April 29, 2016 01:54 UTC

This Is America

This Is America looks at major issues in American life and society, and explores popular places across the United States.


2:05 PM - 2:13 PM April 28, 2016

Democrats, Republicans Disagree on Supreme Court Nomination


2:08 PM - 2:17 PM April 22, 2016

High Demand from Investors for Special US Visas


1:09 AM - 1:15 AM April 22, 2016

Mount Rainier National Park


8:35 PM - 8:41 PM April 19, 2016

Will US Let Some Undocumented Immigrants Stay?


7:10 PM - 7:19 PM April 15, 2016

Mesa Verde National Park: Protecting an Ancient Culture


10:28 PM - 10:37 PM April 13, 2016

Twelve Mispronounced U.S. Place Names


9:22 PM - 9:31 PM April 07, 2016

History and Nature at Dry Tortugas National Park


8:56 PM - 9:04 PM March 31, 2016

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park


4:07 PM - 4:12 PM March 24, 2016

Are 16 and 17 Mature Enough to Vote?


9:27 PM - 9:32 PM March 23, 2016

Washington's Cherry Blossoms Signal Start of Spring


8:41 PM - 8:51 PM March 16, 2016

The Grand Canyon: Beyond Words


8:50 PM - 8:54 PM March 07, 2016

U.S. Park Tells the Story of Women's Rights Movement


11:21 PM - 11:31 PM February 29, 2016

From Child of Freed Slaves to Millionaire


7:08 PM - 7:14 PM February 26, 2016

Is There More Lying in This Election


5:53 PM - 5:54 PM February 24, 2016

Mars Candy Bars Recalled


5:24 PM - 5:26 PM February 24, 2016

Trump Wins Nevada Caucus


7:39 PM - 7:47 PM February 23, 2016

Trappist Monastery in Virginia Countryside


7:35 PM - 7:37 PM February 12, 2016

Making Women Sign Up for the Draft Stirs Debate


6:56 PM - 6:59 PM February 12, 2016

Hollywood Studios Chase Chinese Audiences


2:12 AM - 2:19 AM February 12, 2016

Presidential Facts and 'Firsts'

    Audio High Demand from Investors for Special US Visas

    Some lawmakers say the program is being abused; they say it should be cancelled because some of the people it lets into the United States may be criminals or spies, and many of the projects it supports are in rich parts of the country, not developing areas.

    Audio Will US Let Some Undocumented Immigrants Stay?

    About 10 million undocumented immigrants live in the U.S. This week, the U.S. Supreme Court is considering whether to allow some undocumented immigrants to stay for a limited period and apply to work legally.

    Pope’s Message on Family in Line with US Catholics

    Pope Francis’ call for clergy to welcome nontraditional couples is similar to views of many U.S. Catholics. The Pew Research Center found a majority support changes similar to what the pope urged in an April 8 message. A large number, though, said they hoped for even more changes.

    Audio Twelve Mispronounced U.S. Place Names

    American English is influenced by many different cultures. This can makes pronunciation difficult. This is especially true of place names. Read on to learn how to correctly pronounce names many people mispronounce. Also, learn some useful adjectives that describe places!

    Audio Supreme Court Helps Define ‘One Person, One Vote’

    A recent Supreme Court ruling said states can count all residents – not just voters -- to determine representation. The issue is how to determine how many seats in Congress and state legislatures to give states and local communities. The ruling came in a case out of Texas.

    Audio Large Cars on Top At New York Auto Show

    In the 1990s, automakers tried to sell small cars in the U.S. as gas prices increased to almost $4 per gallon in 2012. But now, with more efficient engines and lower gas prices, the big car companies think Americans are ready for big cars again.

    Audio Are Teenagers Mature Enough to Vote?

    Most countries set 18 as the minimum age to vote. But some argue it should be lower. Lowering the age to 16 would get teens interested in government, says Generation Citizen. It is one of the groups working for a lower voting age in the United States.

