March 29, 2015 19:32 UTC

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 24, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 17, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


6:28 PM - 6:31 PM March 16, 2015

Graphene: The Material of the 21st Century


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 10, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 03, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


8:57 PM - 9:10 PM March 01, 2015

'Three-Person Babies' Debate Goes Beyond Science and Religion


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM February 24, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM February 17, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM February 10, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


4:17 PM - 4:20 PM February 09, 2015

Can Smartphones Send Tastes, Smells, Touch Someday?


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM February 03, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM January 27, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM January 20, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM January 13, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


8:11 PM - 8:14 PM January 12, 2015

New Artificial Skin Feels Like Real Skin


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM January 06, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM December 30, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM December 23, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM December 16, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


3:47 PM - 3:51 PM December 10, 2014

Astronauts to Drink Out-of-this-World Coffee

    Video Satellite Will Watch Sun Storms, Send Warnings to Earth

    Strong storms on the sun can cause problems for satellites, radio communications and even airplane travel. A satellite is now traveling 1.5 million kilometers to enter the sun’s orbit, just in time to observe the extreme weather on the sun at its most violent time the sun’s 11-year cycle.

    Video Graphene: The Material of the 21st Century

    Graphene is a type of graphite mineral. Experts often call it 'The Material of the 21st Century' because of its special properties. Some U.S. companies are already using graphene for new technology products. Graphene is often described as a one-atom-thick layer of carbon.

    Video Worms Get Ready to Fly in Space

    Humans are well-equipped for life on Earth. But in space, it is a different story. Low or zero gravity changes how the blood flows and causes motion sickness. But scientists at the University of Delaware are experimenting with little worms to better understand how space travel affects astronauts.

    Video Many Life Forms Discovered Deep under Antarctic Ice

    Scientists say they have found fish and other aquatic creatures living under icy waters in Antarctica. They made the announcement after completing three months of research at the Ross Ice Shelf, the world’s largest floating ice sheet. This is the farthest south that fish have ever been seen.

    Audio 'Three-Person Babies' Debate Goes Beyond Science and Religion

    Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy uses the genetic material from three people to create babies. The stated purpose of the therapy is to help mothers avoid passing genetic mutations to their babies. Some say MRT will lead to 'designer babies.' Others say it is dangerous, immoral or just wrong.

    Audio Capturing CO2 Is Costly and Difficult

    Most scientists agree that increasing amounts of carbon-dioxide gas in the atmosphere is partly to blame for climate change. Climate change can have a big effect on weather conditions around the world. Scientists are looking for the best and least costly methods for capturing the gas.

    Video 'White Spaces' Gives Ghanaians Less Costly Internet

    Broadband Internet service can be costly. Some countries do not have the high-speed Internet because of the costs involved. But Microsoft Corporation and other companies have found a way to bring low-cost, high-speed Internet service to Ghana using high and ultra-high frequency bands.

    Video A New Camera Records Invisible Motion

    The world is in never-ending motion, even when objects seem to be perfectly still. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology use a special camera that shows these seemingly invisible movements. Many objects around us vibrate when hit by sound waves.

    Video New technology Stops Illegal Fishing on the Seas

    Experts estimate that one out of every five fish sold was caught illegally. They say the illegal fishing market is worth $23.5 billion a year. It threatens food security and hurts the environment. Officials are using new observational technology to fight illegal fishing.

    Video Can Smartphones Send Tastes, Smells, Touch Someday?

    Scientists have already produced sour, salty, sweet and bitter tastes that could be sent wirelessly. Professor Adrian David Cheok says he hopes devices like these will someday be added to houses. He says they may change the future of long-distance communication.

    Video French Farmers Are Using Drones to Examine Their Crops

    It used to be mostly the military that used small, unpiloted aircraft, called “drones.” The little planes were very costly. But as they have dropped in price more people have begun to use them. Rescue workers and farmers are among the new users. The drones save money and time.

    Video Is There a Better Way to Track Passenger Planes?

    New technology could help to more closely follow passenger airplanes, and find them when they crash; international group to meet next month to discuss changes. Airline industry leaders and regulators want to improve airplane safety. They want better, more dependable tracking devices.

    Video TechShop Puts High-Tech Dreams Within Reach

    Members of TechShop use high-tech equipment to develop and produce ideas they have for inventions. Members are able to use costly machines including 3D modeling tools and laser cutters. Membership costs for TechShop start at just over $100 per month. | Science in the News

    Audio New Camera Takes Billions of Pictures Every Second

    The speed of light is almost 300 million meters per second. At that speed, it would take just one second to travel around the entire world seven-and-a-half times. A biomedical engineer and his team of researchers can now photograph light particles moving at that speed using a unique camera.

