October 21, 2014 07:10 UTC

USA

Naming the Nameless Dead on US-Mexico Border

**ADVANCE FOR MONDAY SEPT. 22** Dr. Lori Baker, a forensic scientist at Baylor University, poses for a photo at her lab in Waco, Texas, Aug. 29, 2003. Baker recently launched an ambitious project to try to match unidentified remains found along the bord

10/14/2014
From January to September of this year an estimated 230 migrants died trying to cross the border from Mexico into the United States. Most are nameless. One professor is trying to name these victims and give their families closure. | As It Is More

Audio Hundreds of California Homes in Need of Water

Severe drought has struck California for a third year. The lack of water is affecting farms, cities and small communities. California’s Central Valley is usually fertile. But the lack of rainfall has left hundreds of homes without water.

Audio Same-Sex Marriage Rights Advance in the US

The Supreme Court decided not to change state laws permitting same-sex marriage. Now, a majority of U.S. states either currently allow gay couples to wed — or will shortly.

Audio US Memorial Honors Disabled Veterans

The memorial sits on a one hectare wide property. At the center is a fountain in the shape of a five-point star. It represents the five branches, or divisions, of the U.S. military. Visitors also will find a reflecting pool made from black granite.

Audio Chinese Firm Pays Record Price for Waldorf Astoria

The $1.95 billion deal with Anbang Insurance Group is the highest price ever paid for a U.S. hotel. Other Chinese buyers have also spent $22 billion on real estate investment in the U.S. for the twelve-month period ending in March 2014.

Audio Republicans Are Confident with Midterm Elections

Republicans currently control the House of Representatives; party leaders believe the November 4 election will give them control of the Senate, too. If the opposition party holds the majority in Congress, President Obama will have a difficult final two years in office.

Audio 91-Year-Old Achieves Dream, Learns To Fly

You are never too old to try to make your dreams come true! This could be Mary Moe's motto -- the expression that best captures her spirit. Mary Moe has done a lot during the past 91 years. For much of that time, she wanted to fly, but never had the chance – until now.

Audio Do You Want Milk with Magazines?

The US Postal Service has lost billions of dollars in the past few years. So, it is exploring other ways to earn money. Postal Service officials recently announced that they want to compete in “the grocery delivery market.” | As It Is

Audio US Secret Service Director Resigns

Julia Pierson resigned after a man carrying a knife jumped over a fence and gained entry to the White House. Former Secret Service special agent Joseph Clancy has been appointed the agency’s acting director. | In The News

Audio US 'Green Card' Lottery Registration Begins

The US government’s Diversity Immigrant Visa Program makes 50,000 visas available every year. The program is designed for people from countries that have “historically low rates of immigration to the United States.” | As It Is

Photogallery Former US President Jimmy Carter Turns 90

He won the Nobel Peace Prize and served as Georgia’s governor and as a Navy officer. Former peanut farmer, former nuclear engineer now works as a human rights activist. Liked and disliked around the world. He has written 26 books and is writing more. | As It Is

Photogallery Great Photographs from the US Library of Congress

iBook pictures come from “world’s greatest collection of photographs.” We talk with the editor who spent months looking at tens of thousands of photographs from which she had to choose just 730 to include in the book. | As It Is

Audio US: Chinese Hackers Attack US Military Command

A new report says evidence of about 50 attempted cyber espionage attacks on the U.S. Transportation Command during a one-year period.

Audio Reducing Clashes between Police and Black Youths

The shooting of an unarmed teenager fueled racial anger between police and Ferguson’s African American community. Now, some African-American parents and social workers are talking to young people about how to act when stopped by police.

Video Street Artists Add Color to Washington, DC Buildings

Like many cities, Washington has a graffiti problem. Buildings and homes, especially in low-income neighborhoods, are often targets of illegal artwork. Officials in the nation's capital have come up with an innovative program that uses the talents of local artists to beautify the city.

Video Police, Citizens Work to Create Safer Neighborhoods

American police are using “community policing” to both fight crime and improve relations with citizens in many areas. | As It Is

Audio Botanist Works to Save Hawaii's Rare Plants

Hawaii is home to many native plants. They include 1,200 species, 90 percent of which are not found anywhere else in the world. But Hawaii also has become the endangered species capital of the United States. Nearly 40 percent of the plants on that endangered list grow in Hawaii.

