February 01, 2015 15:05 UTC

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM January 27, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM January 20, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM January 13, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


8:11 PM - 8:14 PM January 12, 2015

New Artificial Skin Feels Like Real Skin


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM January 06, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM December 30, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM December 23, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM December 16, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


3:47 PM - 3:51 PM December 10, 2014

Astronauts to Drink Out-of-this-World Coffee


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM December 09, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


10:12 PM - 10:16 PM December 09, 2014

Astronauts to Get Out-of-this-World Coffee


10:37 PM - 10:41 PM December 05, 2014

Tiny Needles Treat Eye Disease


5:32 PM - 5:36 PM December 03, 2014

Is a Working Fusion Nuclear Reactor Coming Soon?


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM December 02, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM November 25, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM November 18, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM November 11, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


10:51 PM - 10:55 PM November 07, 2014

Young Technology Expert Works to Stop Car Thefts


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM November 04, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM October 28, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.

    Video French Farmers Are Using Drones to Examine Their Crops

    It used to be mostly the military that used small, unpiloted aircraft, called “drones.” The little planes were very costly. But as they have dropped in price more people have begun to use them. Rescue workers and farmers are among the new users. The drones save money and time.

    Video Is There a Better Way to Track Passenger Planes?

    New technology could help to more closely follow passenger airplanes, and find them when they crash; international group to meet next month to discuss changes. Airline industry leaders and regulators want to improve airplane safety. They want better, more dependable tracking devices.

    Video TechShop Puts High-Tech Dreams Within Reach

    Members of TechShop use high-tech equipment to develop and produce ideas they have for inventions. Members are able to use costly machines including 3D modeling tools and laser cutters. Membership costs for TechShop start at just over $100 per month. | Science in the News

    Audio New Camera Takes Billions of Pictures Every Second

    The speed of light is almost 300 million meters per second. At that speed, it would take just one second to travel around the entire world seven-and-a-half times. A biomedical engineer and his team of researchers can now photograph light particles moving at that speed using a unique camera.

    Video New Artificial Skin Feels Like Real Skin

    Some recently developed mechanical hands can be controlled by thoughts. But people who wear them must use their sight to know what they are touching. So scientists in the United States and South Korea have developed an artificial skin that lets people know more about objects they touch.

    Video Robots as Fast as Cheetahs?

    Scientists have been experimenting with four-legged robots for years. But providing enough power for those kinds of robots has been a problem. Now, that has changed. Engineers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have designed a running robot that operates on batteries.

    Video Robot Finds Unexploded Underwater Mines

    Many teachers believe that “hands-on” experience is the best way to learn. A group of students in the U.S. is putting that belief to the test. The students are with the Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey. They successfully designed and built a robot to find underwater mines.

    Audio Study: Regular Exercise Can Change Our DNA

    Scientists have long known that diets or exposure to chemicals can change the way genes send and receive chemical signals in the body. But nothing was known about the influence of exercise. Now, Swedish scientists say they have proven that physical exercise changes our DNA.

    Video 3-D Printed Model Heart Guides Surgeons, Saves Lives

    Researchers are using 3-D printing to create models of the human heart to help heart specialists. The heart doctors can use the models to better help patients before an operation.Pictures from medical tests are sent to a 3-D printer to create a heart in a plaster or clay form.

    Audio Is a Fusion Nuclear Reactor Coming Soon?

    The United States technological organization Lockheed Martin says it will produce a working fusion nuclear reactor within five years. Lockheed Martin says it may have an operating prototype by 2017, and a version for sale by 2022. Fusion involves forcing together atomic nuclei.

    Audio Tiny Needles Treat Eye Disease

    Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness around the world. In the United States, more than two million people suffer from the disease. Now, researchers are developing very small needles that may offer a more effective and painless treatment for glaucoma and other eye diseases.

    Audio High-Tech Material Cools Buildings, Sends Heat Into Space

    Researchers at Stanford University have developed a new material that can move heat out of buildings and into space. The researchers say the material can cool buildings even on hot days. The cooling material is a very thin sheet with many layers that could be placed on a roof like solar panels.

    Video Hoverboards Ignore Gravity

    Can you imagine riding around the streets of your hometown on a skateboard without wheels? In the late 1980s, film director Robert Zemeckis showed a skateboard floating above the ground in his movie Back To The Future Part II. Now, an American company, has moved the idea from a dream to reality.

    Audio Kenyan Researchers Developing Malaria Vaccine

    The disease kills more than 500,000 people every year worldwide. Many of the victims are children. The scientists hope the vaccine will be available by next year. Using the vaccine with existing interventions may save the lives of millions of people in sub-Saharan Africa and worldwide.

    Video Dutch Experiment Grows Vegetables in Sea Water

    Due to rising sea level, farmers are increasingly unable to use fields close to the sea. A farmer in the Netherlands is growing small, but healthy and tasty crops in a mixture of fresh and salt water. Farmers in Pakistan may soon be growing Dutch potatoes in areas affected by rising sea waters.

