August 31, 2015 04:43 UTC

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


9:11 PM - 9:14 PM August 27, 2015

Fewer Creatures in Future Oceans Could Provide Less Food


9:35 PM - 9:38 PM August 19, 2015

Honeybees Are Disappearing, and No One Knows Why


8:20 PM - 8:23 PM August 19, 2015

Scientists Work to Understand Earth's Magnetic Field


5:54 PM - 5:58 PM August 07, 2015

Urgent Move to Freeze DNA Before Creatures Die Off


3:00 PM - 3:03 PM July 29, 2015

Simulation Technology Helps Control and Manage Traffic


10:48 PM - 10:52 PM July 22, 2015

Why Do Mosquitoes Choose to Bite You?


2:30 PM - 2:34 PM June 26, 2015

Robots Ready to Work in Restaurants


2:07 PM - 2:12 PM June 03, 2015

Plankton More Important than Scientists Thought


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM May 26, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM May 19, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM May 12, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


6:28 PM - 6:38 PM May 08, 2015

Antibiotic Resistance Found in Amazon Tribe


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM May 05, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


11:36 PM - 11:40 PM April 30, 2015

3-D Printed Device Helps Children with Rare Breathing Disorder


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM April 28, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM April 21, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM April 14, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM April 07, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 31, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 24, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.

    Video Scientists Work to Understand Earth's Magnetic Field

    Most of us rarely think about the earth's magnetic field. We might know that it helps guide birds as they travel and keeps our compasses pointing north. But, the magnetic field is much more. It is one of the main components that make life on the planet possible.

    Video Honeybees Are Disappearing, No One Knows Why

    Entomologists -- scientists who study insects -- are working with other scientists to learn why bee colonies are dying in the United States. They call the problem “colony collapse disorder.” Bees play a role in a third of our food. People are volunteering to help these important insects survive.

    Video US Company Developing Space-Based Plane Tracking

    Experts say ground-based radar is unable to track about 70% of aircraft flights. This is one reason Malaysia Airways Flight 370 plane has not been found. Now, there are plans to deploy aircraft tracking satellites into space so that no plane will ever be "lost" again.

    Video Futuristic Transport System Moves Closer to Reality

    In the United States, a company is working on a project that could change the way we think about public transportation. Its planned system would move people around in steel tubes. Those passengers would be travelling at speeds of up to 1,200 kilometers per hour.

    Video Scientists Aim to Freeze DNA Before Creatures Die Off

    Earth is in the middle of its sixth mass extinction. Now, scientists are in a race against time to classify the estimated 11 million species alive today. Yet only about two million species are known to science. Researchers are worried many will disappear before they even have a name.

    Audio Study Finds 182 Tigers Left in World’s Biggest Natural Habitat

    A tiger population count in 2004 found 440 tigers in the Bangladeshi part of the Sundarbans forest, the world’s largest mangrove forest. The new census found that only about 100 tigers are left in the Sundarbans forest of Bangladesh.

    Video Simulation Helps Control, Manage Traffic

    Controlling traffic is a complex and high cost problem in many developed countries. It becomes more difficult and costly with the ever-increasing number of cars on the roads. But scientists and students at CATT at the University of Maryland are working to solve that problem.

    Video Solar Activity Can Affect Communication, Power on Earth

    Scientists who study the sun watch for sunspots -- violent storms that can affect communications, navigation systems and even electric power stations on Earth. Sunspots are a product of huge electromagnetic storms on the sun. Scientists can observe them eight minutes after they happen.

    Video Changing Arctic Conditions Threaten Polar Bears

    Researchers, following the animals on the Arctic, discovered sea ice is melting faster than predicted, making it harder for polar bears to survive. They are calling on nations to reduce greenhouse gases. If that does not happen, polar bears could one day disappear from our planet.

    Audio Why Do Mosquitoes Choose to Bite You?

    Mosquitoes need blood to survive and their favorite target is humans. They are completely driven by smell. How do they find their victims and why do they prefer some people more than others? New research now shows how mosquitoes choose who to bite.

    Video Bladeless Wind Generator Safe for Birds

    Wind turbines are tall structures with large blades used to produce electricity. They are useful sources of low-cost, renewable energy. But they can also be deadly to birds and bats that fly near the wind turbines. But a new type of wind generator may offer an answer to that problem.

    Video Fish Use Whole Bodies When They Eat

    Fish are animals that live in the water. They are also vertebrates – animals that have a backbone and a spine. Have you ever wonder how vertebrates eat food? Now researchers at Brown University have x-ray video that shown the action and why vertebrates use its whole body to eat.

    Video Defending Spacecraft and Astronauts Against Dust

    Our Milky Way solar system began as small pieces of star-created gas and dust. Scientists are studying this dust with a student-designed instrument on the American space agency’s New Horizons spacecraft. The agency is busy collecting information from the spacecraft this week in the first-ever flyby.