Audio Video Highlights Domestic Abuse Issue

Twenty-five percent of American women will experience domestic violence, that is, physical abuse by a partner. Most cases are never reported to police. But recently such violence was captured on video tape.

Remarks of President Barack Obama Address September 10, 2014

My fellow Americans – tonight, I want to speak to you about what the United States will do with our friends and allies to degrade and ultimately destroy the terrorist group known as ISIL.

Audio Girl Shoots Instructor, Fueling Gun Debate

After a nine-year-old accidentally killed her gun instructor, Americans talk once again about guns and children. In the United States, federal law bars anyone younger than 18 from owning a handgun. But, many state laws give young people the right to shoot all kinds of guns.

Learn with The News

  • Indonesian President Joko Widodo gestures to the crowd during a street parade following his inauguration in Jakarta, Indonesia, Monday, Oct. 20, 2014. (AP Photo/Achmad Ibraham)

    Audio Hope, Expectation for New Indonesian Leader

    Joko Widodo is a former businessman and governor of Jakarta. He has no ties to the political establishment. There are huge expectations for the new president in the world’s third-largest democracy. More

  • Bishops attend the beatification ceremony of Pope Paul VI, and a mass for the closing of of a two-week synod on family issues, celebrated by Pope Francis, in Saint Peter's Square at the Vatican,  Sunday, Oct. 19, 2014.

    Audio Catholic Bishops Reject Plan to 'Welcome' Gays

    Conservatives had criticized an early document from the two-week-long meeting of bishops in Rome. That document sought to limit criticism of people who have same-sex relationships. The final document approved by the bishops disappoints liberals but pleases conservatives. | As It Is More

  • A man works on a cassava farm in Nigeria.

    Audio Climate Change Could Destroy Farms in Africa

    About 70 percent of those who live in rural areas of sub-Saharan Africa are small-scale farmers. They produce about 80 percent of the food needed to feed the people of Africa. And they need a lot of help dealing with the effects of climate change. | As It Is More

  • Indonesia's President Joko Widodo, left, walks with former president Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono at the presidential palace in Jakarta, Indonesia, Oct. 20, 2014.

    Audio Indonesians Welcome New President

    Also, Turkey and US help Kurdish forces fight Islamic State, and finally some good news on the fight against Ebola. | In the News More

  • African Cheetahs

    Audio Is the Cheetah Fast Enough to Survive?

    In 1900, about 100,000 cheetahs lived in the world. Today there are only 10,000 of the animals. It appears that the cheetah is vulnerable to attacks by other animals because of its physiology. More

Featured Stories

  • Brain Resource Infographic

    Audio Dealing with Distractions and Overreactions

    More and more children are diagnosed with ADHD, a condition that makes it hard to focus. | HEALTH REPORT More

  • Millions of years of history, which can be found on the ocean floor, are collected and analyzed at the Core Repository in New York.

    Video Scientists Create New Maps of Ocean Floor

    Until recently, scientists had mapped only about 20 percent of the sea floor. But our knowledge of the deep seas is changing because of information from satellites. Scientists have produced a new map that provides a detailed picture of the oceans. More

  • General George McClellan created a strong Union force, but he worried he did not have enough men to defeat the Confederacy.

    Audio McClellan Approaches Richmond ... And Waits

    The North and South clashed in a series of battles called the Seven Days Campaign. The struggle saved the Confederacy but came at a terrible price. But victory came at a terrible price. Twenty thousand Confederate soldiers were killed or wounded. More

  • Solar Storm

    Audio How to Weather a Solar Storm

    The sun’s energy creates light and heat. It also produces charged electrical particles and magnetic fields. The sun can keep the earth nice and warm and helps our crops to grow. But a sudden burst of that solar energy can cause a power outage. More

  • Video Sting, War, Lou Reed for Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

    Rock and Roll Hall of Fame officials nominated Green Day, The Paul Butterfield Blues Band, Chic, Joan Jett and the Blackhearts, Kraftwerk, The Marvelettes, N.W.A., Nine Inch Nails, The Spinners and The Smiths. More

Practice Your Writing

Confessions of an English Learner BlogConfessions of an English Learner Blog

Tell us About Our Programs