May 05, 2015 22:26 UTC

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


11:36 PM - 11:40 PM April 30, 2015

3-D Printed Device Helps Children with Rare Breathing Disorder


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM April 28, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM April 21, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM April 14, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM April 07, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 31, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 24, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 17, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


6:28 PM - 6:31 PM March 16, 2015

Graphene: The Material of the 21st Century


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 10, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 03, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


8:57 PM - 9:10 PM March 01, 2015

'Three-Person Babies' Debate Goes Beyond Science and Religion


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM February 24, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM February 17, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM February 10, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


4:17 PM - 4:20 PM February 09, 2015

Can Smartphones Send Tastes, Smells, Touch Someday?


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM February 03, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM January 27, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM January 20, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM January 13, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.

    Audio Tuberculosis Found in 18th Century Bodies

    TB mostly affects poor people and those infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. But the opposite was true 2 ½ centuries ago, when the disease infected wealthy Europeans. Researchers say new findings could change how TB is treated today.

    Video Finding Hidden Cracks with Sound Waves

    Finding hidden cracks and other weak areas in large structures can be the difference between life and death. Researchers in Britain say they have discovered a new way to identify cracks inside metal parts before they fail. Their method involves using sound imaging.

    Video Robot Helps Heal Human Muscle Damage

    A Polish company has developed a robot that helps therapists. The robot tells therapists about their patients progress and can choose the best exercises to help rehabilitate people with injuries that affect movement. Egzotech expects to have other robots ready for sale later this year.

    Video Robot Scientist Helps Design New Drugs

    Robots are common in today’s world. They manufacture cars, work in space, explore oceans, clean up oil spills and investigate dangerous environments. And now, scientists at the University of Manchester are using a robot as a laboratory partner.

    Video Satellite Will Watch Sun Storms, Send Warnings to Earth

    Strong storms on the sun can cause problems for satellites, radio communications and even airplane travel. A satellite is now traveling 1.5 million kilometers to enter the sun’s orbit, just in time to observe the extreme weather on the sun at its most violent time the sun’s 11-year cycle.

    Video Graphene: The Material of the 21st Century

    Graphene is a type of graphite mineral. Experts often call it 'The Material of the 21st Century' because of its special properties. Some U.S. companies are already using graphene for new technology products. Graphene is often described as a one-atom-thick layer of carbon.

    Video Worms Get Ready to Fly in Space

    Humans are well-equipped for life on Earth. But in space, it is a different story. Low or zero gravity changes how the blood flows and causes motion sickness. But scientists at the University of Delaware are experimenting with little worms to better understand how space travel affects astronauts.

    Video Many Life Forms Discovered Deep under Antarctic Ice

    Scientists say they have found fish and other aquatic creatures living under icy waters in Antarctica. They made the announcement after completing three months of research at the Ross Ice Shelf, the world’s largest floating ice sheet. This is the farthest south that fish have ever been seen.

    Audio 'Three-Person Babies' Debate Goes Beyond Science and Religion

    Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy uses the genetic material from three people to create babies. The stated purpose of the therapy is to help mothers avoid passing genetic mutations to their babies. Some say MRT will lead to 'designer babies.' Others say it is dangerous, immoral or just wrong.

    Audio Capturing CO2 Is Costly and Difficult

    Most scientists agree that increasing amounts of carbon-dioxide gas in the atmosphere is partly to blame for climate change. Climate change can have a big effect on weather conditions around the world. Scientists are looking for the best and least costly methods for capturing the gas.

    Video 'White Spaces' Gives Ghanaians Less Costly Internet

    Broadband Internet service can be costly. Some countries do not have the high-speed Internet because of the costs involved. But Microsoft Corporation and other companies have found a way to bring low-cost, high-speed Internet service to Ghana using high and ultra-high frequency bands.

    Video A New Camera Records Invisible Motion

    The world is in never-ending motion, even when objects seem to be perfectly still. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology use a special camera that shows these seemingly invisible movements. Many objects around us vibrate when hit by sound waves.

    Video New technology Stops Illegal Fishing on the Seas

    Experts estimate that one out of every five fish sold was caught illegally. They say the illegal fishing market is worth $23.5 billion a year. It threatens food security and hurts the environment. Officials are using new observational technology to fight illegal fishing.

    Video Can Smartphones Send Tastes, Smells, Touch Someday?

    Scientists have already produced sour, salty, sweet and bitter tastes that could be sent wirelessly. Professor Adrian David Cheok says he hopes devices like these will someday be added to houses. He says they may change the future of long-distance communication.

    Video French Farmers Are Using Drones to Examine Their Crops

    It used to be mostly the military that used small, unpiloted aircraft, called “drones.” The little planes were very costly. But as they have dropped in price more people have begun to use them. Rescue workers and farmers are among the new users. The drones save money and time.

