March 07, 2015 01:38 UTC

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 03, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


8:57 PM - 9:10 PM March 01, 2015

'Three-Person Babies' Debate Goes Beyond Science and Religion


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM February 24, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM February 17, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM February 10, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


4:17 PM - 4:20 PM February 09, 2015

Can Smartphones Send Tastes, Smells, Touch Someday?


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM February 03, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM January 27, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM January 20, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM January 13, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


8:11 PM - 8:14 PM January 12, 2015

New Artificial Skin Feels Like Real Skin


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM January 06, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM December 30, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM December 23, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM December 16, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


3:47 PM - 3:51 PM December 10, 2014

Astronauts to Drink Out-of-this-World Coffee


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM December 09, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


10:12 PM - 10:16 PM December 09, 2014

Astronauts to Get Out-of-this-World Coffee


10:37 PM - 10:41 PM December 05, 2014

Tiny Needles Treat Eye Disease


5:32 PM - 5:36 PM December 03, 2014

Is a Working Fusion Nuclear Reactor Coming Soon?

    Audio 'Three-Person Babies' Debate Goes Beyond Science and Religion

    Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy uses the genetic material from three people to create babies. The stated purpose of the therapy is to help mothers avoid passing genetic mutations to their babies. Some say MRT will lead to 'designer babies.' Others say it is dangerous, immoral or just wrong.

    Audio Capturing CO2 Is Costly and Difficult

    Most scientists agree that increasing amounts of carbon-dioxide gas in the atmosphere is partly to blame for climate change. Climate change can have a big effect on weather conditions around the world. Scientists are looking for the best and least costly methods for capturing the gas.

    Video 'White Spaces' Gives Ghanaians Less Costly Internet

    Broadband Internet service can be costly. Some countries do not have the high-speed Internet because of the costs involved. But Microsoft Corporation and other companies have found a way to bring low-cost, high-speed Internet service to Ghana using high and ultra-high frequency bands.

    Video A New Camera Records Invisible Motion

    The world is in never-ending motion, even when objects seem to be perfectly still. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology use a special camera that shows these seemingly invisible movements. Many objects around us vibrate when hit by sound waves.

    Video New technology Stops Illegal Fishing on the Seas

    Experts estimate that one out of every five fish sold was caught illegally. They say the illegal fishing market is worth $23.5 billion a year. It threatens food security and hurts the environment. Officials are using new observational technology to fight illegal fishing.

    Video Can Smartphones Send Tastes, Smells, Touch Someday?

    Scientists have already produced sour, salty, sweet and bitter tastes that could be sent wirelessly. Professor Adrian David Cheok says he hopes devices like these will someday be added to houses. He says they may change the future of long-distance communication.

    Video French Farmers Are Using Drones to Examine Their Crops

    It used to be mostly the military that used small, unpiloted aircraft, called “drones.” The little planes were very costly. But as they have dropped in price more people have begun to use them. Rescue workers and farmers are among the new users. The drones save money and time.

    Video Is There a Better Way to Track Passenger Planes?

    New technology could help to more closely follow passenger airplanes, and find them when they crash; international group to meet next month to discuss changes. Airline industry leaders and regulators want to improve airplane safety. They want better, more dependable tracking devices.

    Video TechShop Puts High-Tech Dreams Within Reach

    Members of TechShop use high-tech equipment to develop and produce ideas they have for inventions. Members are able to use costly machines including 3D modeling tools and laser cutters. Membership costs for TechShop start at just over $100 per month. | Science in the News

    Audio New Camera Takes Billions of Pictures Every Second

    The speed of light is almost 300 million meters per second. At that speed, it would take just one second to travel around the entire world seven-and-a-half times. A biomedical engineer and his team of researchers can now photograph light particles moving at that speed using a unique camera.

    Video New Artificial Skin Feels Like Real Skin

    Some recently developed mechanical hands can be controlled by thoughts. But people who wear them must use their sight to know what they are touching. So scientists in the United States and South Korea have developed an artificial skin that lets people know more about objects they touch.

    Video Robots as Fast as Cheetahs?

    Scientists have been experimenting with four-legged robots for years. But providing enough power for those kinds of robots has been a problem. Now, that has changed. Engineers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have designed a running robot that operates on batteries.

    Video Robot Finds Unexploded Underwater Mines

    Many teachers believe that “hands-on” experience is the best way to learn. A group of students in the U.S. is putting that belief to the test. The students are with the Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey. They successfully designed and built a robot to find underwater mines.

    Audio Study: Regular Exercise Can Change Our DNA

    Scientists have long known that diets or exposure to chemicals can change the way genes send and receive chemical signals in the body. But nothing was known about the influence of exercise. Now, Swedish scientists say they have proven that physical exercise changes our DNA.

    Video 3-D Printed Model Heart Guides Surgeons, Saves Lives

    Researchers are using 3-D printing to create models of the human heart to help heart specialists. The heart doctors can use the models to better help patients before an operation.Pictures from medical tests are sent to a 3-D printer to create a heart in a plaster or clay form.

