May 23, 2015 02:40 UTC

Education

Everyday Grammar - Introducing Conditionals

05/22/2015
In everyday conversation, English speakers often talk about things that are not true. Or, they talk about things that only happen if something else happens. Learn how to correctly use these conditional forms in English. If you write to us, we will let you know if it is correct. More

Audio Successful Debate for New Learners and Large Classes

Many students of English engage in debate as part of their training. In Part Two of our Successful Debate series, we learn the kinds of debate topics that work well for English learners. An expert shares tips for organizing a debate in a large class and for answering arguments.

Audio Everyday Grammar: Problems with Pronouns and Gender

The English language is changing to meet the needs of online communities and a quickly changing society. Do we need new pronouns to talk about a person whose gender is unknown? It’s common now to hear that “Everyone has their own opinion” on this issue.

Audio Successful Debate is Like Building a House

As an English learner, you want to be able to understand and to discuss a subject. You want to have the ability to express your opinions, and to support that opinion. In the first of our three-part series on debate, an English teacher tells about his simple approach to teaching this valuable skill.

Audio Everyday Grammar - Simple Past and Present Perfect

In this week’s episode of Everyday Grammar we’re going to help you understand the difference between the simple past and the present perfect. English learners often confuse these two verb tenses.

Audio Everyday Grammar: Double Negatives - Can't Get None?

In this week’s episode of Everyday Grammar, we’re going to talk about two common types of double negatives. A double negative is when you use two negative words in the same clause of a sentence. Sometimes two negatives make a statement positive; sometimes two negatives form a stronger negative.

Video Learning Safaliba Helps Ghanaian Kids Learn English

In the Safaliba-speaking community of Ghana, children are beginning to read and write in their home language, Safaliba. Others notice this helps when the children begin learning in English. "Language is very powerful," says Paul Schaefer.

Audio Everyday Grammar: In, On and At

Many learners have questions about English grammar rules for using prepositions of place and time. We present a few simple guidelines to help you put your prepositions in the right places. In English, though, there is always an ‘exception to the rule.

Video More US Students Learning Korean

More US students are learning Korean. Why the increase? Experts say one reason is the popularity of K-pop music and Korean videos. Another is the number of young Korean-Americans who want to learn about their culture and speak to older family members who do not speak English.

Audio April 23 Is English Language Day

Happy English Language Day! English Language Day is celebrated each year on April 23 – the date when tradition says William Shakespeare was born. Shakespeare has been called the greatest writer in the English language. His plays continue to be published, performed in theaters and movies.

Audio Everyday Grammar: Gerunds and Infinitives

English learners have difficulty with gerunds and infinitives. A gerund is the –ing form of a verb that functions the same as a noun. For example, “Running is fun.” In this sentence, “running” is the gerund. It acts just like a noun.

Audio Cameroon Building Classrooms for Students Fleeing Boko Haram

Cameroon has launched an $8 million emergency program to help students displaced by Boko Haram militants. The government last month announced plans to build classrooms and housing for 70,000 students. The children cannot attend their own schools because of attacks along the border with Nigeria.

Video Philippines Attracts English Learners on a Budget

America continues to lead the world as a destination for international students. Last year about 900,000 foreign students were studying in the United States, about half of them from Asia. But a growing number of Asian students are looking closer to home to study English - the Philippines.

Audio Everyday Grammar: Put Prepositions in Their Place

English learners tell us that the toughest thing to learn in English is how to use prepositions. This week, we look at the prepositions that go with the verb, "provide."

Audio UN Representative Pushing for Safe Schools

The United Nations Special Envoy for Global Education, Gordon Brown, wants international support for his Safe Schools initiative. The campaign is aimed at finding ways to help children return to school in conflict and crisis areas such as Pakistan, Nigeria, and Syria.

Audio  'Uglish' Gets Its Own Dictionary in Uganda

The official language in Uganda is English. But visitors to this African country soon recognize that the English spoken here is different from British or American English. Researcher Bernard Sabiiti published a small dictionary of Ugandan English also known as "Unglish.'