    Video South Korea Attempting to Reuse More E-Waste

    South Korea is dealing with increasing amounts of waste from electronic devices. These useless or unwanted parts are often called “e-waste.” . The city of Seoul throws out about 10 tons of e-waste each year. Some local governments in South Korea are creating special "e-waste" recycling programs.

    Video Young Technology Expert Works to Stop Car Thefts

    About ten cars are stolen every day in Nairobi; 24-year-old technology company owner creates a device that lets owners know where their cars are, and search for their car on a computer or smartphone if it is stolen. They can even send a text message to stop their cars if stolen.

    Video Snake Robot Acts Like Real Snake

    Five years ago, the Mars Rover Spirit got stuck in sand on the red planet. Recently, the other vehicle – Curiosity -- had to go a long way to avoid another sandy area. These incidents led some scientists to develop ways to keep the costly robots from being trapped in the sand.

    Photogallery Small Organisms in Deep Sea Rocks Eat Methane

    The gas methane has been linked to rising temperatures on Earth. But methane does not stay in the atmosphere as long as another “greenhouse gas” -- carbon dioxide. Scientists say both gases trap heat from the sun. They prevent heat from escaping into outer space.

    Video Scientists Design Chips to Act Like Human Organs

    Testing new drugs for safety and effectiveness is a costly process in the United States. It also can take a lot of time. Some scientists are now designing silicon computer chips that act like human organs. The scientists think they have found a way to make the process faster and more economical.

Learn with The News

  • NASA's Dawn spacecraft heading toward the dwarf planet Ceres.   (Image - NASA/JPL-Caltech)

    Video NASA Spacecraft, Dawn, Close to Reaching a 'Dwarf Planet'

    Dawn is set to reach the dwarf planet Ceres in March. Scientists will use the spacecraft to gather clues about whether the distant, ice-covered object may have once had conditions to support life as we know it. Dawn, which left Earth seven years ago, will also explore another small planet, Vesta. More

  • Students learning computer skills on a mobile bus in Nairobi, Kenya

    Video Mobile Computer Lab Helps Thousands in Nairobi Slum

    A non-profit group is working to give Kenya’s poorest citizens access to information and technology. The Craft Silicon Foundation provides people who live in Kawangware a computer lab and computer training classes on a mobile bus. The bus has 12 computers powered by the sun through solar panels. More

  • Audio Former Secretaries of State Discuss National Security

    Henry Kissinger, George Schultz and Madeleine Albright talked about Islamic militants, immigration and the crisis in Ukraine. Protesters interrupted the event and tried to arrest Kissinger. They accused him of wrongdoing in South America, Vietnam and other countries. | As It Is More

  • Patriots Football

    Audio The Epidemic of Cheating in Sports

    Throughout time, cheating in sports has caused debate and dispute. Athletes often do whatever it takes to win in competition. Some take drugs that are meant to improve their performance, such as steroids. These might make them run faster or hit a baseball harder. More

  • freedom house vid

    Video Freedom House: Democratic Ideals Threatened Around the World

    The rights group Freedom House has reported a general decline in political and civil rights around the world last year. The group said its measure of international freedom has dropped in each of the past nine years. It added that democratic ideals are now under the greatest threat in 25 years More

Featured Stories

  • Hillary Rodham Clinton, left, joins U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., and Gov. Maggie Hassan, D-N.H., during a get out the vote rally.

    Audio Why Do So Few US Women Hold Top Jobs?

    A new study by the Pew Research Center found that the public says women are just as qualified as men to hold top positions in business and politics. But women are still not equally represented in those top jobs. Most Americans think they will see a woman president in their lifetimes. More

  • AFC Championship Football

    Superbowl Sunday: The Patriots, the Seahawks and Katy Perry, Too

    The National Football League championship game is hugely popular with sports fans and television advertisers. Tens of millions of people watch the game for the competitive play and for the funny commercials broadcast throughout. Many also enjoy the halftime show. This year Katy Perry will entertain. More

  • NYC subway art

    Video New York's 'Underground Museum' Pleases Passersby

    For the past thirty years, artists have been asked to create works of art for New York’s huge subway and train system. The works often relate to city life or to the neighborhood of a station. Some people call it New York’s “underground art museum," with over 250 pieces of original artwork. More

  • agridrone

    Video French Farmers Are Using Drones to Examine Their Crops

    It used to be mostly the military that used small, unpiloted aircraft, called “drones.” The little planes were very costly. But as they have dropped in price more people have begun to use them. Rescue workers and farmers are among the new users. The drones save money and time. More

  • Video Is There a Better Way to Track Passenger Planes?

    New technology could help to more closely follow passenger airplanes, and find them when they crash; international group to meet next month to discuss changes. Airline industry leaders and regulators want to improve airplane safety. They want better, more dependable tracking devices. More

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