August 04, 2015 23:55 UTC

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


3:00 PM - 3:03 PM July 29, 2015

Simulation Technology Helps Control and Manage Traffic


10:48 PM - 10:52 PM July 22, 2015

Why Do Mosquitoes Choose to Bite You?


2:30 PM - 2:34 PM June 26, 2015

Robots Ready to Work in Restaurants


2:07 PM - 2:12 PM June 03, 2015

Plankton More Important than Scientists Thought


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM May 26, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM May 19, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM May 12, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


6:28 PM - 6:38 PM May 08, 2015

Antibiotic Resistance Found in Amazon Tribe


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM May 05, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


11:36 PM - 11:40 PM April 30, 2015

3-D Printed Device Helps Children with Rare Breathing Disorder


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM April 28, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM April 21, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM April 14, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM April 07, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 31, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 24, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 17, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


6:28 PM - 6:31 PM March 16, 2015

Graphene: The Material of the 21st Century


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 10, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM March 03, 2015

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of environment and science.

    Video Simulation Helps Control, Manage Traffic

    Controlling traffic is a complex and high cost problem in many developed countries. It becomes more difficult and costly with the ever-increasing number of cars on the roads. But scientists and students at CATT at the University of Maryland are working to solve that problem.

    Video Solar Activity Can Affect Communication, Power on Earth

    Scientists who study the sun watch for sunspots -- violent storms that can affect communications, navigation systems and even electric power stations on Earth. Sunspots are a product of huge electromagnetic storms on the sun. Scientists can observe them eight minutes after they happen.

    Video Changing Arctic Conditions Threaten Polar Bears

    Researchers, following the animals on the Arctic, discovered sea ice is melting faster than predicted, making it harder for polar bears to survive. They are calling on nations to reduce greenhouse gases. If that does not happen, polar bears could one day disappear from our planet.

    Audio Why Do Mosquitoes Choose to Bite You?

    Mosquitoes need blood to survive and their favorite target is humans. They are completely driven by smell. How do they find their victims and why do they prefer some people more than others? New research now shows how mosquitoes choose who to bite.

    Video Bladeless Wind Generator Safe for Birds

    Wind turbines are tall structures with large blades used to produce electricity. They are useful sources of low-cost, renewable energy. But they can also be deadly to birds and bats that fly near the wind turbines. But a new type of wind generator may offer an answer to that problem.

    Video Fish Use Whole Bodies When They Eat

    Fish are animals that live in the water. They are also vertebrates – animals that have a backbone and a spine. Have you ever wonder how vertebrates eat food? Now researchers at Brown University have x-ray video that shown the action and why vertebrates use its whole body to eat.

    Video Defending Spacecraft and Astronauts Against Dust

    Our Milky Way solar system began as small pieces of star-created gas and dust. Scientists are studying this dust with a student-designed instrument on the American space agency’s New Horizons spacecraft. The agency is busy collecting information from the spacecraft this week in the first-ever flyby.

    Video Personal Flying Vehicles Close to Reality

    Many people have long dreamed of being able to fly around as simply as riding a bicycle. Yet the safety and strength of a flying bike was always a big problem. Over the past 10 years, developments in technology have moved the dream of personal flying vehicles closer to reality.

    Video New Device May Help Jet Pilots

    While flying high above Earth’s surface, jet fighter pilots may suffer loss of eyesight for brief periods. Some pilots may even lose consciousness. These experiences, commonly called blackouts, can lead to tragic results. An Israeli company may have developed a device that could save pilots’ lives.

    Video Robots Ready to Work in Restaurants

    For many years, machines have been doing work that people once did, including some difficult jobs. Search and rescue operations employ high technology robots. But there is another area that may soon take jobs traditionally held by human beings: the restaurant industry.

    Video Scientists Developing Technology to Recreate Crime Scenes

    Police and prosecutors sometime recreate crime scenes in an effort to better understand complex cases. Now, scientists in Switzerland are developing virtual reality technologies to recreate crimes scenes. The scientists say these computer-made images can be used for quality recreations of events.

    Video Scientists: Rising Sea Levels to Continue

    An exhibit at the Aquarium of the Pacific warns the level of the sea around the world could rise by one meter by 2100. Now, scientists are calling for coastal communities to find new way to adapt including new building designs and floating structures.

    Video Robot Security Could Help Cut Crime

    Shopping centers, stadiums and universities may soon have a new tool to help fight crime. A California company called Knightscope says its robots can predict and prevent crime. Knightscope says the goal is to reduce crime by half in the areas where the robots patrol.

    Audio Damaged Robots Learn to Make Changes to Keep Working

    When a dog loses a leg, the animal eventually figures out the best way to get around on three legs. In a short time, the dog learns deal with its physical disability. Now, scientists have developed robots that behave in much the same way. They learn to find a way to deal with the damage.

