May 30, 2015 23:05 UTC

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM May 26, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM May 19, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM May 12, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


6:28 PM - 6:38 PM May 08, 2015

Antibiotic Resistance Found in Amazon Tribe


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM May 05, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


11:36 PM - 11:40 PM April 30, 2015

3-D Printed Device Helps Children with Rare Breathing Disorder


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM April 28, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM April 21, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM April 14, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM April 07, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 31, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 24, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 17, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


6:28 PM - 6:31 PM March 16, 2015

Graphene: The Material of the 21st Century


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 10, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 03, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


8:57 PM - 9:10 PM March 01, 2015

'Three-Person Babies' Debate Goes Beyond Science and Religion


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM February 24, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM February 17, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM February 10, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.

    Video New Tool Maps Buildings' Energy Efficiency

    Architects, engineers and building supervisors will soon be able to quickly collect information that once took weeks to measure and process. Scientists have developed a device to gather information about building interiors – the design and exact measurements of a building.

    Audio Antibiotic Resistance Found in Amazon Tribe

    Scientists were shocked to find antibiotic-resistant bacteria on people with no known contact with Western civilization. Find out why this is worrying to scientists and the danger this may bring to fighting disease worldwide. This is an advanced level story with complex medical terms.

    Video Surgical Glue Approved for Use Inside the Body

    The new medical glue can hold tissue together. TissueGlu is the first glue to be approved for use in medical operations. The developers say it is biodegradable meaning it breaks down inside the body.

    Audio Tuberculosis Found in 18th Century Bodies

    TB mostly affects poor people and those infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. But the opposite was true 2 ½ centuries ago, when the disease infected wealthy Europeans. Researchers say new findings could change how TB is treated today.

    Video Finding Hidden Cracks with Sound Waves

    Finding hidden cracks and other weak areas in large structures can be the difference between life and death. Researchers in Britain say they have discovered a new way to identify cracks inside metal parts before they fail. Their method involves using sound imaging.

    Video Robot Helps Heal Human Muscle Damage

    A Polish company has developed a robot that helps therapists. The robot tells therapists about their patients progress and can choose the best exercises to help rehabilitate people with injuries that affect movement. Egzotech expects to have other robots ready for sale later this year.

    Video Robot Scientist Helps Design New Drugs

    Robots are common in today’s world. They manufacture cars, work in space, explore oceans, clean up oil spills and investigate dangerous environments. And now, scientists at the University of Manchester are using a robot as a laboratory partner.

    Video Satellite Will Watch Sun Storms, Send Warnings to Earth

    Strong storms on the sun can cause problems for satellites, radio communications and even airplane travel. A satellite is now traveling 1.5 million kilometers to enter the sun’s orbit, just in time to observe the extreme weather on the sun at its most violent time the sun’s 11-year cycle.

    Video Graphene: The Material of the 21st Century

    Graphene is a type of graphite mineral. Experts often call it 'The Material of the 21st Century' because of its special properties. Some U.S. companies are already using graphene for new technology products. Graphene is often described as a one-atom-thick layer of carbon.

    Video Worms Get Ready to Fly in Space

    Humans are well-equipped for life on Earth. But in space, it is a different story. Low or zero gravity changes how the blood flows and causes motion sickness. But scientists at the University of Delaware are experimenting with little worms to better understand how space travel affects astronauts.

    Video Many Life Forms Discovered Deep under Antarctic Ice

    Scientists say they have found fish and other aquatic creatures living under icy waters in Antarctica. They made the announcement after completing three months of research at the Ross Ice Shelf, the world’s largest floating ice sheet. This is the farthest south that fish have ever been seen.

    Audio 'Three-Person Babies' Debate Goes Beyond Science and Religion

    Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy uses the genetic material from three people to create babies. The stated purpose of the therapy is to help mothers avoid passing genetic mutations to their babies. Some say MRT will lead to 'designer babies.' Others say it is dangerous, immoral or just wrong.

    Audio Capturing CO2 Is Costly and Difficult

    Most scientists agree that increasing amounts of carbon-dioxide gas in the atmosphere is partly to blame for climate change. Climate change can have a big effect on weather conditions around the world. Scientists are looking for the best and least costly methods for capturing the gas.

    Video 'White Spaces' Gives Ghanaians Less Costly Internet

    Broadband Internet service can be costly. Some countries do not have the high-speed Internet because of the costs involved. But Microsoft Corporation and other companies have found a way to bring low-cost, high-speed Internet service to Ghana using high and ultra-high frequency bands.