    Audio Is a Fusion Nuclear Reactor Coming Soon?

    The United States technological organization Lockheed Martin says it will produce a working fusion nuclear reactor within five years. Lockheed Martin says it may have an operating prototype by 2017, and a version for sale by 2022. Fusion involves forcing together atomic nuclei.

    Audio Tiny Needles Treat Eye Disease

    Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness around the world. In the United States, more than two million people suffer from the disease. Now, researchers are developing very small needles that may offer a more effective and painless treatment for glaucoma and other eye diseases.

    Audio High-Tech Material Cools Buildings, Sends Heat Into Space

    Researchers at Stanford University have developed a new material that can move heat out of buildings and into space. The researchers say the material can cool buildings even on hot days. The cooling material is a very thin sheet with many layers that could be placed on a roof like solar panels.

    Video Hoverboards Ignore Gravity

    Can you imagine riding around the streets of your hometown on a skateboard without wheels? In the late 1980s, film director Robert Zemeckis showed a skateboard floating above the ground in his movie Back To The Future Part II. Now, an American company, has moved the idea from a dream to reality.

    Audio Kenyan Researchers Developing Malaria Vaccine

    The disease kills more than 500,000 people every year worldwide. Many of the victims are children. The scientists hope the vaccine will be available by next year. Using the vaccine with existing interventions may save the lives of millions of people in sub-Saharan Africa and worldwide.

Learn with The News

  • Video A Year Later, Still No Word on Malaysia Airlines Flight 370

    Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 disappeared one year ago on a flight from Malaysia to China. The flight was carrying 239 people. Malaysian officials have declared the plane’s disappearance an accident. But families with loved ones on the plane still want to know exactly what happened. More

  • Video Trail Rides Kick off Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo

    Trail rides are a big part of tradition for horse and bull riders from all over the huge state of Texas. It is a tradition that dates back to 1952. The Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo is where all of them show up to participate in the largest event of its kind in the world. More

  • Audio India Bans British Rape Documentary

    Officials in India have blocked the showing of a British documentary about a rape that shocked the world two years ago. The film includes comments from one of the six men who carried out the attack. His words angered many Indians. Some people say banning the film is not a solution to the problem More

  • U.S. ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert, right, covers a slash on his face as he leaves the Sejong Cultural Institute in Seoul, after he was attacked by an armed assailant, in Seoul, March 5, 2015.

    Audio US Ambassador to South Korea Injured in Attack

    Ambassador Mark Lippert is said to be in stable condition after a man in Seoul stabbed him. Ambassador Lippert was left with 80 stitches in his face. In other news, Liberia has released its last confirmed Ebola patient. The World Health Organization said Liberia reported no new cases last week. More

  • Video US Cities Protect Civil Rights Heritage to Increase Tourism

    President Barack Obama will visit Selma, Alabama, to mark the 50th anniversary of a day known as “Bloody Sunday.” On March 7, 1965, police officers brutally attacked peaceful demonstrators in Selma. The protesters were part of a campaign to get voting rights for African-Americans. More

Featured Stories

  • Video Dealers Show Marijuana Products at DC Show

    Industry representatives demonstrated smoking equipment and marijuana plant growing systems. Some even gave business advice about what supporters hope will be a successful industry. But the drug itself was not on display at the show. It is still a violation of federal law to possess marijuana. More

  • FILE - An embryologist works on a petri dish at a London fertility clinic.

    Audio 'Three-Person Babies' Debate Goes Beyond Science and Religion

    Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy uses the genetic material from three people to create babies. The stated purpose of the therapy is to help mothers avoid passing genetic mutations to their babies. Some say MRT will lead to 'designer babies.' Others say it is dangerous, immoral or just wrong. More

  • Steam and smoke is seen over the coal burning power plant in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2009. Coal power plants are among the biggest producer of CO2, that is supposed to be responsible for climate change.

    Audio Capturing CO2 Is Costly and Difficult

    Most scientists agree that increasing amounts of carbon-dioxide gas in the atmosphere is partly to blame for climate change. Climate change can have a big effect on weather conditions around the world. Scientists are looking for the best and least costly methods for capturing the gas. More

  • Kerry and Declan Reichs (Courtesy Photo)

    Video Choosing to Be a Single Mother

    U.S. officials say birth rates for unmarried women over age 40 have been rising in recent years. In fact, the rate in 2012 was almost 30 percent higher than just five years earlier. There are single mothers by choice. They are generally older, successful, well-educated, and financially secure. More

  • Audio Young Writer’s Plays Explore Race, Identity in America

    Branden Jacobs-Jenkins' latest play 'An Octoroon,' is showing at a theater in New York City. It is based on a 19th Century work by Dion Boucicault. It tells about a white man who falls in love with a woman who is part black. At the time, mixed race marriage was banned in southern US states. More

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