December 19, 2014 00:33 UTC

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM December 16, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


3:47 PM - 3:51 PM December 10, 2014

Astronauts to Drink Out-of-this-World Coffee


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM December 09, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


10:12 PM - 10:16 PM December 09, 2014

Astronauts to Get Out-of-this-World Coffee


10:37 PM - 10:41 PM December 05, 2014

Tiny Needles Treat Eye Disease


5:32 PM - 5:36 PM December 03, 2014

Is a Working Fusion Nuclear Reactor Coming Soon?


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM December 02, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM November 25, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM November 18, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM November 11, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


10:51 PM - 10:55 PM November 07, 2014

Young Technology Expert Works to Stop Car Thefts


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM November 04, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM October 28, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM October 21, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM October 14, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


5:06 PM - 5:11 PM October 09, 2014

Scientists Create New Maps of Ocean Floor


3:54 PM - 4:00 PM October 09, 2014


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM October 07, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.


8:30 PM - 8:34 PM October 06, 2014

Three Scientists Win Nobel Prize for Brain Research

How do you know where you are? These Nobel Prize winners can tell you.


10:45 PM - 11:00 PM September 30, 2014

Science in the News

Science in the News is our weekly show about news from the worlds of science, technology and medicine.

    Audio Tiny Needles Treat Eye Disease

    Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness around the world. In the United States, more than two million people suffer from the disease. Now, researchers are developing very small needles that may offer a more effective and painless treatment for glaucoma and other eye diseases.

    Audio High-Tech Material Cools Buildings, Sends Heat Into Space

    Researchers at Stanford University have developed a new material that can move heat out of buildings and into space. The researchers say the material can cool buildings even on hot days. The cooling material is a very thin sheet with many layers that could be placed on a roof like solar panels.

    Video Hoverboards Ignore Gravity

    Can you imagine riding around the streets of your hometown on a skateboard without wheels? In the late 1980s, film director Robert Zemeckis showed a skateboard floating above the ground in his movie Back To The Future Part II. Now, an American company, has moved the idea from a dream to reality.

    Audio Kenyan Researchers Developing Malaria Vaccine

    The disease kills more than 500,000 people every year worldwide. Many of the victims are children. The scientists hope the vaccine will be available by next year. Using the vaccine with existing interventions may save the lives of millions of people in sub-Saharan Africa and worldwide.

    Video Dutch Experiment Grows Vegetables in Sea Water

    Due to rising sea level, farmers are increasingly unable to use fields close to the sea. A farmer in the Netherlands is growing small, but healthy and tasty crops in a mixture of fresh and salt water. Farmers in Pakistan may soon be growing Dutch potatoes in areas affected by rising sea waters.

    Video South Korea Attempting to Reuse More E-Waste

    South Korea is dealing with increasing amounts of waste from electronic devices. These useless or unwanted parts are often called “e-waste.” . The city of Seoul throws out about 10 tons of e-waste each year. Some local governments in South Korea are creating special "e-waste" recycling programs.

    Video Young Technology Expert Works to Stop Car Thefts

    About ten cars are stolen every day in Nairobi; 24-year-old technology company owner creates a device that lets owners know where their cars are, and search for their car on a computer or smartphone if it is stolen. They can even send a text message to stop their cars if stolen.

    Video Snake Robot Acts Like Real Snake

    Five years ago, the Mars Rover Spirit got stuck in sand on the red planet. Recently, the other vehicle – Curiosity -- had to go a long way to avoid another sandy area. These incidents led some scientists to develop ways to keep the costly robots from being trapped in the sand.

    Photogallery Small Organisms in Deep Sea Rocks Eat Methane

    The gas methane has been linked to rising temperatures on Earth. But methane does not stay in the atmosphere as long as another “greenhouse gas” -- carbon dioxide. Scientists say both gases trap heat from the sun. They prevent heat from escaping into outer space.

    Video Scientists Design Chips to Act Like Human Organs

    Testing new drugs for safety and effectiveness is a costly process in the United States. It also can take a lot of time. Some scientists are now designing silicon computer chips that act like human organs. The scientists think they have found a way to make the process faster and more economical.

    Video Scientists Create New Maps of Ocean Floor

    Until recently, scientists had mapped only about 20 percent of the sea floor. But our knowledge of the deep seas is changing because of information from satellites. Scientists have produced a new map that provides a detailed picture of the oceans.

    Audio How to Weather a Solar Storm

    The sun’s energy creates light and heat. It also produces charged electrical particles and magnetic fields. The sun can keep the earth nice and warm and helps our crops to grow. But a sudden burst of that solar energy can cause a power outage.

    Audio Three Scientists Win Nobel Prize for Brain Research

    American-born British Scientist John O'Keefe and Norwegians May-Britt Moser and Edvard Moser won the Nobel Prize in medicine. They discovered how the brain knows the body’s location.

