November 01, 2014 00:57 UTC

Science & Technology

Questions for NASA after Rocket Explosion

Orbital Sciences Antares Launch

10/29/2014
An unmanned privately-owned rocket bringing supplies to the International Space Station exploded seconds after launch Tuesday night. The accident did not cause any injuries on the ground. However, it has raised questions about efforts by the US space agency NASA to use private companies. More

Photogallery Small Organisms in Deep Sea Rocks Eat Methane

The gas methane has been linked to rising temperatures on Earth. But methane does not stay in the atmosphere as long as another “greenhouse gas” -- carbon dioxide. Scientists say both gases trap heat from the sun. They prevent heat from escaping into outer space.

Video WWF: Health of Planet Is at Risk

World Wildlife Fund says more than half of the world’s wildlife population has died. The report provides information about more than 10,000 animal populations called “vertebrate species,” or animals with backbones -- like fish, birds, mammals, amphibians and reptiles.

Audio Apple, FBI Battle Over Privacy Rules

Apple recently said it was increasing security settings on its latest operating system for the company’s wireless devices. Apple said its new encryption rules are designed to protect users from search and seizure of their iPhones. But the changes are of concern to federal investigators.

Video Scientists Design Chips to Act Like Human Organs

Testing new drugs for safety and effectiveness is a costly process in the United States. It also can take a lot of time. Some scientists are now designing silicon computer chips that act like human organs. The scientists think they have found a way to make the process faster and more economical.

Audio Fiber Optic Cable Measures Antarctic Ice Melt

Antarctica is covered with ice that extends past the land and floats on the sea in thick shelves. But those ice shelves are melting quickly. As they melt, the sea level rises, increasing the risk of damaging floods.

Quiz - Scientists Design Chips to Act Like Human Organs

This quiz will help you check your reading and listening ability - be sure you watch both of the videos and read the article before you start the quiz.

Audio Is the Cheetah Fast Enough to Survive?

In 1900, about 100,000 cheetahs lived in the world. Today there are only 10,000 of the animals. Just about everyone knows that cheetahs are fast. Some studies have measured their speed at about 95 kilometers an hour over distances of about 366 meters.

Audio Ebola Drugs Put on Fast Track

Researchers are hurrying to develop effective treatments and vaccines for Ebola. The disease has killed more than 4,500 people. The US government’s Food and Drug Administration can speed up approval of drug treatments when faced with a deadly disease like Ebola.

Video Scientists Create New Maps of Ocean Floor

Until recently, scientists had mapped only about 20 percent of the sea floor. But our knowledge of the deep seas is changing because of information from satellites. Scientists have produced a new map that provides a detailed picture of the oceans.

Video Spacecraft Sends 'Tantalizing' Information from Mars

Scientists are excited by data from the first three weeks of the spacecraft’s exploration of the Red Planet’s upper atmosphere. | As It Is

Audio How to Weather a Solar Storm

The sun’s energy creates light and heat. It also produces charged electrical particles and magnetic fields. The sun can keep the earth nice and warm and helps our crops to grow. But a sudden burst of that solar energy can cause a power outage.

Audio US Satellites to Help Southeast Asia with Climate Change

Satellite imagery from the American space agency is expected to soon begin helping about 60 million people in the Lower Mekong River Basin of Southeast Asia.

Audio Forgotten Speeches Come Alive on YouTube

Astronauts, world leaders and many others spoke at the University of California, Los Angeles, in the 1960s and early 1970s. Many of these speeches were recorded, and are now available on the YouTube website.

Audio Three Scientists Win Nobel Prize for Brain Research

American-born British Scientist John O'Keefe and Norwegians May-Britt Moser and Edvard Moser won the Nobel Prize in medicine. They discovered how the brain knows the body’s location.

Quiz on Researchers Work on 3-D Printing of Living Tissue

See how well you understand the story by taking this quiz.

Audio Scientists Predict More Severe Storms Worldwide

As the world's population grows, extreme weather conditions affect more and more people. Many scientists predict stronger storms, flooding and droughts in the future.

Audio Young Cameroon Engineer Invents Cardiopad

Cameroonian Arthur Zang invented the device when he was 24-years-old. The Cardiopad is a touch screen medial tablet that enables heart examinations to be performed.

