June 30, 2015 03:29 UTC

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


2:30 PM - 2:34 PM June 26, 2015

Robots Ready to Work in Restaurants


2:07 PM - 2:12 PM June 03, 2015

Plankton More Important than Scientists Thought


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM May 26, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM May 19, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM May 12, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


6:28 PM - 6:38 PM May 08, 2015

Antibiotic Resistance Found in Amazon Tribe


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM May 05, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


11:36 PM - 11:40 PM April 30, 2015

3-D Printed Device Helps Children with Rare Breathing Disorder


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM April 28, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM April 21, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM April 14, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM April 07, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 31, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 24, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 17, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


6:28 PM - 6:31 PM March 16, 2015

Graphene: The Material of the 21st Century


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 10, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 03, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


8:57 PM - 9:10 PM March 01, 2015

'Three-Person Babies' Debate Goes Beyond Science and Religion


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM February 24, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.

    Video Robots Ready to Work in Restaurants

    For many years, machines have been doing work that people once did, including some difficult jobs. Search and rescue operations employ high technology robots. But there is another area that may soon take jobs traditionally held by human beings: the restaurant industry.

    Video Scientists Developing Technology to Recreate Crime Scenes

    Police and prosecutors sometime recreate crime scenes in an effort to better understand complex cases. Now, scientists in Switzerland are developing virtual reality technologies to recreate crimes scenes. The scientists say these computer-made images can be used for quality recreations of events.

    Video Scientists: Rising Sea Levels to Continue

    An exhibit at the Aquarium of the Pacific warns the level of the sea around the world could rise by one meter by 2100. Now, scientists are calling for coastal communities to find new way to adapt including new building designs and floating structures.

    Video Robot Security Could Help Cut Crime

    Shopping centers, stadiums and universities may soon have a new tool to help fight crime. A California company called Knightscope says its robots can predict and prevent crime. Knightscope says the goal is to reduce crime by half in the areas where the robots patrol.

    Audio Damaged Robots Learn to Make Changes to Keep Working

    When a dog loses a leg, the animal eventually figures out the best way to get around on three legs. In a short time, the dog learns deal with its physical disability. Now, scientists have developed robots that behave in much the same way. They learn to find a way to deal with the damage.

    Video Plankton More Important than Scientists Thought

    Plankton are a group of different ocean creatures, algae, bacteria and other organisms. A four-year-long study shows that the small organisms are not just food for whales and other sea creatures. It found that plankton are a major provider of oxygen for our planet.

    Audio Scientists Testing Space Propulsion by Light

    Can the sun provide power for a spaceship to travel to the edge of our solar system? The answer may come from a small satellite. The satellite is designed to test the effectiveness of what is called solar sail propulsion.

    Video New Tool Maps Buildings' Energy Efficiency

    Architects, engineers and building supervisors will soon be able to quickly collect information that once took weeks to measure and process. Scientists have developed a device to gather information about building interiors – the design and exact measurements of a building.

    Audio Antibiotic Resistance Found in Amazon Tribe

    Scientists were shocked to find antibiotic-resistant bacteria on people with no known contact with Western civilization. Find out why this is worrying to scientists and the danger this may bring to fighting disease worldwide. This is an advanced level story with complex medical terms.

    Video Surgical Glue Approved for Use Inside the Body

    The new medical glue can hold tissue together. TissueGlu is the first glue to be approved for use in medical operations. The developers say it is biodegradable meaning it breaks down inside the body.

    Audio Tuberculosis Found in 18th Century Bodies

    TB mostly affects poor people and those infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. But the opposite was true 2 ½ centuries ago, when the disease infected wealthy Europeans. Researchers say new findings could change how TB is treated today.

    Video Finding Hidden Cracks with Sound Waves

    Finding hidden cracks and other weak areas in large structures can be the difference between life and death. Researchers in Britain say they have discovered a new way to identify cracks inside metal parts before they fail. Their method involves using sound imaging.

    Video Robot Helps Heal Human Muscle Damage

    A Polish company has developed a robot that helps therapists. The robot tells therapists about their patients progress and can choose the best exercises to help rehabilitate people with injuries that affect movement. Egzotech expects to have other robots ready for sale later this year.

    Video Robot Scientist Helps Design New Drugs

    Robots are common in today’s world. They manufacture cars, work in space, explore oceans, clean up oil spills and investigate dangerous environments. And now, scientists at the University of Manchester are using a robot as a laboratory partner.

    Video Satellite Will Watch Sun Storms, Send Warnings to Earth

    Strong storms on the sun can cause problems for satellites, radio communications and even airplane travel. A satellite is now traveling 1.5 million kilometers to enter the sun’s orbit, just in time to observe the extreme weather on the sun at its most violent time the sun’s 11-year cycle.