    Video Researchers Work on 3-D Printing of Living Tissue

    Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina started working on creating living tissue since 2003. Now, with the help of a 3-D printer they call the Palmetto printer, the scientists hope to be able to print tissue to replace damaged organs.

    Video Citizen-Scientists Take Control of Old Satellite

    Former NASA engineer helps group get information from a satellite that was launched in the 1970s and had been silent for years; giving an old satellite a new mission. | As It Is

    Audio Turning Cigarette Butts to Batteries

    Scientists in South Korea find that “one person’s trash is another person’s treasure.” Read on to learn about this idiom and many other expressions.

    Audio How Did You Get so Intelligent?

    Researchers saw immediate changes in brains of people when they were told hard work is more important than their genes | Science in the News

    Audio Earth's Ozone Layer Shows Signs of Recovery

    The new report says the Earth’s ozone layer is showing signs of recovery. Ozone is a form of oxygen. It is found in the air we breathe and in Earth's atmosphere.

    Audio Scientists Discover Secrets for Tastier Tomatoes

    The discoveries may also help make African rice more popular | In The News

    Audio Video Game Technology to Save Lives

    A hospital in the American state of Texas is using video game technology to help doctors save patients’ lives. The technology shows detailed pictures of patients’ bodies. Doctors then use the pictures to plan and perform operations.

Learn with The News

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    Video Sony Criticized for Cancelling 'The Interview'

    The company acted after a group of computer hackers attacked the company and threatened to attack movie theaters that show the film. Most people have criticized Sony’s decision to cancel the release. The US says North Korea was behind the cyber attack. North Korea denies the accusation. More

  • The MOM Incubator could save more babies in refugee camps who die due to complications of premature birth.

    Audio Low-Cost Incubator May Save More Babies

    Premature birth is the biggest killer of children worldwide. About one million babies around the world die of problems because they are born too early. Many of these babies could have been saved if they had been placed in an incubator. A young British researcher says he has found a solution. More

  • A screenshot from Cuban television shows President Raul Castro addressing the country, in Havana, Dec. 17, 2014.

    Audio US, Cuba Normalize Relations

    After the release of Alan Gross from prison, U.S. and Cuba announce policy changes that end more than 50 years of diplomatic isolation that began in the Cold War. Also in the news, India joins Pakistan in mourning after Tuesday's Taliban attack. And Sony Pictures cancels release of "The Interview." More

  • Audio How Much of You Does Facebook Own?

    If you use Facebook, your friends may have posted an update recently saying Facebook is not permitted to violate their privacy. But how much of your data -- things you post -- does Facebook legally own? Experts say Facebook's terms of service agreement clearly says they own most of what you post. More

  • India schoolgirls offer prayers for victims killed in a Taliban attack on a Pakistan military-run school, in Mumbai, India, Dec. 17, 2014.

    Audio India Joins Pakistan in Mourning Murdered Students

    India and Pakistan have long disagreed about many issues. But on Wednesday, Indian lawmakers and students lowered their heads and observed two minutes of silence in memory of 132 Pakistani children. The children died on Tuesday in an attack on their school in the city of Peshawar. More

Featured Stories

  • Video Music Shows in Private Homes Gain Popularity

    Attending a live musical performance, be it in a huge arena or a small cafe, is an exciting experience. But here in the U.S., a very different kind of performance is gaining popularity: house concerts. “There's just a totally unique experience as opposed to playing like a coffee shop or a bar." More

  • Lee Surrenders to Grant at Appomatox

    Audio Southern General Robert E. Lee Surrenders at Appomattox

    General Robert E. Lee’s military skill and intelligence helped extend the war between the states. But even his skill could not save the South from the industrial power of the North and its mighty armies -- armies that were better-fed and better-equipped. On Sunday, August 9, Lee surrendered. More

  • Uganda Playground for Disabled Children

    Audio Helping Uganda’s Disabled Children Play

    You may think that all children have freedom to play. But for children who look differently from others or have physical disabilities, the idea of play can seem far away. An organization in Uganda is seeking to change that. Read on to learn words needed to talk about this sometimes difficult topic. More

  • A microneedle used to inject glaucoma medications into the eye is shown next to a liquid drop from a conventional eye dropper. (Georgia Tech Photo: Gary Meek

    Audio Tiny Needles Treat Eye Disease

    Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness around the world. In the United States, more than two million people suffer from the disease. Now, researchers are developing very small needles that may offer a more effective and painless treatment for glaucoma and other eye diseases. More

  • The National Museum of Organized Crime and Law Enforcement in Las Vegas

    Audio Mob Museum Tells About the Mafia in America

    The U.S. government has long used public money to fight organized crime. Now, public money is also paying for a museum in Las Vegas to tell about "The Mob,” and not everyone is happy about that. But some say it helps the local economy by bringing people to a part of Las Vegas that few visit. More

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