August 01, 2015 11:48 UTC

USA

Louisiana Using BP Settlement Money to Restore Coast

07/28/2015
Five years ago, workers stopped a well that had been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for 87 days. This month, the company judged responsible for the disaster, BP, agreed to pay $18.7 billion to states along the Gulf coast. The money will help pay for economic and environmental restoration. More

Video Bus Brings Meals to Hungry Children

In the United States, millions of students depend on schools for meals during the school day. That means they eat less when schools are closed over the summer. An aid group has found a way to reach out to some of these children with a former school bus.

Audio Guide to 2016 Campaign: The Republicans

Welcome to the VOA Learning English guide to the presidential candidates. We tell you who is who and what their campaigns are saying. We also provide links to their websites to learn more. This guide centers on the 16 candidates for the Republican nominations.

Audio Guide to 2016 Campaign: the Democrats

This is part of a series of reports from VOA Learning English to guide you through the U.S. presidential campaign in 2016. This report centers on the candidates for the Democratic nomination. We tell you who they are, what their campaigns are saying, and where to go for more information.

Audio US Military Facing Threats from Terrorists, Countries

As extremist groups become more powerful, Russia and China are becoming more aggressive. The American military is struggling to deal with both of these threats at the same time as budget cuts are forcing it to release 40,000 soldiers.

Video Floodwaters Threaten Famous American Home

The Farnsworth House in the Midwestern state of Illinois is one of the most famous homes in America. Thousands of people visit the house every year. It stands near the river that inspired its design. Now that very placement is threatening the existence of this National Historic Landmark.

Audio Obama Calls for Changes to Criminal Justice System

The president says the United States jails as many people as the top 35 European nation combined. He also says U.S. law enforcement is treating young African Americans and Latino men differently than white Americans. His comments came a day after he reduced the jail sentences of 46 federal prisoners

Video American Muslims Fight Stereotypes

Muslims in the U.S. and around the world will celebrate the holiday of Eid-al-Fitr, the end of the holy month of Ramadan, on Friday. Ramadan is a time when Muslims fast and focus on God. For Muslims in the U.S., it is also a time to reflect and fight misconceptions and negative stereotypes of Islam.

Video Photographs Show How US Has Changed

A photography exhibit shows how much the United States changed from the early 1900s to the middle of the 20th century. The exhibit has more than 130 pictures in all. The show is called “American Moments.” It can be seen through the middle of September at The Phillips Collection in Washington.

Audio Women's World Cup Sets Records, Except Money

The Women’s World Cup final match between the U.S. and Japan set all kinds of records over the weekend. It was the most-watched soccer match ever, men’s or women’s, in United States history. Carli Lloyd scored the fast three goals in World Cup history. One record the game did not set? Money.

Audio Average Americans Gave Away Billions in 2014

Last year, Americans again showed they are generous people. A majority of Americans, two-thirds, gave money to charity in 2014. And they gave away more money than ever before. They gave away an estimated total of $358 billion. It is a seven percent increase from 2013.

Audio New York Officials Block Pro-Muslim Advertising

Two Muslims are taking New York City’s public transportation system to court. The Metropolitan Transit Authority had accepted anti-Muslim advertising until last year. But in a sudden change, it is now barring pro-Muslim ads. The two say that violates their rights under the U.S. constitution.

Audio The Changing Face of America

The faces of Americans in the United States are changing rapidly. In a few decades, the minority population will become the majority, as the white population decreases in the U.S. Those are the findings of a new report by the Census Bureau.

Video Oysters Return to New York’s Great South Bay

The Blue Point oyster is returning to the Great South Bay of New York after almost disappearing from the world marketplace. Over-farming, pollution and Hurricane Sandy had severely damaged the Blue Point oyster business. Now, the population is growing in its home on the coast of Long Island.

Audio Things You (Probably) Don’t Know About the 4th of July

Sure, you know Americans celebrate their Independence Day on the fourth day of July. But do you know they have the wrong date? Or where they get all those fireworks? Hint: not from the UK.

Video France's 'Freedom Frigate' to Celebrate 4th of July

A warship from France that came to the United States 235 years ago became a sign of friendship between the two countries. The French ship traveled across the Atlantic Ocean to help defeat the British during the American revolutionary war. Now a full-scale replica has been making that same trip.

