March 29, 2015 16:06 UTC

Health & Lifestyle

New Treatment for AIDS Called a ‘Big Deal’

03/28/2015
Read on to learn words like mutate, neutralize and antiretroviral as you learn how researchers have found a way to trick HIV, the virus causing AIDS, into killing itself. The difficulty level might be high as this article describes what happens when a genetically modified cell become an HIV. More

Audio Too Much Gaming is a Pain in the Neck

Smartphones and other electronic devices, or gadgets, are becoming more affordable. Children in India are using them more and more. Doctors say children who spend long hours playing video games are increasingly showing signs of physical deformities, meaning their bodies are not growing properly.

Audio Feed the People or Save the Planet?

New food guidelines in U.S. do something they have never done before -- they are linked to the environment. Some say feeding the hungry should come first. Others say saving the planet is equally important. Read on to see words like "carbon footprint" and "sustainability" in action.

Audio What Causes Jet Lag and How to Avoid It

Traveling from one time zone to another can leave you feeling strange for several days, or "out of sync." This feeling is called jet lag. Jet lag is not all in your mind. It is also can affect the brain of flies. Read on for ideas on how to avoid jet lag on your next trip.

Audio A Tax on Sugar?

The World Health Organization says people around the world are eating more sugar. The WHO says more than 50 grams of sugar a day can lead to weight gain, tooth troubles and other diseases. It is urging governments in countries with high sugar intake to take steps to reduce how much sugar people eat.

Audio Sri Lankan-American Gives Back to Home Country

Many people leave their home country looking for a better education or a better job. Some never return. But some do return and they want to make the country they left a better place. Learn about a Sri Lankan woman who is doing just that.

Video Choosing to Be a Single Mother

U.S. officials say birth rates for unmarried women over age 40 have been rising in recent years. In fact, the rate in 2012 was almost 30 percent higher than just five years earlier. There are single mothers by choice. They are generally older, successful, well-educated, and financially secure.

Audio Understanding the Misunderstood Teenage Brain

A common battle cry of teenagers to adults is, "You just don't understand me!" Well, they might be right. A brain scientist (neuroscientist) and mother to two teenagers says the teenage brain is quite different from the adult brain. She "debunks," or clears up three common myths about teenagers.

Video Technology Increases Chances of Surviving Aneurym

Each year, half a million people die from brain aneurysms, -- when a blood vessel burst in the brain. For survivors, physical disabilities are often servere. They may include memory problems, loss of balance, trouble speaking and even blindness. But new technologies are increasing survival rates.

Video A Simple Treatment for Parkinson’s Disease: Exercise

Parkinson’s disease is a brain condition that makes it difficult to walk and simply to move. But some people are finding that a good way to treat the disease is not to move less – but to move more. This is complete change in thinking, something called a "philosophical shift."

Audio Pomegranate: Still Healthy at 5,000 Years Old

The pomegranate is one of the oldest known fruits. Pomegranates are found in ancient writings and pictured in the ancient art of many cultures and religions. The pomegranate is also a symbol of health, fertility and long life. Parts of the pomegranate tree and fruit are used to make medicine.

Audio US Study Links Air Pollution to Autism

Autism spectrum disorder is a developmental disability. People with autism have trouble communicating and with social skills. A new study found that pregnant women who were exposed to high levels of pollution toward the end of pregnancy are two times more likely to have a child with autism.

Video Light Pollution. How Much Light is Too Much?

Light pollution can affect our ability to see the night stars. It can also hurt our health and the planet. But light is needed to make our cities safe. How can we find a balance? In cities, artificial light comes from street lamps, buildings, signs and cars and blocks out stars in the sky.

Audio Will Chinese Drink Coffee over Tea?

Asia has long tradition of tea-drinking. And China is no exception. However, lately more and more Chinese people are turning to a different drink. Coffee has become an increasingly popular choice of Chinese people living abroad and in the country’s huge cities.

Audio Western Diet Bad for Human Health, Environment

The spread of Western eating habits around the world is bad for human health as well as for the environment. Those findings come from a new report in the journal Nature. Experts say there are ways to solve this diet-health-environment problem, but it will require a major change in eating habits.

Audio What Health Topics Are Most Important to You?

Ebola led health headlines around the world. But VOA Learning English's Health Report covered many more topics in 2014. To end the year on a happy note, we thought you might like to re-visit Learning English Health Report stories that were most viewed, Tweeted, and commented on this year.

