September 02, 2014 13:55 UTC

Science & Technology

Televisions Stole the Spotlight at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas

Read, listen and learn English with this story. Double-click on any word to find the definition in the Merriam-Webster Learner's Dictionary.

Models show a ICC Purios Ultra HD television at a Sharp news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. Seen in the background are new Aquos 8-Series televisions and a 90-inch LED Smart 3D TV (far left). Sharp
Models show a ICC Purios Ultra HD television at a Sharp news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. Seen in the background are new Aquos 8-Series televisions and a 90-inch LED Smart 3D TV (far left). Sharp

Multimedia

Play or download an MP3 of this story
From VOA Learning English, this is the Technology Report in Special English.
 
Televisions were among the most talked about items at the 2013 International Consumer Electronics Show last week in Las Vegas, Nevada. They were bigger and better, with some of the most advanced technology ever. Some of the TVs used a new technology called Organic Light Emitting Diodes, or OLED. They were thinner, lighter, offered better color and were brighter than traditional LEDs.
 
Ultra High Definition TVs were also popular. Most of those on display used 4K technology, which has a resolution that is 4 times that of traditional 1080p HDTVs. Sharp Electronics showed off an 8K UHDTV. Its resolution is 16 times that of standard HDTVs.
 
Smart TVs this year were smarter. Many offered technology that let users have a more personalized experience. One such TV from the electronics company TCL uses sensors and voice recognition to determine who is watching. It then offers programming based on the specific user. Another TV from Panasonic offers a similar personalized user experience.
 
In addition to television technology, size also played a major part in CES 2013. Televisions varied in size from big to bigger, with at least two companies -- Samsung and HiSense -- exhibiting TVs measuring 110 inches.
 
The yearly Consumer Electronics Show is the biggest technology trade show in North America and one of the biggest in the world.
 
Gary Shapiro is president and CEO of the Consumer Electronics Association, the group that organizes CES. He gave one of the keynote speeches on opening day.  

“Now of course you know that CES is more than a trade show. It’s a gathering of the brightest minds and the top leaders from many industries and those seeking a glimpse into the future.”
 
That glimpse into the future included a look at digital health and fitness devices, which were also big at CES 2013. There were devices that track your activity and others that measure blood pressure, heart rate and weight. There was even a fork that tells you when you are eating too fast. 
 
Cars , smartphones, tablet computers and PCs also made news. And a 27-inch table computer drew quite a bit of attention.
 
CEA President Gary Shapiro says there was much to see but not nearly enough time to see it all.
 
“You cannot see the show in the four days that you have. We have over 3200 different countries showing over 20,000 new products in about 26 miles worth of exhibit space. It’s absolutely incredible.”
This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: salah ahmad from: palestine
01/17/2013 6:17 AM
fantastic


by: BIJU.P.Y. from: SOUTH INDIA
01/16/2013 4:23 PM
Wonderful exhibition. Companies are exhibiting with the latest technological assistace. The consumer or the buyer is brought in a mess as which one to select from such a wonderful variety of TVs. Any way, may be a change for the better. Thank you. And I'm glad that you are back again and is stronger than ever to get us served better.


by: Donatas from: Russia
01/16/2013 6:04 AM
"We have over 3200 different countries", - said CEA President Gary Shapiro. How much? Really?))


by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
01/15/2013 12:42 PM
I am glad some Japanese electronic companies like Sharp and Panasonic got some interests in this CES in Las Vegas because they are reported as their sales are sharply getting decreased recently due to emerging competitors like Korean Sumsang. High resolusion and size of TVs must inspire the consumers' perchasing interests. But I think the quality of TV is now near maximus beyond consumer's requests. In this point, I suppose personirization of TVs is more promissing sells of more TVs. So, I agree trends of electronic companies are going toward ubiquitous of electronic appliances. Every where, anytime and anyone could get any informatsions by electronics. I can not believe in such age coming. Honestly speaking, as for me, I do not want to come true such age. Don't you think no prediction is a some kind of pleasure?

Learn with The News

  • Employee seen behind glass door of Alibaba's company headquarters on the outskirts of Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, April 23, 2014.

    Audio Alibaba Seeks to Raise Billions in IPO

    The Chinese online company could raise $20 billion by selling stock to the public in the U.S. The company holds an 80 percent share of China’s online market. More

  • Ethnic Rohingya refugees from Myanmar wave as they are transported by a wooden boat to a temporary shelter in Krueng Raya in Aceh Besar, Indonesia, April 8, 2013.

    Audio UN: Boat People Fleeing Myanmar, Bangladesh

    The United Nations says there has been a sudden increase in people fleeing Myanmar and Bangladesh by boat. Activists fear the number will continue to rise as refugees leave unclean camps and violence in Myanmar. They say that is especially true of ethnic Rohingya. More

  • Morgan County dispatcher Larry Holmes talks with a woman reporting a domestic disturbance as deputies respond to her location Friday, April 28, 2007, in Versailles, Mo. Because the 911 call came in on a landline, the address of the disturbance was immedia

    Audio It's an Emergency in Any Language

    In most countries, people can make a telephone call to ask for medical or police help using just three numbers. In the European Union, the number is 1-1-2. Some Asian countries use 9-9-9. In North America, the number is 9-1-1. More

  • A UNICEF worker shares information on Ebola and best practices to help prevent its spread with residents of the Matam neighborhood of Conakry, Guinea in this handout photo courtesy of UNICEF taken Aug. 20, 2014.

    Audio Conflicts, Ebola Put More Demands on UNICEF

    UNICEF says August has been its busiest month for emergency airlifts in the past 10 years. Some of the supplies going to Syria and Iraq are designed to help children deal with the effects of conflict. Some have gone to Liberia for use against the disease Ebola. More

  • FILE - A Vietnamese boy looks at dairy products at a showroom of the Vietnam Dairy Products Co (Vinamilk) in Hanoi.

    Audio Vietnam, We Have a Nutrition Problem

    Vietnam has a nutrition problem: too many of its children are underweight. Yet more and more Vietnamese boys and girls are becoming overweight. The two conditions may appear to be separate, but they are linked. They are both the result of poor diets. More

Featured Stories

Practice Your Writing

Confessions of an English Learner BlogConfessions of an English Learner Blog

Tell us About Our Programs