Video A Blind Teacher's Vision

There are an estimated 70,000 blind children in Indonesia. Iyehezkiel Parudani lost his eyesight at age six from chicken pox. He now teaches English to blind and visually impaired students at the Pajajaran Special School in the city of Bandung.

Audio Everyday Grammar: Can You Correct 'Her and I?'

Editor's Note: "Everyday Grammar" is a new series of articles to address common mistakes in grammar; to explain complex sentence structure; to answer your questions about grammar; and to discuss phrases you might have heard in the news. Is it a good lesson for "you and I" or "you and me?"

Video Five Tips for Planning a Presentation

Charles LeBeau shares more tips for improving academic presentations in English. They include cultural knowledge about how to organize a speech as well as how to use images. Other tips include an understanding of your audience, topics and rehearsing your presentation.

Audio Improve Your Public Speaking With Body Language

Public speaking is difficult even for native speakers of English. Learners find it even more difficult. A big part of giving presentations is body language. Charles LeBeau, professor of public speaking, shares some advice on the speaker’s ‘physical message.’

Learn with The News

  • Video Learning at the Laundromat

    College students teach mathematics and English to poor, immigrant children at a coin laundry near Washington, DC. At the same time, the students are helping the owner of the business become more profitable. The tutoring is part of the business plan they have created. | As It Is More

  • Audio Islamic State Militants Capture Two Major Cities

    The Islamic State seized control of the Syrian city of Palmyra on Thursday. The fall of Palmyra reportedly left the militants in control of half of Syria. Last Sunday, the militants took control of Ramadi, the capital of Iraq’s Anbar Province.| In The News More

  • Fiery Cross Reef, Spratly Islands

    Audio China Warns US Spy Plane in South China Sea

    China's navy is reported to have issued eight warning messages to a U.S. military spy plane over several man-made islands. Boats with Rohingya migrants accepted in Indonesian waters. U.S. and Cuba continue talks toward diplomatic ties. More

  • Audio Google Self-Driving Car Heading to Public Streets

    This summer, the latest version of Google's self-driving car will make its first appearance on public roads. The two-seat vehicle does not need a gas pedal or steering wheel. The prototype can drive, brake and recognize road dangers without human involvement. More

  • Audio In the US Senate, Heated Debate Over Catfish

    Lawmakers in the U.S. Senate are debating the Trans-Pacific Partnership. But, the catfish, a popular farmed fish in some southern states, has caused a large share of the argument. Republican Senator John McCain criticized a measure calling for increased U.S. government inspections of Asian catfish. More

Featured Stories

  • Discover Debate

    Audio Successful Debate for New Learners and Large Classes

    Many students of English engage in debate as part of their training. In Part Two of our Successful Debate series, we learn the kinds of debate topics that work well for English learners. An expert shares tips for organizing a debate in a large class and for answering arguments. More

  • Nina Marranca looks at her phone, June 25, 2013.

    Audio Deaf-Blind Woman First to Use Braille Phone

    New technology allows deaf and blind people to use the telephone. The tests are underway in Australia and the U.S. It could help end isolation that people who cannot see or hear say they feel. Learn about this exciting new technology as well as words like "Braille" and "parallel testing." More

  • Video Resounding Earth: Creating Music from Metal

    "The title “Resounding Earth” on the one hand, we are talking about resounding earth. The earth is full of metals that all of mankind has turned into instruments. We are going to play them from all around the world together on one stage." More

  • Audio Common French Words in American English

    English is loaded with French words. Even if they mean something bad they sound so good. So read on to learn how to say them properly. Pictured here, French Actress Michele Morgan poses in a bathing suit at the 1st Cannes Film Festival in Cannes, France in 1946. More

  • Audio Everyday Grammar: Problems with Pronouns and Gender

    The English language is changing to meet the needs of online communities and a quickly changing society. Do we need new pronouns to talk about a person whose gender is unknown? It’s common now to hear that “Everyone has their own opinion” on this issue. More

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