    Video Plankton More Important than Scientists Thought

    Plankton are a group of different ocean creatures, algae, bacteria and other organisms. A four-year-long study shows that the small organisms are not just food for whales and other sea creatures. It found that plankton are a major provider of oxygen for our planet.

    Audio Scientists Testing Space Propulsion by Light

    Can the sun provide power for a spaceship to travel to the edge of our solar system? The answer may come from a small satellite. The satellite is designed to test the effectiveness of what is called solar sail propulsion.

    Video New Tool Maps Buildings' Energy Efficiency

    Architects, engineers and building supervisors will soon be able to quickly collect information that once took weeks to measure and process. Scientists have developed a device to gather information about building interiors – the design and exact measurements of a building.

    Audio Antibiotic Resistance Found in Amazon Tribe

    Scientists were shocked to find antibiotic-resistant bacteria on people with no known contact with Western civilization. Find out why this is worrying to scientists and the danger this may bring to fighting disease worldwide. This is an advanced level story with complex medical terms.

    Video Surgical Glue Approved for Use Inside the Body

    The new medical glue can hold tissue together. TissueGlu is the first glue to be approved for use in medical operations. The developers say it is biodegradable meaning it breaks down inside the body.

    Audio Tuberculosis Found in 18th Century Bodies

    TB mostly affects poor people and those infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. But the opposite was true 2 ½ centuries ago, when the disease infected wealthy Europeans. Researchers say new findings could change how TB is treated today.

Learn with The News

  • U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (L) and U.S. President Barack Obama (R) talk to reporters after their meeting in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, D.C., United States Aug. 4, 2015.

    Audio UN Chief Praises Obama's Climate Plan

    Also in the news, Ukraine grants citizenship to the daughter of a former Russian prime minister and a well-known Russian journalist; Sec. of State Kerry welcomes progress toward Pacific nations trade deal; Pro-government forces recapture Yemeni base. More

  • Audio First US Presidential Debate: What Will They Say Next?

    On August 6, the 10 candidates with the most public support will argue issues and politics in front of a live audience. The event will be broadcast on television as it happens. It will be the first of 11 debates planned through next March. Experts say most people will watch to see Donald Trump. More

  • Audio Second American Accused of Illegally Killing Lion in Zimbabwe

    Officials in Zimbabwe have accused a second American of killing a lion illegally. Last week, Zimbabwe’s government asked the United States to extradite American Walter Palmer. They say he illegally killed a rare, black-maned lion. The killing of the lions has launched a debate over trophy-hunting. More

  • Thai military and volunteers work to repair a leak in a dike on the canal in On Nut, Bangkok. The flooding was 300 meters away from Bangkok's main thoroughfare Sukhumvit, October 31, 2011. (VOA)

    Video Bangkok Could Soon Be Underwater

    The Italian city of Venice and the American city of New Orleans, Louisiana are slowly sinking. So is Bangkok, home to about 10 million people. Officials in the city and scientists say they do not know how long people will be able to continue living in the Thai capital. More

  • Audio Digital Solution Helps Shield Online Activists

    The National Democratic Institute, a non-profit group, says a “live” operating system calls “Tails” is helping pro-democracy activists and others hide their online communications and activities from hostile governments. “Tails” is an acronym for The Amnesic Incognito Live System. More

Featured Stories

  • Audio Let’s Go on a Space Trip!

    You do not need to spend $50 million on a ticket to the moon. Just close your eyes and come with us to a trip into outer space! Learn idioms that will help you navigate the world of space. More

  • Audio Everyday Grammar: May, Might, and Must

    May, Might and Must are modal verbs that cause confusion for some learners. The Everyday Grammar team is on the job, explaining how to use these modals to express how certain, or sure, you are of something. You can also use one of them to tell about your wishes for the future. More

  • Video Feathertop by Nathaniel Hawthorne

    This classic American story features a scarecrow that comes to life. Find out what adventures he has as he looks for love and admiration. His only problem is that he has to keep puffing on the pipe the witch gave him. If he stops - something terrible may happen! More

  • Audio Study Shows How Poverty Could Limit Learning

    Studies have shown that children from poor families have more difficulty in school than other boys and girls. Children with higher socioeconomic roots seem better prepared and perform better on school tests. Now, American researchers may have found a biological reason for that difference. More

  • Audio Study: Smoking May Increase Risk of Schizophrenia

    Researchers reviewed 61 studies from around the world; they discovered cigarette smoking is three times more common among those with schizophrenia who were receiving medical care for the illness for the first time compared to people who did not have the mental disorder. More

Practice Your Writing

Confessions of an English Learner
Confessions of an English Learner blog

Tell us About Our Programs