July 07, 2015 02:37 UTC

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


2:30 PM - 2:34 PM June 26, 2015

Robots Ready to Work in Restaurants


2:07 PM - 2:12 PM June 03, 2015

Plankton More Important than Scientists Thought


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM May 26, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM May 19, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM May 12, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


6:28 PM - 6:38 PM May 08, 2015

Antibiotic Resistance Found in Amazon Tribe


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM May 05, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


11:36 PM - 11:40 PM April 30, 2015

3-D Printed Device Helps Children with Rare Breathing Disorder


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM April 28, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM April 21, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM April 14, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM April 07, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 31, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 24, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 17, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


6:28 PM - 6:31 PM March 16, 2015

Graphene: The Material of the 21st Century


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 10, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 03, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


8:57 PM - 9:10 PM March 01, 2015

'Three-Person Babies' Debate Goes Beyond Science and Religion


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM February 24, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.

    Video New Device May Help Jet Pilots

    While flying high above Earth’s surface, jet fighter pilots may suffer loss of eyesight for brief periods. Some pilots may even lose consciousness. These experiences, commonly called blackouts, can lead to tragic results. An Israeli company may have developed a device that could save pilots’ lives.

    Video Robots Ready to Work in Restaurants

    For many years, machines have been doing work that people once did, including some difficult jobs. Search and rescue operations employ high technology robots. But there is another area that may soon take jobs traditionally held by human beings: the restaurant industry.

    Video Scientists Developing Technology to Recreate Crime Scenes

    Police and prosecutors sometime recreate crime scenes in an effort to better understand complex cases. Now, scientists in Switzerland are developing virtual reality technologies to recreate crimes scenes. The scientists say these computer-made images can be used for quality recreations of events.

    Video Scientists: Rising Sea Levels to Continue

    An exhibit at the Aquarium of the Pacific warns the level of the sea around the world could rise by one meter by 2100. Now, scientists are calling for coastal communities to find new way to adapt including new building designs and floating structures.

    Video Robot Security Could Help Cut Crime

    Shopping centers, stadiums and universities may soon have a new tool to help fight crime. A California company called Knightscope says its robots can predict and prevent crime. Knightscope says the goal is to reduce crime by half in the areas where the robots patrol.

    Audio Damaged Robots Learn to Make Changes to Keep Working

    When a dog loses a leg, the animal eventually figures out the best way to get around on three legs. In a short time, the dog learns deal with its physical disability. Now, scientists have developed robots that behave in much the same way. They learn to find a way to deal with the damage.

    Video Plankton More Important than Scientists Thought

    Plankton are a group of different ocean creatures, algae, bacteria and other organisms. A four-year-long study shows that the small organisms are not just food for whales and other sea creatures. It found that plankton are a major provider of oxygen for our planet.

    Audio Scientists Testing Space Propulsion by Light

    Can the sun provide power for a spaceship to travel to the edge of our solar system? The answer may come from a small satellite. The satellite is designed to test the effectiveness of what is called solar sail propulsion.

    Video New Tool Maps Buildings' Energy Efficiency

    Architects, engineers and building supervisors will soon be able to quickly collect information that once took weeks to measure and process. Scientists have developed a device to gather information about building interiors – the design and exact measurements of a building.

    Audio Antibiotic Resistance Found in Amazon Tribe

    Scientists were shocked to find antibiotic-resistant bacteria on people with no known contact with Western civilization. Find out why this is worrying to scientists and the danger this may bring to fighting disease worldwide. This is an advanced level story with complex medical terms.

    Video Surgical Glue Approved for Use Inside the Body

    The new medical glue can hold tissue together. TissueGlu is the first glue to be approved for use in medical operations. The developers say it is biodegradable meaning it breaks down inside the body.

    Audio Tuberculosis Found in 18th Century Bodies

    TB mostly affects poor people and those infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. But the opposite was true 2 ½ centuries ago, when the disease infected wealthy Europeans. Researchers say new findings could change how TB is treated today.

    Video Finding Hidden Cracks with Sound Waves

    Finding hidden cracks and other weak areas in large structures can be the difference between life and death. Researchers in Britain say they have discovered a new way to identify cracks inside metal parts before they fail. Their method involves using sound imaging.

    Video Robot Helps Heal Human Muscle Damage

    A Polish company has developed a robot that helps therapists. The robot tells therapists about their patients progress and can choose the best exercises to help rehabilitate people with injuries that affect movement. Egzotech expects to have other robots ready for sale later this year.

    Video Robot Scientist Helps Design New Drugs

    Robots are common in today’s world. They manufacture cars, work in space, explore oceans, clean up oil spills and investigate dangerous environments. And now, scientists at the University of Manchester are using a robot as a laboratory partner.

