April 26, 2015 04:48 UTC

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40th Anniversary for Mississippi River Steamboat

The New Orleans skyline shows St. Louis Cathedral, left, the Presbyterian Building, right, and the Natchez paddle boat headed down the foggy Mississippi River, Saturday, Dec. 31, 2005. New Orleans has a New Year's Eve celebration scheduled in the Jackson Square area with music including Arlo Guthrie and family and fireworks. (AP Photo/Judi Bottoni)

04/25/2015
In the 1800s, many steamboats sailed up and down the mighty Mississippi River, which divided the eastern states from the West. Today only a few of these steam-powered paddleboats still operate on the Mississippi. We travel on one of them and learn the history of the boats and the river. | As It Is More

Audio Rolling Stone's Mistaken Story of a Rape 'Was Avoidable'

In December of last year, a well-known American magazine retracted a major story. The story reported on a sexual attack at the University of Virginia. A student told the reporter a group of students raped her at a fraternity party in 2012. The magazine later said it was not true.

Video Women Seek to Join US Army Rangers

Army expects nearly 20 women will begin the difficult training on Monday; it says they will have to meet the same standards as men to graduate from course. Opinion study of male troops finds many do not think women should be Rangers. The Army says those who graduate will be Rangers.

Audio Guide to the US Presidential Campaign, Part One

Every four years Americans go to the polls in November to pick a president. Americans will elect the next president in November of 2016. Although the election is still more than a year away, candidates have been announcing they are running. The candidates will compete in caucuses and primaries.

Video Hillary Clinton Announces 2016 Campaign for President

“I’m running for president." Hillary Clinton kicks off her anticipated campaign for the presidency with a video posted on YouTube. With her second run for the White House, the former first lady and Secretary of State is hoping to become the first female president of the United States.

Video California Limits Water Use Because of Dry Weather

Governor Jerry Brown is ordering Californians to reduce their water use by 25 percent. Some communities are developing new measures to control water use. Golf courses and other major water users will face new restrictions. California homeowners are being paid to remove grass from their property.

Video Two Nations: Black America and White America

The National Urban League recently released its yearly report, called “The State of Black America.” The league works to help black Americans. Its report tells a familiar story of racial disparities in American life. It says blacks are much more likely to be unemployed than whites.

Audio Religious Freedom Acts Raise Controversy in US

Indiana and Arkansas recently passed – then considered changing – religious freedom laws. Nineteen other states have such laws to protect religious minorities. However, the new laws expand some religious protections to organizations. Some say the laws threaten the civil rights of homosexuals.

Audio Foods Important to Easter, Passover and the Spring

This weekend there are two traditional celebrations that American Christians and Jews celebrate every spring. You will see flat breads and chocolate rabbits in the stores. Other countries celebrate spring with roast lamb and a special table of foods.

Audio US National Park Service Preparing for 100th Anniversary

The U.S. National Park Service is getting ready to celebrate its centennial anniversary next year. The Secretary of the Interior was in New York City this week to kick off a new campaign tied to the anniversary. It is called “Find Your Park.” National Parks can be found in all 50 U.S. states.

Video Community Center Helps Women on Skid Row

Many homeless people live in the “Skid Row” area of Los Angeles, California. These men and women have no permanent place to live. Skid Row is a place where many social service groups can be found. They work to help the homeless find work and a place to live. One such organization works with women.

Audio Prison Watchdog Group Watching US Jails

The United States has more than two million people in prison. That is almost a fourth of the world's prison population. One group in the American state of Illinois is working to improve conditions for prisoners in that state. The John Howard Association was just rewarded for their prison work.

Video Landmark to Close as Camp David Hosts Afghan Meeting

Since the 1950s, American presidents have been going to Camp David in the mountains of Maryland, just outside Washington, D.C. They have traveled there to rest or hold meetings away from the noise of the city and the news media. But President Barack Obama rarely goes to the camp.

