insect. The insect can be a carrier of bacteria that attack citrus trees. The spread of the bacteria shows the danger of bringing non-native organisms to America soil.

Audio Alibaba Seeks to Raise Billions in IPO

The Chinese online company could raise $20 billion by selling stock to the public in the U.S. The company holds an 80 percent share of China’s online market.

Audio US, Japan to Connect with Fiber-Optic Cable

Work on $300 million project to begin immediately; five Asian companies and Google involved in the project, which will link US West Coast and Japan. | In the News

Audio Diners Increase Business with Healthy Food

Restaurants called “diners” can be found throughout the United States. They make simple, low-cost food. But traditional diner food is often unhealthy. One group of diners is cooking healthier food for their customers and, surprisingly, they love it.

Audio Learning to Grow Traditional Foods in Uganda

The "slow food" movement is growing in the Western world, but not in Africa. Group works to help people in Uganda and other countries grow local, healthy food. | Agriculture Report

Audio “Green Loans” Help Kenya’s Farmers

A new company offers a new kind of loan, and teaches farmers how to protect the soil and feed the nation. And it protects them from “loan sharks” | As It Is

Audio Tobacco Plant to Make Jet Fuel

Boeing, South African Airways, Dutch biofuel company working together to make biofuel; tobacco farmers may have a new market for their crop | As It Is

Audio Trophy Hunting Is Big Business in South Africa

Hunting big game in South Africa is big business. Some argue that this helps the animal populations. Others are not so sure. The issue is anything but black and white.

Learn with The News

  • Armed officers approach Parliament Hilll following a shooting incident in Ottawa, Oct. 22, 2014.

    Video Deadly Attack Shocks Canada's Capital

    Also, Kurdish lawmakers in Iraq vote to send Kurdish forces to the Syrian town of Kobani. China said 43 people tested for possible Ebola infection do not have the virus. Russia and Ukraine are still working to reach an agreement on Ukraine's payments for natural Gas. More

  • FBI Director James Comey speaks about the impact of technology on law enforcement, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2014, at Brookings Institution in Washington.

    Audio Apple, FBI Battle Over Privacy Rules

    Apple recently said it was increasing security settings on its latest operating system for the company’s wireless devices. Apple said its new encryption rules are designed to protect users from search and seizure of their iPhones. But the changes are of concern to federal investigators. More

  • Survivors of the Ebola virus pose for a picture outside a clinic near Tubmanburg, October 15, 2014. A total of 4,493 people have died from the world's worst Ebola outbreak on record as of Oct. 12, statistics released by the World Health Organization showe

    Audio Ebola Survivors Speak Out about Their Experience

    The number of Ebola cases continues rising. But there is some hope for those who survive the disease. Recently, a conference for Ebola survivors was held for the first time in eastern Sierra Leone. The goal was to offer advice to survivors and increase understanding of the disease. More

  • Men convicted of drug related crimes hear the public announcement for their death sentences in Shenzhen, China, on August 15, 1996.  (AP Photo/Vincent Yu, File)

    Audio Activists: China Executed 2,400 People in 2013

    The number of executions in China is lower than in earlier years. However, it is more than three times higher than the number of executions in the rest of the world combined. That information comes from Amnesty International. Death penalty numbers are a state secret in China. More

  • Ebola-CDC brief

    Audio  WHO: Ebola Vaccine Could Be in Use by January

    Also, student leaders in Hong Kong not satisfied with first talks with government officials. North Korea has releases one of three American prisoners. And South African Olympian Oscar Pistorius has been sentenced to five years in prison for the deadly shooting of his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp. More

Featured Stories

  • Audio Iron Ships Clash at Sea

    The American Civil War was fought not only on land, but at sea. In 1862, Confederate and Union forces fought a new kind of navy battle in waters off Hampton Roads, Virginia. It was the first battle between iron ships. On the Confederate side was a ship called the Virginia. | The Making of a Nation More

  • Audio San Francisco Radio Stations Ban Lorde's 'Royals'

    The California baseball team, San Francisco Giants, is playing the Kansas City Royals for the 2014 Major League Baseball championship, the World Series. Two radio stations in San Francisco banned the hit song "Royals." In return, another station in Kansas City chose to play the song once every hour. More

  • A neurovascular unit on a chip being developed by Vanderbilt University researchers. (Vanderbilt University Photo/John Wikswo)

    Video Scientists Design Chips to Act Like Human Organs

    Testing new drugs for safety and effectiveness is a costly process in the United States. It also can take a lot of time. Some scientists are now designing silicon computer chips that act like human organs. The scientists think they have found a way to make the process faster and more economical. More

  • Brain Resource Infographic

    Audio Dealing with Distractions and Overreactions

    Five million American children and teenagers have Attention Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder, commonly known as ADHD. ADHD makes it difficult - if not impossible - to stay with a duty until it is complete. Katherine Ellison knows the problem well. | Health Report More

  • Millions of years of history, which can be found on the ocean floor, are collected and analyzed at the Core Repository in New York.

    Video Scientists Create New Maps of Ocean Floor

    Until recently, scientists had mapped only about 20 percent of the sea floor. But our knowledge of the deep seas is changing because of information from satellites. Scientists have produced a new map that provides a detailed picture of the oceans. More

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