    Video Is There a Better Way to Track Passenger Planes?

    New technology could help to more closely follow passenger airplanes, and find them when they crash; international group to meet next month to discuss changes. Airline industry leaders and regulators want to improve airplane safety. They want better, more dependable tracking devices.

    Video TechShop Puts High-Tech Dreams Within Reach

    Members of TechShop use high-tech equipment to develop and produce ideas they have for inventions. Members are able to use costly machines including 3D modeling tools and laser cutters. Membership costs for TechShop start at just over $100 per month. | Science in the News

    Audio New Camera Takes Billions of Pictures Every Second

    The speed of light is almost 300 million meters per second. At that speed, it would take just one second to travel around the entire world seven-and-a-half times. A biomedical engineer and his team of researchers can now photograph light particles moving at that speed using a unique camera.

    Video New Artificial Skin Feels Like Real Skin

    Some recently developed mechanical hands can be controlled by thoughts. But people who wear them must use their sight to know what they are touching. So scientists in the United States and South Korea have developed an artificial skin that lets people know more about objects they touch.

    Video Robots as Fast as Cheetahs?

    Scientists have been experimenting with four-legged robots for years. But providing enough power for those kinds of robots has been a problem. Now, that has changed. Engineers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have designed a running robot that operates on batteries.

Learn with The News

  • Audio US Senate Considering Bill on Iran’s Nuclear Activities

    This week could decide what happens to a bipartisan bill in the United States Senate. If approved, the measure would delay an easing of American sanctions against Iran. Congress would have 30 days to study a final nuclear agreement with Iran before the restrictions are lifted. More

  • Chief Secretary Carrie Lam is seen on a TV screen as she unveils the Beijing-backed election reform package’s details at the legislative chamber in Hong Kong, April 22, 2015.

    Audio Hong Kong Lawmakers Promise to Block Election Plan

    Democracy activists say they want more control over who will lead the city; mainland China has said it will permit a leader to be chosen only from a list of candidates it chooses. More

  • Braeside Meat Market Butchers in Johannesburg, South Africa

    Audio Johannesburg Gets a Taste for Japan's Kobe Beef

    Demand is rising in Johannesburg for Kobe beef. Top cooks and professional meat cutters say it is the best beef in the world. It is definitely the most costly. As its wealth increases in Johannesburg,so does the tastes of its residents. The beef comes from Wagyu cattle in Japan’s Kobe region. More

  • Volunteers created a a food bank for people in the neighborhoods that were affected by the Baltimore riots.

    Video Volunteers Aid Victims of Riots in Baltimore

    There were riots in parts of the city after a funeral was held for an African-American man who died after being arrested. The city is working to get back to normal after a week of violence. Volunteers are helping people in the neighborhoods that were affected by the unrest. More

  • A displaced earthquake victim carries food and water after collecting them from a distribution center at an open ground, in Kathmandu, Nepal, May 4, 2015.

    Audio US Expanding Aid Efforts in Nepal

    U.S. military aircraft, heavy equipment and air traffic controllers arrived in the capital, Kathmandu, on Sunday. They will be used to help transport aid to earthquake victims. They are working to reach the areas that have received little help since the 7.8-magnitude quake struck on April 25th. More

Featured Stories

  • Audio 3-D Printed Device Helps Children with Rare Breathing Disorder

    University of Michigan researchers have develop what they are calling a 4-D medical device to help children with a rare condition. The device is designed for very young children and changes as their bodies grow. More

  • World Trade Center Reopening

    Audio The 25 Most Popular Cities to Visit in America

    Big cities and small historic towns top the list of most popular places to visit in America, according to the travel site TripAdvisor. Millions of users voted New York City, Chicago, and Charleston, South Carolina as the top three cities to visit in the U.S. Here's a look at all 25 cities! More

  • Video S.O.S. – In Other Words, Help!

    Language, as we know, is always changing. New words are often created, officially and unofficially, without anyone knowing about them. Read on to learn a word that many Americans do not know. Here is a clue: S.O.S. is one. More

  • Everyday Grammar - Double Negatives

    Audio Everyday Grammar: Double Negatives - Can't Get None?

    In this week’s episode of Everyday Grammar, we’re going to talk about two common types of double negatives. A double negative is when you use two negative words in the same clause of a sentence. Sometimes two negatives make a statement positive; sometimes two negatives form a stronger negative. More

  • Kate Chopin

    Video Athenaise by Kate Chopin

    Our story today is called "Athenaise" by Kate Chopin. Women in the United States long wanted to be independent. This classic American Story tells about a young married woman in the Bayou of Louisiana who questions her role as a wife. Can she have her personal liberty and stay married to Mr. Cazeau? More

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