    Video Satellite Will Watch Sun Storms, Send Warnings to Earth

    Strong storms on the sun can cause problems for satellites, radio communications and even airplane travel. A satellite is now traveling 1.5 million kilometers to enter the sun’s orbit, just in time to observe the extreme weather on the sun at its most violent time the sun’s 11-year cycle.

    Video Graphene: The Material of the 21st Century

    Graphene is a type of graphite mineral. Experts often call it 'The Material of the 21st Century' because of its special properties. Some U.S. companies are already using graphene for new technology products. Graphene is often described as a one-atom-thick layer of carbon.

    Video Worms Get Ready to Fly in Space

    Humans are well-equipped for life on Earth. But in space, it is a different story. Low or zero gravity changes how the blood flows and causes motion sickness. But scientists at the University of Delaware are experimenting with little worms to better understand how space travel affects astronauts.

    Video Many Life Forms Discovered Deep under Antarctic Ice

    Scientists say they have found fish and other aquatic creatures living under icy waters in Antarctica. They made the announcement after completing three months of research at the Ross Ice Shelf, the world’s largest floating ice sheet. This is the farthest south that fish have ever been seen.

    Audio 'Three-Person Babies' Debate Goes Beyond Science and Religion

    Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy uses the genetic material from three people to create babies. The stated purpose of the therapy is to help mothers avoid passing genetic mutations to their babies. Some say MRT will lead to 'designer babies.' Others say it is dangerous, immoral or just wrong.

Learn with The News

  • Audio Greek Vote, China Weigh on East Asia Stock Prices

    Share prices mostly fell on Asian stock markets Monday. Greece’s rejection of European terms for its financial rescue loan and China’s stock market troubles are affecting stock prices across the region. Financial experts say smaller investors are fleeing the stock market and investing in real estate More

  • Audio China May Be Facing Economic Slowdown

    China’s economy is growing slowly after years of strong gains. Some China watchers in the United States say the Chinese economy is slowing to a halt. They use the word stagnating. They say stagnation is a real threat unless new reforms can bring big changes to the Chinese economic system. More

  • Audio Report: Faster Speeds, Less Space on Internet

    A new report says Internet speeds around the world are getting much faster. But it warns that the sharp increase in the number of devices connected to the World Wide Web could cause problems. Solutions to this problem do exist. However, Internet service providers have not begun to use them. More

  • Audio Extremely Dry Weather Raises HIV Risk

    A new study shows a lack of rainfall may be the main reason for financial bad news in rural areas of sub-Saharan Africa. The study finds protecting people from financial hardship may reduce their likelihood of risky behaviors that spread HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus. More

  • Solar Plane

    Video Solar-Powered Plane Lands in Hawaii after Crossing the Pacific

    A plane that uses only solar power landed on the island of Oahu, Hawaii on Friday after being flown across the Pacific Ocean. The flight was the most dangerous part of the plane’s planned 35,000-kilometer trip around the world. The trip is being made without using any fuel. More

Featured Stories

  • Three F-35 Joint Strike Fighters (rear to front) AF-2, AF-3 and AF-4. A new system to prevent pilots from suffering loss of consciousness is being developed for the aircraft.

    Video New Device May Help Jet Pilots

    While flying high above Earth’s surface, jet fighter pilots may suffer loss of eyesight for brief periods. Some pilots may even lose consciousness. These experiences, commonly called blackouts, can lead to tragic results. An Israeli company may have developed a device that could save pilots’ lives. More

  • Audio The Changing Face of America

    The faces of Americans in the United States are changing rapidly. In a few decades, the minority population will become the majority, as the white population decreases in the U.S. Those are the findings of a new report by the Census Bureau. More

  • People-Lewis Black

    Video Summer 2015 Brings Movies for Toddlers to Teens

    A girl's emotions star in 'Inside Out,' an animation from Pixar. 'Minions' is the story of the little yellow creatures from the 'Despicable Me' series. Don't like cartoon movies? Try "Paper Towns' based on a John Green book or 'Ricki and the Flash' starring Meryl Streep and daughter Maggie Gummer. More

  • Everyday Grammar: Beating Problems with Adverbs

    Audio Everyday Grammar: Beating Problems with Adverbs

    Some common mistakes in English happen when speakers confuse adjectives and adverbs. And some adverbs look the same but have opposite meanings. Do not fear, the Everyday Grammar expert is here to sort it all out for you. Learn why -ly usually (but not always) tells you a word is an adverb. More

  • Audio Things You (Probably) Don’t Know About the 4th of July

    Sure, you know Americans celebrate their Independence Day on the fourth day of July. But do you know they have the wrong date? Or where they get all those fireworks? Hint: not from the UK. More

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