July 31, 2015 19:24 UTC

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:48 PM - 10:52 PM July 22, 2015

Why Do Mosquitoes Choose to Bite You?


2:30 PM - 2:34 PM June 26, 2015

Robots Ready to Work in Restaurants


2:07 PM - 2:12 PM June 03, 2015

Plankton More Important than Scientists Thought


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM May 26, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM May 19, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM May 12, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


6:28 PM - 6:38 PM May 08, 2015

Antibiotic Resistance Found in Amazon Tribe


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM May 05, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


11:36 PM - 11:40 PM April 30, 2015

3-D Printed Device Helps Children with Rare Breathing Disorder


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM April 28, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM April 21, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM April 14, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM April 07, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 31, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 24, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 17, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


6:28 PM - 6:31 PM March 16, 2015

Graphene: The Material of the 21st Century


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 10, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 03, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


8:57 PM - 9:10 PM March 01, 2015

'Three-Person Babies' Debate Goes Beyond Science and Religion

    Video Changing Arctic Conditions Threaten Polar Bears

    Researchers, following the animals on the Arctic, discovered sea ice is melting faster than predicted, making it harder for polar bears to survive. They are calling on nations to reduce greenhouse gases. If that does not happen, polar bears could one day disappear from our planet.

    Audio Why Do Mosquitoes Choose to Bite You?

    Mosquitoes need blood to survive and their favorite target is humans. They are completely driven by smell. How do they find their victims and why do they prefer some people more than others? New research now shows how mosquitoes choose who to bite.

    Video Bladeless Wind Generator Safe for Birds

    Wind turbines are tall structures with large blades used to produce electricity. They are useful sources of low-cost, renewable energy. But they can also be deadly to birds and bats that fly near the wind turbines. But a new type of wind generator may offer an answer to that problem.

    Video Fish Use Whole Bodies When They Eat

    Fish are animals that live in the water. They are also vertebrates – animals that have a backbone and a spine. Have you ever wonder how vertebrates eat food? Now researchers at Brown University have x-ray video that shown the action and why vertebrates use its whole body to eat.

    Video Defending Spacecraft and Astronauts Against Dust

    Our Milky Way solar system began as small pieces of star-created gas and dust. Scientists are studying this dust with a student-designed instrument on the American space agency’s New Horizons spacecraft. The agency is busy collecting information from the spacecraft this week in the first-ever flyby.

    Video Personal Flying Vehicles Close to Reality

    Many people have long dreamed of being able to fly around as simply as riding a bicycle. Yet the safety and strength of a flying bike was always a big problem. Over the past 10 years, developments in technology have moved the dream of personal flying vehicles closer to reality.

    Video New Device May Help Jet Pilots

    While flying high above Earth’s surface, jet fighter pilots may suffer loss of eyesight for brief periods. Some pilots may even lose consciousness. These experiences, commonly called blackouts, can lead to tragic results. An Israeli company may have developed a device that could save pilots’ lives.

    Video Robots Ready to Work in Restaurants

    For many years, machines have been doing work that people once did, including some difficult jobs. Search and rescue operations employ high technology robots. But there is another area that may soon take jobs traditionally held by human beings: the restaurant industry.

    Video Scientists Developing Technology to Recreate Crime Scenes

    Police and prosecutors sometime recreate crime scenes in an effort to better understand complex cases. Now, scientists in Switzerland are developing virtual reality technologies to recreate crimes scenes. The scientists say these computer-made images can be used for quality recreations of events.

    Video Scientists: Rising Sea Levels to Continue

    An exhibit at the Aquarium of the Pacific warns the level of the sea around the world could rise by one meter by 2100. Now, scientists are calling for coastal communities to find new way to adapt including new building designs and floating structures.

    Video Robot Security Could Help Cut Crime

    Shopping centers, stadiums and universities may soon have a new tool to help fight crime. A California company called Knightscope says its robots can predict and prevent crime. Knightscope says the goal is to reduce crime by half in the areas where the robots patrol.

    Audio Damaged Robots Learn to Make Changes to Keep Working

    When a dog loses a leg, the animal eventually figures out the best way to get around on three legs. In a short time, the dog learns deal with its physical disability. Now, scientists have developed robots that behave in much the same way. They learn to find a way to deal with the damage.

    Video Plankton More Important than Scientists Thought

    Plankton are a group of different ocean creatures, algae, bacteria and other organisms. A four-year-long study shows that the small organisms are not just food for whales and other sea creatures. It found that plankton are a major provider of oxygen for our planet.

