December 21, 2014 06:14 UTC

Science & Technology

Huawei and ZTE Deny Claims That They Present a Security Threat to the United States

Bill Plummer, Huawei's vice president for external affairs in the US speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington, October 8, 2012Bill Plummer, Huawei's vice president for external affairs in the US speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington, October 8, 2012
x
Bill Plummer, Huawei's vice president for external affairs in the US speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington, October 8, 2012
Bill Plummer, Huawei's vice president for external affairs in the US speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington, October 8, 2012

Multimedia

Play or download an MP3 of this story
  • Huawei and ZTE Push Back Against Congressional Report

From VOA Learning English, this is the TECHNOLOGY REPORT in Special English.

Chinese telecommunications companies Huawei and ZTE have pushed back against accusations that they present a national security threat to the United States. The United States House Intelligence Committee released a report on the issue last week. Committee chairman, Republican Congressman Mike Rogers, spoke about the year-long investigation that led to the report.

“The investigation concluded that the risks associated with these companies providing equipment and services to U.S. critical infrastructure undermines the core U.S. national security interests.”
 
Dutch Ruppersberger, a Democrat, is a ranking member of the house committee.
 
“We already know the Chinese are aggressively hacking into our nation's networks, threatening our critical infrastructure, and stealing millions of dollars’ worth of trade secrets and other sensitive information from American companies.”
 
The report warned American companies against doing business with Huawei and ZTE. It also called on The Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States to block any purchases, takeovers, or mergers involving the two companies. And it advised officials in the United States to ban the use of equipment from these companies in their systems.

Both Huawei and ZTE released statements last week denying the reports’ claims. They said the report is an attempt to prevent Chinese companies from competing in the American market.

Chinese officials also reacted to the report. An official from China’s Commerce Ministry called the accusations groundless and untrue. He said the action by the United States violated its long-held free-market principles. And he said it would harm cooperation and development between the two countries.

Marc Maiffret is chief technology officer with Beyond Trust, a security and threat prevention company in the United States. He says the House Committee’s report may appear to be somewhat of a protectionist move. But, he says, China shares some responsibility in the matter.
 
“The complaints coming from them about the recent report, while maybe valid in some regards, come from a country that continues to have a large number of cyber-attacks, a large number of targeted attacks for intellectual property.  And I think in general it’s very hard to kind of make accusations against the U.S. or anybody when as a country yourself you have so many things that are happening from a cyber-security perspective.”
 
William Plummer is Huawei’s United States’ vice president of external relations. He said during an interview with the television program “60 Minutes” that “Huawei is a business in the business of doing business.” He said seventy percent of the company’s business comes from outside China. And he said Huawei is not going to “jeopardize its commercial success for any government.”
This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Alex
10/19/2012 9:35 AM
I think they need to do so.


by: swag from: ?
10/19/2012 4:53 AM
i love you usa


by: Anonymous
10/18/2012 2:37 PM
America already make the world disgusted.


by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
10/15/2012 5:30 AM
If the congress reports opened some cases in which American military or business seacrets were stolen by equipment of these two companies, this accusation would be more pursuasive for everyone. It is reported in Japan that U.S. congress is also concerned about the exisitence of party organizations in Chinese private companies in America. For this question, Chinese directers answered these organizations are obliged to set up in all Chinese, even joint companies to control employees' thoughts by Chinese communist party. These regurations might be barrier for Chinese companies planning to expand abroad because they couldn't manage employees as they like. I don't think national seacrets protected by U.S. agencies with all its efforts are cyber-attacked by Chinese companies. Eventhough It would be possible that CCP officials get large kickback from companies for its approval to business operation.


by: johnlee baplant rubicon from: vietnam
10/15/2012 2:06 AM
we always feel nauseating for what chineeses are doing for my country and the entire world, for instant: they smuggle high poisonous food and goods into my country. They have been doing lot of brutal actions to harm our citizens by brought down our economy, exporting unsafe food. not only with my nation, they are cunducting that kind of action to the whole world. everyone must be fear when hearing the word " chineese goods". It is time for us to be up against this devil, we must BOYCOTT any its productions, and UNCOOPERATIVE with its business

Learn with The News

  • Chinese President Xi Jinping, left, and U.S. President Obama participate in a welcome ceremony for President Obama at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

    Audio Is China Starting to Live its Dream?