    Foreign Leaders Taking Sides Against Donald Trump

    Usually, government leaders do not say much about elections in other countries. But this year is an exception. Some world leaders are giving their views about one U.S. presidential candidate. That candidate is businessman Donald Trump. And most of the comments are negative.

    Audio Americans Take 80% of World's Opioid Supply

    The United States has 4.6 percent of the world’s population. But a report says Americans consume 80 percent of the world’s opioid supply. Federal officials are warning about an increase in deaths from opioid overdoses and calling on doctors to offer alternatives for pain relief.

    Audio Americans Who Turned in Their Passports Tell Why

    In 2015, a record 4,279 people gave up their U.S. citizenship. Most do so because of a 2010 law toughening enforcement of a law that requires Americans to pay taxes on “worldwide income,” not just money earned in the U.S. Some of those who gave up citizenship said the decision was very emotional.

    Audio Silent Monks Learn to Speak for Revenue

    Our Lady of the Holy Cross Abbey is a Trappist monastery in the Virginia countryside. It sits on a beautiful 1200-acre, or 500 hectare estate. The monks follow the Rule of St. Benedict, who lived in the 6th century. But they’ve also adapted to the modern world with innovative outreach programs.

    Audio Is There More Lying In This Election?

    Fact checkers, people who check the truthfulness of candidate statements, are busy examining statements by those running for president. Republican Donald Trump is making the most false statements. But he isn’t the only one.

    Audio From Freed Slave to Millionaire Businesswoman

    Madam C.J. Walker was the first African-American millionaire. But she grew up poor, and worked as a washer woman before she made her money selling hair care products to African-American women around the turn of the 20th century. She also helped many in her community make a better life.

    Where Are the Best Educated Americans?

    The best educated Americans live mainly in the northeastern United States or in California, a new study finds. Mississippi was ranked at the bottom of the list. Just 20 percent of adults there went to college. Other states near the bottom were Louisiana, Nevada, Oklahoma and Arkansas.

    Audio Presidential Facts and 'Firsts'

    The third Monday of February is known as Presidents’ Day in the United States. For almost 100 years, America officially honored the birthday of its first president, George Washington, on February 22. That is his birthday. That date was a national holiday until 1968.

    Audio America's Travel Destinations 'On the Rise'

    New York City may be the most popular place to visit in America, but the country has many small towns that are worth exploring, too. Here are the 2016 “Destinations on the Rise,” chosen by the travel website TripAdvisor. The expression ‘on the rise’ means that something is becoming more popular.

    Audio US Gives Less Foreign Aid than Americans Think

    Asked how much foreign aid the United States provides each year, Americans estimated 25 percent, according to a recent poll. The correct answer is 1 percent. Israel, Afghanistan and Egypt get the most.

    Audio More Cases of Brain Disease from Football Blows

    Antwaan Randle-El played professional football for nine seasons. He played for the Pittsburgh Steelers when that team won the Super Bowl in 2006. Now, at 36 years old, he can barely walk down the steps in his home.

    Audio White House Protester Dies After Longest Vigil

    For over 30 years, Concepcion Picciotto demonstrated just across the street from the White House in Washington, D.C. A Spanish immigrant, she protested against war and nuclear weapons. She and her fellow protesters lived in a camp, in the rain, the heat and even the snow.

    Video Water Crisis in US City a 'Disaster, Not Just an Emergency'

    Not having access to clean drinking water is a problem in many areas of the world -- including the United States. Residents of an industrial U.S. city are angry and are demanding to know what happened. Why did no one tell them they were drinking poisoned water for more than a year?

Featured Stories

The Day in Photos

Empty shelves are seen after items sold out at a store following a series of earthquakes in Kumamoto, Japan, in this photo taken by Kyodo.

Empty shelves are seen after items sold out at a store following a series of earthquakes in Kumamoto, Japan, in this photo taken by Kyodo.