    Video New Artificial Skin Feels Like Real Skin

    Some recently developed mechanical hands can be controlled by thoughts. But people who wear them must use their sight to know what they are touching. So scientists in the United States and South Korea have developed an artificial skin that lets people know more about objects they touch.

    Video Robots as Fast as Cheetahs?

    Scientists have been experimenting with four-legged robots for years. But providing enough power for those kinds of robots has been a problem. Now, that has changed. Engineers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have designed a running robot that operates on batteries.

    Video Robot Finds Unexploded Underwater Mines

    Many teachers believe that “hands-on” experience is the best way to learn. A group of students in the U.S. is putting that belief to the test. The students are with the Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey. They successfully designed and built a robot to find underwater mines.

    Audio Study: Regular Exercise Can Change Our DNA

    Scientists have long known that diets or exposure to chemicals can change the way genes send and receive chemical signals in the body. But nothing was known about the influence of exercise. Now, Swedish scientists say they have proven that physical exercise changes our DNA.

    Video 3-D Printed Model Heart Guides Surgeons, Saves Lives

    Researchers are using 3-D printing to create models of the human heart to help heart specialists. The heart doctors can use the models to better help patients before an operation.Pictures from medical tests are sent to a 3-D printer to create a heart in a plaster or clay form.

    Audio Is a Fusion Nuclear Reactor Coming Soon?

    The United States technological organization Lockheed Martin says it will produce a working fusion nuclear reactor within five years. Lockheed Martin says it may have an operating prototype by 2017, and a version for sale by 2022. Fusion involves forcing together atomic nuclei.

Learn with The News

  • Video Could Drones Help Save Rhinos in South Africa?

    Searching for illegal hunting is best done from above. But piloted flights are costly. Now, some college students have made a drone to look for poachers. It is low cost and can observe more places than other aircraft. South African officials may find drones a good tool in animal protection efforts. More

  • Audio Don't Panic!

    Actually ... seeing a Great White shark this close would be a great time to panic. Read on to learn about the Greek myth behind the work "panic" and some idioms. There is also a shortened section from "The Sea Wolf" by writer Jack London. He wrote one of the greatest panic attacks in literature. More

  • Princess Awesome clothes for little girls.

    Video New Girls' Clothing Line Breaks Stereotypes

    Many girls enjoy flowers, riding ponies and other girly things. However some girls also like cars, robots and spaceships Two mothers decided to make clothes that are more representative of all the things that little girls are, and do, and love. More

  • A Houthi Shiite fighter stands guard as people search for survivors under the rubble of houses destroyed by Saudi airstrikes near Sanaa Airport, Yemen, Thursday, March 26, 2015

    Audio Saudi-led Airstrikes in Yemen Aim to Stop Rebels

    Yemen Foreign Minister Riyadh Yasin said the Houthi rebels should weaken after two days of air strikes from a coalition of Arab countries, led by Saudi Arabia. The coalition of 10 countries, including five Gulf kingdoms, is trying to bring Yemen’s internationally recognized government back to power. More

  • Audio Cambodia Supports China's Position on South China Sea

    Cambodia’s prime minister said the dispute between China and other nations in the South China Sea area cannot be solved through ASEAN. Prime Minister Hun Sen said Wednesday that the issue should be solved by the countries directly affected by the disputes. More

Featured Stories

  • Audio New Treatment for AIDS Called a ‘Big Deal’

    Read on to learn words like mutate, neutralize and antiretroviral as you learn how researchers have found a way to trick HIV, the virus causing AIDS, into killing itself. The difficulty level might be high as this article describes what happens when a genetically modified cell become an HIV. More

  • Video Angelina Jolie Has Second Surgery to Prevent Cancer

    The 39-year-old actress published a piece in The New York Times about her decision to have her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed to protect herself from cancer. She had a double mastectomy two years ago for the same reason. The latest surgery leaves the mother of six unable to have more children. More

  • Space Rocket to Launch Weather Satellite Into Deep Space

    Video Satellite Will Watch Sun Storms, Send Warnings to Earth

    Strong storms on the sun can cause problems for satellites, radio communications and even airplane travel. A satellite is now traveling 1.5 million kilometers to enter the sun’s orbit, just in time to observe the extreme weather on the sun at its most violent time the sun’s 11-year cycle. More

  • An employee plays the game Flappy Bird at a smartphone store in Hanoi, Feb. 10, 2014.

    Audio Too Much Gaming is a Pain in the Neck

    Smartphones and other electronic devices, or gadgets, are becoming more affordable. Children in India are using them more and more. Doctors say children who spend long hours playing video games are increasingly showing signs of physical deformities, meaning their bodies are not growing properly. More

  • Video Secrets of a Saddle-Maker

    People began riding horses thousands of years ago. Saddles for horseback riding were invented soon after. Today, many companies manufacture saddles. But it is rare to find someone who designs and makes these products by hand. American Keith Valley is one of the few. More

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