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Black smoke is seen rising above South Sudan's capital, Juba, on July 10, 2016. Days of fighting have included attacks on United Nations facilities. The UN says the attacks could be considered war crimes.

Black smoke is seen rising above South Sudan's capital, Juba, on July 10, 2016. Days of fighting have included attacks on United Nations facilities. The UN says the attacks could be considered war crimes.

From Washington, this is VOA News.

I’m Michael Brown reporting.

There is heavy fighting between rival factions in South Sudan’s capital Monday. The fifth day of violence began just hours after the UN (United Nations) Security Council called on the leaders of each group to control their armed forces and warned the attacks on civilians and UN facilities may constitute war crimes.

Former rebel leader Riek Machar joining Salva Kiir, the president, in issuing an appeal for calm.

"This is an interruption to the good process that we have initiated. We want to continue this process of dialogue among ourselves, resolving issues so that the country comes out of the conflict. So we are calling on all the population, all South Sudanese, whether armed or not armed, to respect (the) ceasefire."

The two sides fought each other in a two-year civil war that erupted after the president fired Machar in 2013.

The recent fighting broke out Thursday and is believed to have left nearly 300 dead, including a Chinese U.N. peacekeeper.

North Korea warned Monday it will take a physical response to the decision by the United States and South Korea to deploy a sophisticated anti-missile defense system, as Pyongyang continues banned missile tests.

A Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) missile interceptor is launched during a test in this photo provided by the U.S. Department of Defense.

A Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) missile interceptor is launched during a test in this photo provided by the U.S. Department of Defense.

The move also drew a swift and sharp response from China. The so-called THAAD system is expected to be operational next year.

Al-Shabab fighters temporarily overran a Somali government military base west of Mogadishu Monday, killing soldiers and seizing weapons and military trucks.

A Mogadishu official said the militants controlled the base for around three hours before leaving. Al-Shabab attacked the same base in March this year seizing military trucks and rockets.

This is VOA News.

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