December 19, 2014 15:10 UTC

Education

Will Chinese Replace English as the Global Language?

In this photo taken on Tuesday, April 20, 2010, Cedar Lane Middle School students take a Chinese Language and Culture class in the Hacienda Heights area of Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

12/13/2014
Mandarin Chinese already has the most native speakers of any language. And, China may soon pass the United States as the world’s largest economy. Is Chinese the language of the future? Could it replace English as the world’s international language? Not so fast, several experts weigh in. More

Audio Writing the Narrative Essay: How to Find the Words

A narrative essay tells a story from the writer’s experience. It is something the writer has lived through. And this essay usually follows events in the order they happened. Experts from Purdue University offer tips and suggestions for finding the rights words for your own narrative essay.

Audio Understanding of English Improves Worldwide

The world’s understanding of English appears to be getting better. The private education company EF recently released a report called English Proficiency Index. The report ranks English language proficiency in 63 countries into five categories or classes. Test scores also increase in the TOEFL.

Audio Expand Your Skills for Writing College Papers

Many students say there is no easy way to write college papers. This may be especially true if English is not your first language. Most teachers agree that there is no single “correct” way to create a personal essay or a research paper. But there are methods to help you structure your papers.

Video S. Korean Students Stressed Over College Entrance Exam

More than half a million South Korean students in their final year of high school recently took the university entrance examination. Many people consider success on this test the first step toward a good life. But South Korean students say they feel stressed from the pressure.

Video US Hosts Record Number of Foreign Students

Almost 900,000 international students are studying in American colleges and universities today. Nearly half of this record number of foreign students are from Asia, mainly China. America also has more of the world’s 4.5 million international students than any other country. | Education Report

Video US Teachers Reach Out to Indonesians in 'Access'

Access provides two years of free English classes to needy young people around the world. One of the largest Access programs is in Indonesia --with about 1,000 students. To find out if there will be an Access class near you, contact the U.S. Embassy in your home country.

In Kenya Prison, Criminals Become Students

In Kenya Prison, Criminals Become Students

Video Tips for Applying to US Colleges, Part Two

For part two of our tips for applying to American colleges, we visit George Mason University, in Fairfax, Virginia. George Mason University is the largest public research university in the state of Virginia. It has about 33,000 students, and more than 100 different majors and specializations.

Audio Ebola Forces Sierra Leone Students to Learn by Radio

More than one million children in Sierra Leone have been unable to attend school because of the continuing Ebola crisis. But educational programs are now broadcast on 41 radio stations as well as the country’s only television station. The radio classes air three hours a day, five days a week.

Audio Writing Groups Can Help Students with Papers

Ms. Ahern-Dodson says that students usually share their writing only when it is completed and ready to give to the teacher. Instead, she suggests that you prepare an early draft version. Then, ask yourself who can give you helpful feedback, or reaction, on what you have written.

Video Tips for Applying to US Colleges

Editor's note: Here at VOA Learning English we get a lot of questions from our audience about higher education in the United States. So we visited several universities and spoke with students and administrators about your questions. The first school we visited was American University.

Audio Free Online Test Targets English Learners

The new exam is called the EFSET, which is short for Education First Standardized English Test. The company, Education First, is known by the letters EF. It operates schools and offices in more than 50 countries.

Audio Having Problems with a School Paper?

A Duke University expert advises against waiting to write until you’ve done all the research. Instead, write a little even if you are just half finished with the process. She says this way, you may get a better idea of what you want to understand and express.

Audio Getting Started with TOEFL

If you are interested in studying at an American university, you have probably heard about the Test of English as a Foreign Language. The test is widely known as the TOEFL. It is the most widely used language assessment exam for American universities.

Audio Is a College Education Worth the Price?

Attending a four-year college in the United States can cost more than $40,000 a year. That information comes from the College Board, a private company. Many people with a college education are drowning in student debt. They had to borrow money to finance their education.

Audio Tips for Better Writing

Everyone struggles with writing, however there are ways to ease your struggle when working on an essay or paper for class. Jennifer Ahern-Dodson, assistant professor of the Practice in Writing Studies at Duke University is here with some tips.

