July 31, 2015 03:04 UTC

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Do It Yourself: Raising Angora Goats

An Angora goat at a farmer's market in the state of Maine
An Angora goat at a farmer's market in the state of Maine


This is the VOA Special English Agriculture Report.

(SOUND)

Has anyone ever tried to get your goat? To "get your goat" is an expression. It means to make you mad. A good friend might tell you: "Don't worry about what that person said. He was just trying to get your goat."

But there are plenty of good reasons to get a goat -- and not just for milk or meat. The animals can help control weeds. They can be friendly with children and adults. And they can make money with their hair.

Cashmere goats produce cashmere. Angora goats produce -- no, not angora. Angora fiber comes from rabbits. Angora goats produce mohair. Mohair is used to make clothing, carpets and other products.

The goats came from the Anatolian plains. Their name comes from the Turkish city of Ankara. The Mohair Council of America says the first Angora goats arrived in the United States in eighteen forty-nine. Seven females and two males were imported.

Today the United States is one of the world's leading producers of mohair. The other top sources are South Africa and Turkey. Ninety percent of the mohair from the United States comes from Texas.

An adult Angora can produce as much as seven kilograms of hair each year. The value of the coat depends on the age, size and condition of the goat. As Angoras get older, their hair becomes thicker and less valuable.

The goats need their mother's milk for the first three or four months. They reach full maturity at about two years. But even then they are smaller than most sheep and milk goats.

Cashmere goats are usually larger than Angoras. Cashmere goats can grow big enough to be kept with sheep and cattle.

The outer hair of the animal is called guard hair. Behind it is the valuable material on a cashmere goat. Some farmers just comb their cashmere goats to remove the hair. But if the goats do get a haircut, it often happens when they would naturally lose their winter coat, between December and March.

Angora goats generally get their hair cut twice a year, in the spring and fall. Owners do it themselves or hire a professional shearer. An Angora without a coat can get cold. So it may need to be kept extra warm for about a month after shearing.

And that's the VOA Special English Agriculture Report. To read, listen and learn English with our stories, go to voaspecialenglish.com. You can also find captioned videos of our program at the VOA Learning English channel on YouTube. I'm ____________.

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Elaine
05/09/2012 6:11 AM
I want to get a lovely goat at home after reading...


by: Betty
05/09/2012 4:56 AM
As this radio says,goats are our friend.They are friendly with both children and adult and make money for us by the way even sacrificing their coats in winter.But you know maybe they are not willing to be sheared just for that they must make a living by human's feeding or they don't have ability to protest theirself from the invading. Therefore they bare it and alive...So try your best to treat them as a friend.


by: Yoshi
05/09/2012 4:01 AM
" Get your goat " seems similar to " make someone go nuts"
I understand goats are very varuable not only for milk and meat, but also for hair. If I lost my goats in Anatolian plains, I will have a lot of difficulties in dayly life and go mad !?


by: kronick
05/09/2012 1:15 AM
cliff, i can get u a goat!


by: zeng xiaoqing
05/08/2012 11:24 PM
can you show me how to douw load?


by: cliff
05/08/2012 2:22 PM
Very interesting! I'd like to get a goat rather then a dog, and maybe I can teach my goat watch the door...

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