November 24, 2014 08:01 UTC

Science & Technology

New Rules Aim to Improve US Food Safety

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American officials have proposed new rules aimed to increase food safety
American officials have proposed new rules aimed to increase food safety

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From VOA Learning English, this is the Agriculture Report in Special English.
 
Each year, bad food sickens about one in six Americans. Proposed new rules aim to improve food safety. Officials say the changes could prevent more than one million cases of food-related illnesses each year.
 
The new rules were proposed this month, exactly two years after President Obama signed the Food Safety Modernization Act. The rules are the first step in putting the law into effect, making the biggest changes in food safety since the 1930s.
 
The law makes the Food and Drug Administration responsible for preventing foodborne illnesses. Experts say this is a change from the role that the FDA has played in the past in reacting to disease outbreaks.
 
Congress passed the law after a series of outbreaks linked to bagged spinach, peanut butter and other foods. Margaret Hamburg is commissioner of the FDA.
 
They occurred because of problems that would have been addressed by these kinds of approaches. So I think, you know, we’re very optimistic that we will begin to see real change.”
 
The agency is proposing to require food manufacturers to show that they have identified where contamination is most likely to happen. Manufacturers would also have to show that they have taken steps to prevent it. The proposed rules also deal with safety in growing and harvesting fruits and vegetables.
 
The Congressional Budget Office estimates that establishing all of the provisions of the law will cost the government $1.4 billion. The Grocery Manufacturers of America, an industry group, has not released an estimate of what it will cost producers.
 
But FDA Deputy Commissioner Michael Taylor says the new rules are worth the price.
 
“Even if you just look at estimated reductions in illness, but if you also take into account avoiding disruption of the food supply and the loss of confidence in those commodities by consumers, so I think we’ll see that the benefits substantially outweigh the costs of implementation.”
 
Caroline Smith-DeWaal is director for food safety at the Center for Science in the Public Interest. She says the rules should have been released a year ago.
 
 “We’re really happy that the new rules have come out. They’re a little late.”
 
And she notes that they are not finished.
 
 “The bigger question is, where are the rules on imports that haven’t been released yet?”
 
The FDA says about 15 percent of food eaten by Americans is imported, and that share is growing. Rules have not been released yet to require imported foods to meet the same standards as food produced in the United States. But the agency says they are coming soon.
 
The rules released this month will not go into effect for more than a year. Final versions will be announced after the agency considers public comments. And experts point out that Congress will need to approve money to enforce the new rules.
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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Lisa from: HCM City, VN
01/17/2013 8:31 AM
When such kind of this rule can be applied in VN?!


by: BIJU.P.Y. from: SOUTH INDIA
01/16/2013 4:50 PM
The Americans are lucky enough to have an FDA and other official and unofficial agencies to ensure the quality of the food they eat. In south india such agencies are inactive and playing into the hands of the trades man. When money motivation gains the upper hand, human values goes deep down. Agencies and authorities should wake up from their slumber to ensure the quality of the food their citizens eat. Thanking you.


by: jazminetwo from: canada
01/15/2013 8:35 PM
Thanks
I'm glad that I found it


by: Marcos from: Brazil
01/15/2013 3:27 PM
Good news! I think this rule should happen across the planet! Stop with the poor quality of food!


by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
01/15/2013 11:32 AM
I think this proposed act is very American as it seems very practical. It is true nothing is more effective than prevention. I agree food manufacturerers should take account any contaminations and should take measures preventing incidences before sellimg products as possible as they can. But I am afraid the incidences might not decrease in number because incidences are incedences as they are not always predictable. I am also afraid this act would accelerate consumer's claim aginst food manufacturers like motorcycle riders who get injured by traffic accidents acuse road maintenance makers of the hollow of the road. I suppose consumers aloso should take some resposibilities for food linked illnesses. Those who chose and buy foods are no one but themselves.

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