    Trust in the American dream may be disappearing. But halfway around the world, a new dream has been gaining strength -- the Chinese dream. To be exact: President Xi Jinping’s Chinese dream. But, what is the Chinese dream? And how has President Xi started to make his dream for the country a reality? More

  • Audio I'm Dreaming of a White Christmas

    Music fills the air. Colorful lights shine brightly in windows. Children and adults open gifts from loved ones and friends. These are all Christmas traditions. Another tradition is snow. In many places, a blanket of clean white snow covers the ground on Christmas Day, making it a "White Christmas." More

  • FILE - A Muslim woman releases a dove as a symbol of peace during a rally against the Islamic State group in Jakarta, Indonesia, Sept. 5, 2014.

    Audio Indonesia Reports Increase in Citizens Joining Islamic State

    Indonesia estimates that more than 350 of its citizens are now in Syria or Iraq to fight with Islamic State militants. That would represent an increase of 50 since last month. Most of the Indonesian fighters do not come directly from their homeland, but from other countries where they may be working More

  • Audio Turkey Rejects Criticism of Raids on Opposition Media

    Turkish officials say recent arrests of more than 20 journalists were made in connection with a plot against the government. But the European Union says Turkey is increasingly becoming more authoritarian. It said the media raids were in conflict with European values. More

  • US Cuba

    Audio Obama Moves to Normalize Relations with Cuba

    President Barack Obama announced a major change in United States’ policy toward Cuba this week. He said he wants Congress to ease more than 50 years of U.S. sanctions against the island nation. And he said the two nations should once again formally recognize one another. More

Featured Stories

  • Video Music Shows in Private Homes Gain Popularity

    Attending a live musical performance, be it in a huge arena or a small cafe, is an exciting experience. But here in the U.S., a very different kind of performance is gaining popularity: house concerts. “There's just a totally unique experience as opposed to playing like a coffee shop or a bar." More

  • Lee Surrenders to Grant at Appomatox

    Audio Southern General Robert E. Lee Surrenders at Appomattox

    General Robert E. Lee’s military skill and intelligence helped extend the war between the states. But even his skill could not save the South from the industrial power of the North and its mighty armies -- armies that were better-fed and better-equipped. On Sunday, August 9, Lee surrendered. More

  • Uganda Playground for Disabled Children

    Audio Helping Uganda’s Disabled Children Play

    You may think that all children have freedom to play. But for children who look differently from others or have physical disabilities, the idea of play can seem far away. An organization in Uganda is seeking to change that. Read on to learn words needed to talk about this sometimes difficult topic. More

  • A microneedle used to inject glaucoma medications into the eye is shown next to a liquid drop from a conventional eye dropper. (Georgia Tech Photo: Gary Meek

    Audio Tiny Needles Treat Eye Disease

    Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness around the world. In the United States, more than two million people suffer from the disease. Now, researchers are developing very small needles that may offer a more effective and painless treatment for glaucoma and other eye diseases. More

  • The National Museum of Organized Crime and Law Enforcement in Las Vegas

    Audio Mob Museum Tells About the Mafia in America

    The U.S. government has long used public money to fight organized crime. Now, public money is also paying for a museum in Las Vegas to tell about "The Mob,” and not everyone is happy about that. But some say it helps the local economy by bringing people to a part of Las Vegas that few visit. More

Practice Your Writing

Confessions of an English Learner BlogConfessions of an English Learner Blog

Tell us About Our Programs