    Video A New Camera Records Invisible Motion

    The world is in never-ending motion, even when objects seem to be perfectly still. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology use a special camera that shows these seemingly invisible movements. Many objects around us vibrate when hit by sound waves.

    Video New technology Stops Illegal Fishing on the Seas

    Experts estimate that one out of every five fish sold was caught illegally. They say the illegal fishing market is worth $23.5 billion a year. It threatens food security and hurts the environment. Officials are using new observational technology to fight illegal fishing.

    Video Can Smartphones Send Tastes, Smells, Touch Someday?

    Scientists have already produced sour, salty, sweet and bitter tastes that could be sent wirelessly. Professor Adrian David Cheok says he hopes devices like these will someday be added to houses. He says they may change the future of long-distance communication.

    Video French Farmers Are Using Drones to Examine Their Crops

    It used to be mostly the military that used small, unpiloted aircraft, called “drones.” The little planes were very costly. But as they have dropped in price more people have begun to use them. Rescue workers and farmers are among the new users. The drones save money and time.

    Video Is There a Better Way to Track Passenger Planes?

    New technology could help to more closely follow passenger airplanes, and find them when they crash; international group to meet next month to discuss changes. Airline industry leaders and regulators want to improve airplane safety. They want better, more dependable tracking devices.

    Video TechShop Puts High-Tech Dreams Within Reach

    Members of TechShop use high-tech equipment to develop and produce ideas they have for inventions. Members are able to use costly machines including 3D modeling tools and laser cutters. Membership costs for TechShop start at just over $100 per month. | Science in the News

Learn with The News

  • Video Lawmakers Debate How to Deal with Free Trade’s Results

    A measure called Trade Adjustment Assistance is meant to help workers displaced by global competition. Opponents say it is wasteful. Congress will have to deal with this and other issues as it debates trade deals with the Asia-Pacific area and Europe. More

  • Audio Asia’s Boat People: Smuggled or Trafficked?

    Thousands of Rohingya and Bangladeshis were put on boats, but left at sea. News reports, government officials and observers have used words like “trafficking” and “smuggled” when describing the boat people. But the two words have very different meanings. | In the News More

  • Audio FIFA Re-Elects Blatter Despite Corruption Scandal

    Sepp Blatter won a fifth term as FIFA president, while people around the world called for him to resign. The soccer organization has been rocked this week by arrests and corruption charges. Several groups have called for Blatter to step down and businesses are reviewing sponsorships. More

  • Audio State Limits on Media Raise Concern in Turkey

    With general elections coming in June, political parties are becoming active in the Turkish media. A government official wants to close the TV stations favorable to Islamic cleric Fethullah Gulen. The leader of the opposition Republican People’s Party, Kemal Kilicdaroglu, criticizes these limits. More

  • Video Blind Boy Defines His Life With Music

    When Frankie Moran first saw his son Cole, he could not imagine ever sharing his love of music with the boy. Cole had cognitive delays and other birth defects. And he was blind. Cole Moran is now 12 years old. Cole plays music every day. He records his performances and listens back to the sound. More

Featured Stories

  • Vladimir Lenin sculpture

    Audio Words That are Their Own Opposites

    Like Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, learn words seem to fight themselves -- they are their own opposites! Well, depending on the context. Context is important when learning a language; but with these words, context is everything. Learn more about these Janus words and why they are called Janus words. More

  • Video Blind Boy Defines His Life With Music

    When Frankie Moran first saw his son Cole, he could not imagine ever sharing his love of music with the boy. Cole had cognitive delays and other birth defects. And he was blind. Cole Moran is now 12 years old. Cole plays music every day. He records his performances and listens back to the sound. More

  • Audio Brain Remembers Language Better If You Sing It

    If you have a long list of vocabulary words to learn, you might want to write them into a familiar song. Researchers at the University of Edinburgh studied the relationship between music and remembering a foreign language. After the tests were over, the singers came out on top. And it's more fun! More

  • Video New Tool Maps Buildings' Energy Efficiency

    Architects, engineers and building supervisors will soon be able to quickly collect information that once took weeks to measure and process. Scientists have developed a device to gather information about building interiors – the design and exact measurements of a building. More

  • Audio Guide to 2016 Campaign: Money and Super PAC

    Raising money is an important part of any election in America. Candidates for the 2016 race for the White House and Congress are busy lining up dollars to fund their elections. VOA Learning English helps explain how the campaign finance systems work in the U.S. More

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