July 30, 2015 04:04 UTC

Science & Technology

Indonesians Using Smartphones to Connect to the Internet

Most use lower cost mobiles called feature phones or smartphones lite | TECHNOLOGY REPORT

A BlackBerry device is shown in front of products displayed in a glass cabinet at the Research in Motion offices in Waterloo November 14, 2012.
A BlackBerry device is shown in front of products displayed in a glass cabinet at the Research in Motion offices in Waterloo November 14, 2012.

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From VOA Learning English, this is the Technology Report.
 
Twenty-three-year old Rio Safiyanto sells face masks, or coverings, for about 30 cents each in central Jakarta, Indonesia. He makes enough money to buy a cell phone that permits him to visit websites like Facebook and Twitter, as well as finding gaming applications, or apps.
 
Rio Safiyanto says every average person has a cellphone. He likes having one because he can talk to his family when he is away from home. And, he is especially pleased that he can use it to listen to music. Mr. Safiyanto’s phone has a keypad that makes it look like a Blackberry.
 
It is known as a feature phone or smartphone lite. That is because it is cheaper and cannot perform as many actions as more advanced phones like the Apple iPhone.
 
These devices make up the majority of cell phones sold around the world. They have proven more successful in places like Indonesia, where some smartphones cost 700 dollars or more. Although many lower-income users are new to smartphones, they are quickly learning to use the technology.
 
Eddy Tamboto is the managing director of the Jakarta office of the Boston Consulting Group. He explains the importance of having a mobile phone.
 
“It’s basically the way they get to know about employment opportunities, the way they get to know about entrepreneurial opportunities. So the phone and the smartphone is not just a convenience or indulgence, but, actually, it’s a big part of day to day necessity”.
 
Cell manufacturer Nokia offers a service called Life Tools. For a small monthly payment, the company sends text messages to farmers. The messages tell of weather conditions, crop prices, agricultural news and give other advice.
 
Local businessman Aldi Haryopratomo has developed a way for small store owners to sell things like prepaid cellphone minutes and life insurance through text messages. Ruma is the company that developed the technology. The company is working on a system that will notify people about jobs in their area.
 
At a recent digital technology show in Jakarta, banks offered no-interest financing for credit card purchases. Marina Luthfiani manages a mobile shop in the area. She said almost everyone can buy a smartphone because of competitive financing and credit choices. She says Indonesians like to buy the latest devices.
 
A report last June by Semiocast, a French internet research company, said Jakarta was the world’s top tweeting city, ahead of Tokyo and London.
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Comments
     
by: Bach tran from: Việt Nam
04/18/2013 2:25 PM
I really like my mobiphone, because it's not only the advice to call, it's also a dictionary, a friend that help me learing english :)


by: Tuan from: Saigon, VN
04/18/2013 11:55 AM
Cell phone is so great. It is a indispensible device in this dynamic world.

Although many people prefer the latest and the most advanced versions of cell phone, l am still in favor of a casual cheap one. Calling and listening to music and texting are enough for me. In point of fact, the more modern and costly your phone is, the more worries you will have.


by: Minh Tuan Nguyen from: Hanoi, VietNam
04/18/2013 9:26 AM
I bought an apple ip 1week ago, and I see it is very convenient for studing, relaxing...


by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
04/18/2013 9:09 AM
Do you use smartphones to call someone? I guess probably not. It could be said now, smartphones are not phones but devices to get informations. Do you have any other names appropriate for its real use?


by: Olimar Oliveira from: Caetite , Bahia, Brasil
04/16/2013 9:53 PM
I m fanatic of smartphone, I have a iphone from apple and I like to seach apps new, as to consult banks, to see the weather, to play games and another apps. I like very much this text.


by: Deocleciano Tavares Neto from: Caetité, Bahia, Brasil
04/16/2013 9:40 PM
I have no smartfone i am very simple, but i like to read informacion about any goods because i intend buy one. they are better than cel fone.


by: Maikel Marques from: Maceió, Brazil
04/15/2013 10:47 AM
It happnes almost the same here in Maceió, in the State of Alagoas, Brazil. We have more mobile phones than citizens. More than 80% of phones are smartphones. In geneneral, people use then to send information or access internet. There is no doubt: the devices makes our lives easier and easier.

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