October 24, 2014 10:18 UTC

Home

#6 - How Did Hollywood Become Hollywood? - 2004-10-13

Hollywood is the center of America's movie industry. It is part of the city of Los Angeles, in the western state of California.

In eighteen-eighty-seven, a man named Harvey Wilcox decided to sell some farmland he owned near Los Angeles. He hoped builders would put up houses there. Harvey's wife thought the name Hollywood would be nice for the new housing development. She liked the sound of the word, although no holly trees grow in California.

At first, Hollywood was just a little town surrounded by orange trees and farms. But new technology would change it forever.

Inventors in the United States and Europe had become interested in the idea of making pictures that moved. Thomas Edison's company showed the first moving picture machine in eighteen-ninety-three. Two years later, the Lumiere brothers of France showed the first simple moving picture in Paris.

American businessmen and artists hurried to explore the possibilities of the new technology. No one, however, suspected that movies would become the most popular kind of art in history.

Soon, theaters around the United States began showing short movies. In nineteen-oh-nine, some of the largest American movie-making companies joined together. They legally stopped other companies from using the new technology. So, independent movie producers moved away from the Atlantic coast, the center of movie-making at that time.

Independent movie producers wanted to go where eastern lawyers would not make trouble for them. They also wanted to go where there was warm weather and sunshine throughout the year. Hollywood was perfect.

The Nestor Company built the first movie studio in Hollywood in nineteen-eleven. Two years later, Cecil B. Demille produced the first long, serious movie in Hollywood. It was called "The Squaw Man."

Director D. W. Griffith also arrived in Hollywood in those early years. He created new ways of using a camera to tell a story through moving pictures.

Soon, the quiet community of farms and orange trees had changed. By the nineteen-twenties, Hollywood had become the movie capital of the world.

This forum has been closed.
Comments
     
There are no comments in this forum. Be first and add one

Learn with The News

  • Audio Gunman Identified in Canadian Capital

    Also, UN human rights officials have called on China to guarantee open elections in Hong Kong. And, an attack in southwest Pakistan kills 11 people. WHO advises against Ebola travel bans. | In the News More

  • Tiny Police Cameras Oakland

    Video US Police Increase Use of Body Cameras

    Police officers in Washington, DC, and New York City are wearing cameras on their bodies as part of a test. The goal of the program is to reduce the use of force by officers and lower the number of criticisms from citizens. Police officers in many smaller communities are already doing so. More

  • General view of the city of Luxembourg in this picture taken on November 20, 2012.

    Audio Luxembourg Set to End Bank Secrecy

    European Union finance ministers have reached an agreement that will make it more difficult for tax avoiders to hide their money. The new legislation was approved last week after Luxembourg and Austria agreed to lift their vetoes. Countries known as tax havens had blocked the bank secrecy laws. More

  • Armed officers approach Parliament Hilll following a shooting incident in Ottawa, Oct. 22, 2014.

    Video Deadly Attack Shocks Canada's Capital

    Also, Kurdish lawmakers in Iraq vote to send Kurdish forces to the Syrian town of Kobani. China said 43 people tested for possible Ebola infection do not have the virus. Russia and Ukraine are still working to reach an agreement on Ukraine's payments for natural Gas. More

  • FBI Director James Comey speaks about the impact of technology on law enforcement, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2014, at Brookings Institution in Washington.

    Audio Apple, FBI Battle Over Privacy Rules

    Apple recently said it was increasing security settings on its latest operating system for the company’s wireless devices. Apple said its new encryption rules are designed to protect users from search and seizure of their iPhones. But the changes are of concern to federal investigators. More

Featured Stories

  • Audio Oscar de la Renta Dressed First Ladies and Movie Stars

    Clothing designer Oscar de la Renta died Monday at his home in the American state of Connecticut. He was 82 years old. His wife said he died of problems related to cancer. Mr. de la Renta dressed American movie stars and first ladies such as Jacqueline Kennedy, Nancy Reagan and Hillary Clinton. More

  • Audio Iron Ships Clash at Sea

    The American Civil War was fought not only on land, but at sea. In 1862, Confederate and Union forces fought a new kind of navy battle in waters off Hampton Roads, Virginia. It was the first battle between iron ships. On the Confederate side was a ship called the Virginia. | The Making of a Nation More

  • Audio San Francisco Radio Stations Ban Lorde's 'Royals'

    The California baseball team, San Francisco Giants, is playing the Kansas City Royals for the 2014 Major League Baseball championship, the World Series. Two radio stations in San Francisco banned the hit song "Royals." In return, another station in Kansas City chose to play the song once every hour. More

  • A neurovascular unit on a chip being developed by Vanderbilt University researchers. (Vanderbilt University Photo/John Wikswo)

    Video Scientists Design Chips to Act Like Human Organs

    Testing new drugs for safety and effectiveness is a costly process in the United States. It also can take a lot of time. Some scientists are now designing silicon computer chips that act like human organs. The scientists think they have found a way to make the process faster and more economical. More

  • Brain Resource Infographic

    Audio Dealing with Distractions and Overreactions

    Five million American children and teenagers have Attention Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder, commonly known as ADHD. ADHD makes it difficult - if not impossible - to stay with a duty until it is complete. Katherine Ellison knows the problem well. | Health Report More

Practice Your Writing

Confessions of an English Learner BlogConfessions of an English Learner Blog

Tell us About Our Programs