December 21, 2014 02:35 UTC

In the News

Arrests in the Shooting of a Pakistani Schoolgirl

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Women hold candles during a rally condemning the attack on schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, Karachi, Pakistan, October 11, 2012.
Women hold candles during a rally condemning the attack on schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, Karachi, Pakistan, October 11, 2012.

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From VOA Learning English, this is IN THE NEWS in Special English.
 
Pakistani police have arrested suspects in the shooting of a fourteen year old school girl. Officials say the arrests took place in northwest Pakistan’s Swat Valley. The Taliban has claimed responsibility for the attack.
 
Malala Yousafzai was shot in the head and neck Tuesday as she left school. The following day, doctors successfully removed a bullet from her neck. She is being treated at the country’s top military hospital. Doctors say she has a seventy percent chance of surviving.  
 
Malala Yousafzai became famous for speaking out against the Taliban. Witnesses say gunmen who came to her school asked for her by name. The gunmen open fired as she was entering a school bus. Two other students also were wounded.
 
The Taliban says Malala Yousafzai was targeted for what it called her “pro-West” ideology. It says she denounced the Taliban and called President Obama her hero. On Friday a spokesman for the group said Taliban leaders decided a few months ago to kill the school girl, and told gunmen to carry out the attack.
 
The girl’s uncle, Ahmed Shah Yousafzai, is head of the Swat Valley Peace Council. He told VOA that no one expected that such a fierce attack would be carried out against her.

"People once again are terrified; they are scared that the situation is getting worse. Until now, people were hopeful that peace has been restored. Yes, in Swat we witnessed targeted killing time after time, but no one was expecting a ninth-grade student would be targeted this brutally."
 
The Taliban led a violent campaign for control of the Swat area in two thousand eight and two thousand nine. The campaign included attacks on schools. The Taliban had banned girls from attending school.
 
It was in this period that then eleven year old Malala Yousafzai began to document the abuses by the Taliban. Using the name Gul Makai, she wrote about them in a blog published by the BBC.
 
Her blog told about her experiences in areas controlled by the Taliban. She and her friends had disobeyed the ban by attending school.

In twenty eleven, the Pakistani government recognized Malala Yousafzai with the National Peace Award. But attacks on girls’ schools continued in the country’s northwest. Last October, a Pakistani official told VOA that about one thousand two hundred schools had been destroyed over the past few years.
 
Pakistani political and religious leaders have condemned the attack. So have Afghan President Hamid Karzai and President Obama. American Secretary of State Hillary Clinton praised the work of the young activist and said Islamic militants feel threatened by powerful women.
 
On Friday, Pakistanis at Islamic centers across the nation prayed for the girl’s recovery. And in Switzerland, United Nations experts urged Pakistan’s government to make sure that school children, especially girls, are protected.
 
And that's IN THE NEWS in VOA Special English. I'm Steve Ember.


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by: julian from: colombia
10/19/2012 1:22 PM
Hello world.


by: Jose from: Spain
10/17/2012 9:18 PM
Eduacted and well prepared women make this worl a far better one. Fanatism is fanatism no matter what religion is coming from.
Hurrai Malala!

In Response

by: Alves Tahir Naqqash from: Brazil
10/22/2012 11:56 PM
You are really right. What can be done to stop such kind of fanatism? It worries me sometimes.

In Response

by: Jose from: Spain
10/26/2012 8:19 AM
What can we do? It is really difficult. Fanatics are blind and usually led by inteligent but fanatic leaders. In my opinion, we must behave exemplary.


by: Rachen from: Bangkok
10/16/2012 2:37 PM
Dear Malala, I hope you are get well soon, and I would like to tell you that; you have a braveheart, even thought you are just a 14 year old girl, I will pray for you, and I hope that you going to wake up tomorrow to see how freedom and beautiful the world is.


by: shabnam
10/15/2012 7:41 PM
I become so sad after I watched this video .I think that terrorist has no religion and they are not human they're wild animals.A realy muslim pray God .I dream a world wihout war and murder.


by: francoamerican from: Edgewood - USA
10/15/2012 2:33 PM
These people are the people that Obama wants to talk to so they can be friends with us. These are the same people who would shoot an innocent fourteen year old just because she wants to have an education. He goes over there and apologizes to these cowards for the way the USA has defended people who don't want to be under their dictatorial control.
He needs a dose of reality.


by: Maurizio from: Italy
10/15/2012 8:26 AM
It's the same story: people that want impose itself on the other, use the policy, religions, money and so on to reach his/her goal! When someone has the courage to say no, violence is used against him/her also in COWARD way!


by: kunga from: Tibet
10/14/2012 9:17 AM
Lhsa is the capital city of Tibet four million peopele live in Lhsa .Lhsa has a small harbour.sometimes thery are very cold weather in the Lhsa thery are many intersting temple and mountain .mnay years ago histroy or peoples is respectability .near the rive .But in winter is very cold and to fall snowstorm.In the sumer Autumn and spring months very beautiful weather .If you have holiday time you will be travel in Tibet very nice and we Tibetan of you will come in Tibet and you have enjoy holiday we hope.


by: LMK from: Moscow
10/14/2012 6:36 AM
The right column with video placed on youtube rather comically looks with persons, in particular with the girl, the young brunette, to all other sexually looked. As that not absolutely training))


by: Alper from: Turkey
10/13/2012 6:15 PM
Terrorist has no religion. Real Muslims are not Taliban. Real Muslims are the people that praying to God for the healing little girl in mosques.


by: Su Dinc from: Ankara, Turkey
10/13/2012 2:27 PM
She is eleven years old yet but she has a huge heart for the sake of humanity and peace. It is so natural that she is considered as a threat because she is thinking about events around her and questioning them. She is more powerful than the gunmen. I am praying for the recovery of Malala too. Our hearts and prayers are with her...

In Response

by: captain from: Ankara, TURKEY
10/17/2012 8:43 PM
I think Malala must become a heroin and rolemodel for other Pakistani girls and women. I really know what are they experienced there, because I worked in the country recently...Have a good night...

In Response

by: evelyn from: jackson ms
10/29/2012 4:21 PM
you are really right i agree wit u on that

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