    Video Graphene: The Material of the 21st Century

    Graphene is a type of graphite mineral. Experts often call it 'The Material of the 21st Century' because of its special properties. Some U.S. companies are already using graphene for new technology products. Graphene is often described as a one-atom-thick layer of carbon.

    Video Worms Get Ready to Fly in Space

    Humans are well-equipped for life on Earth. But in space, it is a different story. Low or zero gravity changes how the blood flows and causes motion sickness. But scientists at the University of Delaware are experimenting with little worms to better understand how space travel affects astronauts.

    Video Many Life Forms Discovered Deep under Antarctic Ice

    Scientists say they have found fish and other aquatic creatures living under icy waters in Antarctica. They made the announcement after completing three months of research at the Ross Ice Shelf, the world’s largest floating ice sheet. This is the farthest south that fish have ever been seen.

    Audio 'Three-Person Babies' Debate Goes Beyond Science and Religion

    Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy uses the genetic material from three people to create babies. The stated purpose of the therapy is to help mothers avoid passing genetic mutations to their babies. Some say MRT will lead to 'designer babies.' Others say it is dangerous, immoral or just wrong.

    Audio Capturing CO2 Is Costly and Difficult

    Most scientists agree that increasing amounts of carbon-dioxide gas in the atmosphere is partly to blame for climate change. Climate change can have a big effect on weather conditions around the world. Scientists are looking for the best and least costly methods for capturing the gas.

Learn with The News

  • Audio China to Prepare Private Ships for Military Use

    China is forcing private shipbuilders to build civilian vessels that can be used by the military during times of conflict. Experts say the new “dual-purpose” ships will strengthen China’s efforts to claim territory in disputed areas of the East and South China Seas. More

  • Video Motorcycle Lovers: We Are Not Criminals

    But police say some motorcycle gang members are violent lawbreakers. Some gangs say they have been operating for many years and have never been charged with crimes. “It is no different than a ladies tennis club,” they say. | As It Is More

  • Audio Study Explores Air Pollution’s Deadly, Preventable Effects

    A new report says cleaning up dirty air could prevent up to 2.1 million premature deaths every year. Most of those deaths are said to be in Asian countries. The report notes that many people also are dying at an early age in countries with cleaner skies. Read on to learn about “particulate matter." More

  • U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and U.S. Under Secretary for Political Affairs Wendy Sherman (L-3rd L) meet with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif (2nd R) at a hotel in Vienna, Austria, June 28, 2015.

    Audio Time Limit for Agreement Expected to Pass in Iran Nuclear Talks

    There will likely not be an agreement with Iran to limit its nuclear activities by June 30. Also, banks and money machines close in Greece; Asia Infrastructure Bank is officially established; US rocket going to International Space Station explodes; and second escaped NY prisoner is found, shot. More

  • Video Nigerian Immigrant Lives the American Dream

    Lookman Afolayan Mashood came to the United States in 1996 and is now a U.S. citizen. About five years ago, he and his girlfriend, Natalie Goldberg, opened their own restaurant in Brooklyn. He says the American dream is still alive. And he says “there’s no food compared to Nigerian food.” More

Featured Stories

  • Video Robots Ready to Work in Restaurants

    For many years, machines have been doing work that people once did, including some difficult jobs. Search and rescue operations employ high technology robots. But there is another area that may soon take jobs traditionally held by human beings: the restaurant industry. More

  • Audio More American Fathers Stay Home to Raise Kids

    More and more fathers in the United States are trading in the traditional role of breadwinner -- the person earning money -- for the role of stay-at-home dad. Meet two fathers who have been on this road for the past decade. You can also learn some great words such as "clique" and "masculinity." More

  • Audio Don't Be Caught With Your Pants Down

    Are you too big for your boots? Do you often fly by the seat of your pants? Learn what these clothing expressions mean and so many others. You may be excited to get started but keep your shirt on! Be patient. All you have to do is click on this episode of Words and Their Stories. More

  • Video Everyday Grammar: Words Come and Go in English

    Part of the reason that English has grown as a world language is that it adjusts easily to change. Why do some words and phrases stay the same while others change? VOA guest editor David Sullivan shares his ideas on the changes he has seen in today's English. More

  • Video 'Jurassic World' Sells $1 Billion Worth of Tickets

    The movie continues the series that began in the 1990s. It already is the second most popular movie of 2015. Critics praise the new film as exciting. A group of paleontologists praised the film as well. But they said they found the science behind the dinosaur story to be weak. More

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