Video Japanese-Americans Remember End of World War II

VOA goes to a gathering of old men who served in the American military during the war. They fought against Japan while their families were being detained in internment camps in the US. “I…felt very strongly that we needed to show that we were patriotic Americans.” | As It Is

Video Motorcycle Lovers: We Are Not Criminals

But police say some motorcycle gang members are violent lawbreakers. Some gangs say they have been operating for many years and have never been charged with crimes. “It is no different than a ladies tennis club,” they say. | As It Is

Video Nigerian Immigrant Lives the American Dream

Lookman Afolayan Mashood came to the United States in 1996 and is now a U.S. citizen. About five years ago, he and his girlfriend, Natalie Goldberg, opened their own restaurant in Brooklyn. He says the American dream is still alive. And he says “there’s no food compared to Nigerian food.”

Audio More American Fathers Stay Home to Raise Kids

More and more fathers in the United States are trading in the traditional role of breadwinner -- the person earning money -- for the role of stay-at-home dad. Meet two fathers who have been on this road for the past decade. You can also learn some great words such as "clique" and "masculinity."

Learn with The News

  • Audio China’s Stock Market Hit with Turmoil in July

    After a year of increases, stock prices in China had a correction, a sudden drop in price. The Chinese government has put in place a number of measures to support prices including lending money for stock purchases. But some question how much the stock market will affect the economy. More

  • A health worker prepares to inject a man with an Ebola vaccine in Conakry, Guinea, March 7, 2015.

    Audio ‘Highly Effective’ Ebola Vaccine Developed in Guinea

    Researchers say they have developed a vaccine that highly effective at preventing the disease Ebola. The World Health Organization says the vaccine has so far been 100 percent effective in tests in Guinea. Norway’s foreign minister called it “the silver bullet." More

  • Audio In Africa, Obama Praises Progress, Calls for Change

    During his visit to Kenya and Ethiopia, the first African-American president said “the world must recognize Africa’s extraordinary progress.” But he also called for a change in the continent’s cultures of corruption and discrimination. More

  • Audio China Holding Military Exercises in South China Sea

    China’s state media say the exercises took place Tuesday and more are to begin Saturday. Some U.S. and international security experts think China may be preparing to establish an air defense identification area in the South China Sea. | As It Is More

  • Video Wreckage Could Be From Missing Malaysia Airlines Flight

    An airplane part about two meters long was on Reunion Island, 3,500 kilometers from where the flight was last heard from. Now, investigators are trying to find out if it really is part of the plane that went missing in March 2014. The piece is about two meters long. It appears to be a flaperon. More

Featured Stories

  • Audio Study Shows How Poverty Could Limit Learning

    Studies have shown that children from poor families have more difficulty in school than other boys and girls. Children with higher socioeconomic roots seem better prepared and perform better on school tests. Now, American researchers may have found a biological reason for that difference. More

  • Audio Study: Smoking May Increase Risk of Schizophrenia

    Researchers reviewed 61 studies from around the world; they discovered cigarette smoking is three times more common among those with schizophrenia who were receiving medical care for the illness for the first time compared to people who did not have the mental disorder. More

  • Audio Folk to Rock: When Dylan Went Electric

    Fifty years ago, folk music legend Bob Dylan rocked out at the Newport Folk Festival in Rhode Island on an electric guitar. He was widely booed. The audience may have been unhappy with Dylan’s performance that day, but it changed the direction of music and culture in the United States. More

  • Audio Why Do Mosquitoes Choose to Bite You?

    Mosquitoes need blood to survive and their favorite target is humans. They are completely driven by smell. How do they find their victims and why do they prefer some people more than others? New research now shows how mosquitoes choose who to bite. More

  • 'You're Giving Me the Creeps!'

    "You're giving me the ...!" The jitters, the creeps, the willies, the heebie-jeebies, goose bumps, butterflies, and a heart attack ... you can give all these things to other people. Are they good or bad? Read on to find out! More

Practice Your Writing

Confessions of an English Learner
Confessions of an English Learner blog

Tell us About Our Programs