    Audio Scientists Testing Space Propulsion by Light

    Can the sun provide power for a spaceship to travel to the edge of our solar system? The answer may come from a small satellite. The satellite is designed to test the effectiveness of what is called solar sail propulsion.

    Video New Tool Maps Buildings' Energy Efficiency

    Architects, engineers and building supervisors will soon be able to quickly collect information that once took weeks to measure and process. Scientists have developed a device to gather information about building interiors – the design and exact measurements of a building.

    Audio Antibiotic Resistance Found in Amazon Tribe

    Scientists were shocked to find antibiotic-resistant bacteria on people with no known contact with Western civilization. Find out why this is worrying to scientists and the danger this may bring to fighting disease worldwide. This is an advanced level story with complex medical terms.

    Video Surgical Glue Approved for Use Inside the Body

    The new medical glue can hold tissue together. TissueGlu is the first glue to be approved for use in medical operations. The developers say it is biodegradable meaning it breaks down inside the body.

    Audio Tuberculosis Found in 18th Century Bodies

    TB mostly affects poor people and those infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. But the opposite was true 2 ½ centuries ago, when the disease infected wealthy Europeans. Researchers say new findings could change how TB is treated today.

    Video Finding Hidden Cracks with Sound Waves

    Finding hidden cracks and other weak areas in large structures can be the difference between life and death. Researchers in Britain say they have discovered a new way to identify cracks inside metal parts before they fail. Their method involves using sound imaging.

    Video Robot Helps Heal Human Muscle Damage

    A Polish company has developed a robot that helps therapists. The robot tells therapists about their patients progress and can choose the best exercises to help rehabilitate people with injuries that affect movement. Egzotech expects to have other robots ready for sale later this year.

Learn with The News

  • Audio China Holding Military Exercises in South China Sea

    China’s state media say the exercises took place Tuesday and more are to begin Saturday. Some U.S. and international security experts think China may be preparing to establish an air defense identification area in the South China Sea. | As It Is More

  • Video Wreckage Could Be From Missing Malaysia Airlines Flight

    An airplane part about two meters long was on Reunion Island, 3,500 kilometers from where the flight was last heard from. Now, investigators are trying to find out if it really is part of the plane that went missing in March 2014. The piece is about two meters long. It appears to be a flaperon. More

  • A shot from student documentary 'I, too, Am BCC'

    Video US Student Filmmakers Fight Racial Stereotypes

    Three high school students in Maryland explore the problems that can result from having beliefs about people based only on their race. The film project is based on minority students talking about their thoughts and experiences. The producers show the film in classrooms and hold discussions after. More

  • Audio Taliban Confirms Death of Leader Mullah Omar

    Also Thursday, the Nigerian army said it rescued 59 hostages in a raid on Boko Haram hideouts; an American voter study shows businessman Donald Trump with a big lead in the Republican Party presidential race; And, the US government is investigating the killing in Zimbabwe of the beloved lion, Cecil. More

  • Myanmar hopes to replace poppies with coffee

    Audio In Myanmar, Replacing Poppy Plants with Coffee

    Myanmar’s Shan State is the second-largest opium-producing area in the world. But the area's poppy farmers are now earning less for their crops, as the price of poppy fluctuates. Now, the United Nations is hoping many farmers in Shan State will decide to grow coffee instead. More

Featured Stories

  • Audio Study: Smoking May Increase Risk of Schizophrenia

    Researchers reviewed 61 studies from around the world; they discovered cigarette smoking is three times more common among those with schizophrenia who were receiving medical care for the illness for the first time compared to people who did not have the mental disorder. More

  • Audio Folk to Rock: When Dylan Went Electric

    Fifty years ago, folk music legend Bob Dylan rocked out at the Newport Folk Festival in Rhode Island on an electric guitar. He was widely booed. The audience may have been unhappy with Dylan’s performance that day, but it changed the direction of music and culture in the United States. More

  • Audio Why Do Mosquitoes Choose to Bite You?

    Mosquitoes need blood to survive and their favorite target is humans. They are completely driven by smell. How do they find their victims and why do they prefer some people more than others? New research now shows how mosquitoes choose who to bite. More

  • 'You're Giving Me the Creeps!'

    "You're giving me the ...!" The jitters, the creeps, the willies, the heebie-jeebies, goose bumps, butterflies, and a heart attack ... you can give all these things to other people. Are they good or bad? Read on to find out! More

  • Audio Everyday Grammar: Can I, Could I, May I?

    English teachers and parents used to try very hard to get young people to use "may" when asking for permission. Now it seems that "can" or "could" works just as well. Learn about the rules for asking permission with these modals. More

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