Audio Australia Links Aboriginal Aid to School Attendance

Parents in South Australia’s Aboriginal lands may lose some of their financial aid if they do not send their children to school. New rules link school attendance with payments for parents living. But the top advisor to the prime minister suggests other ways to get children to school.

Audio New US College Entrance Test Worries China

Recent changes to the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) are creating some political unease in China. The new SAT will require test-takers to read from parts of the U.S. Constitution, the Declaration of Independence or other historical documents.

Audio Street Vendor Helps Poor to Learn English and Japanese

Two brothers are helping the Hanoi’s poorest students by giving classes in English and Japanese. Demand for the classes are growing. About 1,000 people are on a waiting list to enter. Ten people have offered to teach for free.

Learn with The News

  • Mideast Islamic State US

    Audio Top Islamic State Leaders Killed in Airstrikes

    Three top Islamic State leaders were killed in a series of targeted airstrikes in Iraq. U.S. not ruling out White House visit by Cuban President Raul Castro. Suspected Boko Haram gunmen kidnap over 100 women, children. Putin says Russia’s economy will improve in two years. More

  • the interview

    Video Sony Criticized for Cancelling 'The Interview'

    The company acted after a group of computer hackers attacked the company and threatened to attack movie theaters that show the film. Most people have criticized Sony’s decision to cancel the release. The US says North Korea was behind the cyber attack. North Korea denies the accusation. More

  • The MOM Incubator could save more babies in refugee camps who die due to complications of premature birth.

    Audio Low-Cost Incubator May Save More Babies

    Premature birth is the biggest killer of children worldwide. About one million babies around the world die of problems because they are born too early. Many of these babies could have been saved if they had been placed in an incubator. A young British researcher says he has found a solution. More

  • A screenshot from Cuban television shows President Raul Castro addressing the country, in Havana, Dec. 17, 2014.

    Audio US, Cuba Normalize Relations

    After the release of Alan Gross from prison, U.S. and Cuba announce policy changes that end more than 50 years of diplomatic isolation that began in the Cold War. Also in the news, India joins Pakistan in mourning after Tuesday's Taliban attack. And Sony Pictures cancels release of "The Interview." More

  • Audio How Much of You Does Facebook Own?

    If you use Facebook, your friends may have posted an update recently saying Facebook is not permitted to violate their privacy. But how much of your data -- things you post -- does Facebook legally own? Experts say Facebook's terms of service agreement clearly says they own most of what you post. More

Featured Stories

  • Video Music Shows in Private Homes Gain Popularity

    Attending a live musical performance, be it in a huge arena or a small cafe, is an exciting experience. But here in the U.S., a very different kind of performance is gaining popularity: house concerts. “There's just a totally unique experience as opposed to playing like a coffee shop or a bar." More

  • Lee Surrenders to Grant at Appomatox

    Audio Southern General Robert E. Lee Surrenders at Appomattox

    General Robert E. Lee’s military skill and intelligence helped extend the war between the states. But even his skill could not save the South from the industrial power of the North and its mighty armies -- armies that were better-fed and better-equipped. On Sunday, August 9, Lee surrendered. More

  • Uganda Playground for Disabled Children

    Audio Helping Uganda’s Disabled Children Play

    You may think that all children have freedom to play. But for children who look differently from others or have physical disabilities, the idea of play can seem far away. An organization in Uganda is seeking to change that. Read on to learn words needed to talk about this sometimes difficult topic. More

  • A microneedle used to inject glaucoma medications into the eye is shown next to a liquid drop from a conventional eye dropper. (Georgia Tech Photo: Gary Meek

    Audio Tiny Needles Treat Eye Disease

    Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness around the world. In the United States, more than two million people suffer from the disease. Now, researchers are developing very small needles that may offer a more effective and painless treatment for glaucoma and other eye diseases. More

  • The National Museum of Organized Crime and Law Enforcement in Las Vegas

    Audio Mob Museum Tells About the Mafia in America

    The U.S. government has long used public money to fight organized crime. Now, public money is also paying for a museum in Las Vegas to tell about "The Mob,” and not everyone is happy about that. But some say it helps the local economy by bringing people to a part of Las Vegas that few visit. More

Practice Your Writing

Confessions of an English Learner BlogConfessions of an English Learner Blog

Tell us About Our Programs