    Video Personal Flying Vehicles Close to Reality

    Many people have long dreamed of being able to fly around as simply as riding a bicycle. Yet the safety and strength of a flying bike was always a big problem. Over the past 10 years, developments in technology have moved the dream of personal flying vehicles closer to reality.

    Video New Device May Help Jet Pilots

    While flying high above Earth’s surface, jet fighter pilots may suffer loss of eyesight for brief periods. Some pilots may even lose consciousness. These experiences, commonly called blackouts, can lead to tragic results. An Israeli company may have developed a device that could save pilots’ lives.

    Video Robots Ready to Work in Restaurants

    For many years, machines have been doing work that people once did, including some difficult jobs. Search and rescue operations employ high technology robots. But there is another area that may soon take jobs traditionally held by human beings: the restaurant industry.

    Video Scientists Developing Technology to Recreate Crime Scenes

    Police and prosecutors sometime recreate crime scenes in an effort to better understand complex cases. Now, scientists in Switzerland are developing virtual reality technologies to recreate crimes scenes. The scientists say these computer-made images can be used for quality recreations of events.

    Video Scientists: Rising Sea Levels to Continue

    An exhibit at the Aquarium of the Pacific warns the level of the sea around the world could rise by one meter by 2100. Now, scientists are calling for coastal communities to find new way to adapt including new building designs and floating structures.

    Video Robot Security Could Help Cut Crime

    Shopping centers, stadiums and universities may soon have a new tool to help fight crime. A California company called Knightscope says its robots can predict and prevent crime. Knightscope says the goal is to reduce crime by half in the areas where the robots patrol.

    Audio Damaged Robots Learn to Make Changes to Keep Working

    When a dog loses a leg, the animal eventually figures out the best way to get around on three legs. In a short time, the dog learns deal with its physical disability. Now, scientists have developed robots that behave in much the same way. They learn to find a way to deal with the damage.

Learn with The News

  • Audio Serena Williams Chasing History at US Open

    The U.S. Open tennis tournament begins Monday in New York City. It is the last opportunity for 127 women to win a ‘Grand Slam’ title this year. And it is a chance for one player, Serena Williams, to win a place in history. A victory would give Williams a rare 'calendar-year Grand Slam.' More

  • Diana Kuya is a student at the University of Nairobi.  She plans to start her own agribusiness once she graduates.

    Video More Kenyans Exploring Agricultural Businesses

    Kenya is facing high unemployment rates. Recent college graduates face a difficult time in finding a job. Now, more and more Kenyan university graduates are planning to start pursuing agricultural business -- 'agribusiness'-- as way to have their own business and make money. More

  • Video Student Develops Gun Unlocked by Fingerprint

    Kai Kloepfer has a talent for technology. He has been teaching himself engineering skills since he was a child. He decided to create a gun designed to prevent accidental shootings. More

  • Audio Is China’s Economic Information Correct?

    An American expert on China says the Chinese government is not influencing information about the country’s economic growth. He believes that the economy is changing quickly. And he says the ways of measuring new economic activity is unable to keep up with the changes. More

  • Audio Ten Years after Katrina, New Orleans Is a Different City

    On the anniversary of storm, President Obama and other officials recognize efforts to remake a city famous for its culture and music. More

Featured Stories

  • Audio Everyday Grammar: Fun with Future Tenses

    English has several ways to talk about the future. It's one of the most flexible tenses in English. We visit some popular songs for examples of the future forms. Read and listen as the Everyday Grammar team shows you six ways to express an event in the future. You will not regret it! More

  • Video A Horseman in the Sky by Ambrose Bierce

    Carter Druse lived in Virginia, a southern state during the American Civil War. He had a tough decision to make - should he join the Confederate Army or the Union Army? Read this classic American Story to find out what decision he makes, and what it means to his father and fellow soldiers. More

  • Audio Betty Azar, 'Rock Star' of English Grammar

    It all started with a question from a student. The year was 1965. Betty Azar was teaching her first English as a Second Language class at the University of Iowa. A student from the Middle East asked Ms. Azar, “Why can’t I put a in front of water?’ As in ‘I drank a water.’” More

  • Audio Millions with Mental Illness Get Little or No Treatment

    The World Health Organization reports that hundreds of millions of people worldwide have a mental disorder. However, the WHO adds that most get little or no treatment. Learn the vocabulary needed to talk about this important study. More

  • Hoarding

    Video Could Organizing Your Home Change Your Life?

    A new movement in the United States is all about clearing away unnecessary things in your life. A Japanese cleaning expert on clutter is now the hot topic on playgrounds, at work and parties. But can cleaning out clutter really help you succeed at your job or lose weight? Read on to learn more. More

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