Video Secrets of a Saddle-Maker

People began riding horses thousands of years ago. Saddles for horseback riding were invented soon after. Today, many companies manufacture saddles. But it is rare to find someone who designs and makes these products by hand. American Keith Valley is one of the few.

Video Will the US Become a Bilingual Country?

Experts say the city of Los Angeles is showing the future of language in the U.S. More than half of young people there speak at least two languages fluently. Some say by the end of the century most Americans will come not come from white, English-speaking families.

Video 150-Year-Old US Capitol Dome Under Repair

The last major repair work on the U.S. Capitol took place in 1960. Since then, the dome has become weathered and worn. The Architect of the Capitol group reports the dome has more than 1,000 narrow breaks on its surface and other damage. The repair and repaint project will take two years.

Video Old Style Parenting Starts Debate in the U.S.

A court found parents in the U.S. state of Maryland guilty of neglect. What the parents did might surprise you. Some say laws are needed to protect children. Others say the government should not interfere in a family’s parenting decisions. The debate continues.

Video Who Controls US Foreign Policy: Congress or the President?

A letter signed by 47 Republican Senators says any deal without Congressional approval could be changed by a future president or Congress. Obama administration officials say the letter hurts sensitive negotiations and interferes with executive power. | In the News

Video What Happens to Lost US Airline Luggage?

Most people who fly on passenger planes in the United States do not lose their bags but some do. The unclaimed bags are sold at a store in the southern state of Alabama. You never know what you’re going to find there, including iPads, eyeglasses and laptop computers!

Video Trail Rides Kick off Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo

Trail rides are a big part of tradition for horse and bull riders from all over the huge state of Texas. It is a tradition that dates back to 1952. The Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo is where all of them show up to participate in the largest event of its kind in the world.

Learn with The News

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    A major earthquake and dozens of powerful aftershocks struck Nepal Saturday, destroying parts of Katmandu, the capital city. The quake killed more than 1,800 people. The 7.8-magnitude quake shook Mt. Everest, the highest mountain on Earth. It was the most powerful to hit the area in 81 years. More

  • Audio Islam Is the Fastest Growing Religion in the World

    Islam is the fastest growing religion in the world, according to a new study. The Pew Research Center spent six years studying the demographics of population and religion around the world. What they found is that as the world population grows between 2010 and 2050, so will Islam. More

  • The New Orleans skyline shows St. Louis Cathedral, left, the Presbyterian Building, right, and the Natchez paddle boat headed down the foggy Mississippi River, Saturday, Dec. 31, 2005. New Orleans has a New Year's Eve celebration scheduled in the Jackson Square area with music including Arlo Guthrie and family and fireworks. (AP Photo/Judi Bottoni)

    Video 40th Anniversary for Mississippi River Steamboat

    In the 1800s, many steamboats sailed up and down the mighty Mississippi River, which divided the eastern states from the West. Today only a few of these steam-powered paddleboats still operate on the Mississippi. We travel on one of them and learn the history of the boats and the river. | As It Is More

  • Audio US Senate Committee Approves Trade Promotion Authority Bill

    United States officials are working toward separate trade agreements with the European Union and Japan. At the same time, Congress committee approved Trade Promotion Authority. The measure sets congressional goals and guidance for trade negotiations. More

  • Audio When It Comes to Money, Black Is Better Than Red

    Colors come to the rescue when you want to describe a business that is making money or losing money. Judging from Jack Ma's smile at Alibaba's IPO at the New York Stock Exchange, he's making a lot of money. Also learn other useful banking terms. More

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    Colors come to the rescue when you want to describe a business that is making money or losing money. Judging from Jack Ma's smile at Alibaba's IPO at the New York Stock Exchange, he's making a lot of money. Also learn other useful banking terms. More

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    Many learners have questions about English grammar rules for using prepositions of place and time. We present a few simple guidelines to help you put your prepositions in the right places. In English, though, there is always an ‘exception to the rule. More

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  • Video Benito Cereno by Herman Melville, Part Three

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