Video Citizen-Scientists Take Control of Old Satellite

Former NASA engineer helps group get information from a satellite that was launched in the 1970s and had been silent for years; giving an old satellite a new mission. | As It Is

Audio Spinosaurus, a Swimming Dinosaur Bigger than T-Rex

Could a creature that lived 95 million years ago travel from what is now North Africa to Europe and even to North America? The new research provides evidence that Spinosaurus was such a creature. It could also hunt for meat on land and water.

Learn with The News

  • FILE - Chinese Premier Li Keqiang, right, walks past Chinese President Xi Jinping as they arrive to the Monument to the People's Heroes during a ceremony marking Martyr’s Day at Tiananmen Square in Beijing, China, Sept. 30, 2014.

    Audio China’s Constitution Receives New Attention

    The constitution took effect in the early 1980s, when the Communist Party was opening up the country economically. Now China is at a new crossroads. Observers say it is reaching for a new economic growth model. Chinese officials will promise to defend its rules when they take office. | In The News More

  • Video More US Hispanic Women Convert to Islam

    Latinos are one of the fastest growing groups in the Muslim religion. The Pew Research Center says about six percent of American Muslims are Latino. And women make up a little more than half of the new converts -- the people who have changed their religion to Islam. More

  • This image released by USCIS shows a sample of the front of the redesigned green card carried by foreign-born residents living permanently in the U.S. The Homeland Security Department is issuing the redesigned "green card" that is stacked with safety feat

    Audio US 'Green Card Lottery' Ending November 3

    State Department’s Diversity Visa program closes November 3rd. Millions of people have entered the program, hoping to win a visa. But only 50,000 are chosen. 5,000 more are available under the Nicaraguan and Central America Relief Act. The green card lottery closes on Monday. | As It Is More

  • A convoy of peshmerga vehicles is escorted by Turkish Kurds on their way to the Turkish-Syrian border, in Kiziltepe near the southeastern city of Mardin October 29, 2014

    Audio Iraqi Kurdish Fighters Enter Kobani

    Also in the news, Burkina Faso ends efforts to extend its presidential term limit after protests in the capital. Ukraine says the EU will be guarantor in any gas deal with Russia. Myanmar holds a major meeting Friday. And claims of cheating delay SAT results for South Korean and Chinese students. More

  • Video Singapore Film Ban Raises Free Speech Issue

    The documentary film, “To Singapore, with Love” tells about political dissidents from Singapore. The film has been shown at public events in Britain, India and Malaysia, among other countries. But one place the movie cannot be seen is Singapore. That is because the government there has banned it. More

Featured Stories

  • Obama Halloween

    Audio Halloween Is Big with Kids and Business

    The National Retail Federation says sales of Halloween goods will total about $7.4 billion this year. It says the average American will spend about $77. The group expects 162 million people to celebrate. The NRF predicts 54 million of them will hold Halloween parties. | American Mosaic More

  • A print shows the Second Battle of Bull Run, also called Second Manassas.

    Audio South Defeats North Again at Manassas

    Lincoln named George Pope to lead the Army of Virginia. He wanted to join Pope’s forces with the Army of the Potomac and break through Confederate defenses around Richmond. But General Robert E. Lee decided to hit Pope first. More

  • Star House

    Video Home of Last Comanche Chief Close to Ruins

    One of the most interesting people in U.S. history is Quanah Parker, the last chief of the country’s Comanche Indian tribe. Quanah Parker was the son of a Comanche warrior and a white woman who had been captured by the Indians. Quanah Parker was a fierce fighter. More

  • FILE - A veterinarian at the nonprofit Bali Animal Welfare Association gives a rabies shot to a puppy in Kebon Kaja village, Bangli Regency in Bali, Indonesia.

    Audio Mass Vaccination of Dogs Can Eliminate Rabies

    About 70,000 people worldwide die every year of rabies. Rabies is a viral infection that people get mainly through dog bites. Scientists say vaccinating dogs can effectively get rid of rabies outbreaks in dog populations. And this will have a domino effect, fewer humans with rabies. More

  • Methane oxidizing

    Photogallery Small Organisms in Deep Sea Rocks Eat Methane

    The gas methane has been linked to rising temperatures on Earth. But methane does not stay in the atmosphere as long as another “greenhouse gas” -- carbon dioxide. Scientists say both gases trap heat from the sun. They prevent heat from escaping into outer space. More

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