Audio Chocolate Improves Memory and Heart Health

Researchers are realizing what chocolate-lovers have known for a long time -- that chocolate is good for you. Their study found that large amounts of flavanols, substances found in cocoa, tea and some vegetables, may help to reverse age-related memory failure and can help prevent strokes.

Audio Helping Uganda’s Disabled Children Play

You may think that all children have freedom to play. But for children who look differently from others or have physical disabilities, the idea of play can seem far away. An organization in Uganda is seeking to change that. Read on to learn words needed to talk about this sometimes difficult topic.

Video Indoor Pollution Kills Millions Each Year

WHO say nearly three billion people are unable to use clean fuels and technologies for cooking, heating and lighting. And they say more than seven million people die from exposure to indoor or outdoor air pollution each year. 4.3 million die from household air pollution given off by cookstoves.

Video Ebola Survivor Talks About His Experience

VOA recently welcomed health officials from West Africa and Ebola survivors. Read more for a Learning English interview with an Ebola survivor, Dr. Rick Sacra.

Learn with The News

  • Video Could Drones Help Save Rhinos in South Africa?

    Searching for illegal hunting is best done from above. But piloted flights are costly. Now, some college students have made a drone to look for poachers. It is low cost and can observe more places than other aircraft. South African officials may find drones a good tool in animal protection efforts. More

  • Audio Don't Panic!

    Actually ... seeing a Great White shark this close would be a great time to panic. Read on to learn about the Greek myth behind the work "panic" and some idioms. There is also a shortened section from "The Sea Wolf" by writer Jack London. He wrote one of the greatest panic attacks in literature. More

  • Princess Awesome clothes for little girls.

    Video New Girls' Clothing Line Breaks Stereotypes

    Many girls enjoy flowers, riding ponies and other girly things. However some girls also like cars, robots and spaceships Two mothers decided to make clothes that are more representative of all the things that little girls are, and do, and love. More

  • A Houthi Shiite fighter stands guard as people search for survivors under the rubble of houses destroyed by Saudi airstrikes near Sanaa Airport, Yemen, Thursday, March 26, 2015

    Audio Saudi-led Airstrikes in Yemen Aim to Stop Rebels

    Yemen Foreign Minister Riyadh Yasin said the Houthi rebels should weaken after two days of air strikes from a coalition of Arab countries, led by Saudi Arabia. The coalition of 10 countries, including five Gulf kingdoms, is trying to bring Yemen’s internationally recognized government back to power. More

  • Audio Cambodia Supports China's Position on South China Sea

    Cambodia’s prime minister said the dispute between China and other nations in the South China Sea area cannot be solved through ASEAN. Prime Minister Hun Sen said Wednesday that the issue should be solved by the countries directly affected by the disputes. More

Featured Stories

  • Audio New Treatment for AIDS Called a ‘Big Deal’

    Read on to learn words like mutate, neutralize and antiretroviral as you learn how researchers have found a way to trick HIV, the virus causing AIDS, into killing itself. The difficulty level might be high as this article describes what happens when a genetically modified cell become an HIV. More

  • Video Angelina Jolie Has Second Surgery to Prevent Cancer

    The 39-year-old actress published a piece in The New York Times about her decision to have her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed to protect herself from cancer. She had a double mastectomy two years ago for the same reason. The latest surgery leaves the mother of six unable to have more children. More

  • Space Rocket to Launch Weather Satellite Into Deep Space

    Video Satellite Will Watch Sun Storms, Send Warnings to Earth

    Strong storms on the sun can cause problems for satellites, radio communications and even airplane travel. A satellite is now traveling 1.5 million kilometers to enter the sun’s orbit, just in time to observe the extreme weather on the sun at its most violent time the sun’s 11-year cycle. More

  • An employee plays the game Flappy Bird at a smartphone store in Hanoi, Feb. 10, 2014.

    Audio Too Much Gaming is a Pain in the Neck

    Smartphones and other electronic devices, or gadgets, are becoming more affordable. Children in India are using them more and more. Doctors say children who spend long hours playing video games are increasingly showing signs of physical deformities, meaning their bodies are not growing properly. More

  • Video Secrets of a Saddle-Maker

    People began riding horses thousands of years ago. Saddles for horseback riding were invented soon after. Today, many companies manufacture saddles. But it is rare to find someone who designs and makes these products by hand. American Keith Valley is one of the few. More

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