April 19, 2015 21:03 UTC

In the News

Search for Malaysian Airplane Ends Third Week

A crew member looks out an observation window from a Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) AP-3C Orion aircraft while searching for the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 over the southern Indian Ocean, March 26, 2014.
A crew member looks out an observation window from a Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) AP-3C Orion aircraft while searching for the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 over the southern Indian Ocean, March 26, 2014.

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From VOA Learning English, this is In The News.
 
The search for a missing Malaysian airliner continued this week.  The airplane carrying 239 passengers and crew members disappeared on March 8th.  Last Monday, Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak announced the flight ended in the southern Indian Ocean.
 
“We wanted to inform you of this new development at the earliest opportunity.” 
 
Satellite records show that Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 likely crashed in the southern Indian Ocean.  Malaysian officials say the flight ended west of the Australian city of Perth.
 
Australian Defense Minister David Johnston describes the waters in that area as an extremely difficult environment.
 
“Remember, this Southern Ocean, has shipwrecked many, many sailors in our history in Western Australia.  It is rough.  There are 20-, 30-meter waves.  It is very, very dangerous, even for big ships.” 
 
Chinese Protest Malaysian Delays Releasing Information
 
The Boeing 777 aircraft was flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing at the time of its disappearance.  On Tuesday, protesters marched toward the Malaysian embassy in Beijing.  They were angry about the way Malaysian officials have reacted to the disappearance of Flight 370.  The protesters demanded more information.  
                                                                   
The same day, Malaysia Airlines officials met with reporters.  They defended their decision to inform families and the world that Malaysian officials now consider the flight lost. 

Two-thirds of the passengers were Chinese.  The Australian government is easing visa and immigration rules to permit relatives to travel to Perth.  The city’s Chinese community has offered to assist the visitors.
 
Critics say Malaysia has been keeping information from victims’ families and the media.  The British satellite company Inmarsat told Malaysian officials four days after the disappearance that they had received hourly signals from the plane.  Yet the officials were said to have waited three days before acting on that information. 
                      
John Goglia has investigated plane crashes for the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board.  He noted Malaysia’s lack of experience with air disasters.
 
“In this particular instance, what had come out certainly seemed disconnected.  Seemed like they didn’t follow any of the known processes that had been established for years and years.” 
 
Other Southeast Asian countries were quick to join the search.  But they were slow to share radar or satellite information with Malaysia about possible sightings. 
 
Malaysia is in a difficult position.  Some observers say it does not want to anger China.  Yet China’s Global Times newspaper published editorials blaming Malaysia’s government.  One piece read: “Malaysia is determined to enter the ranks of developed countries by 2020.  But judging from its handling of the MH370 incident, Malaysia’s modernization will take far longer than this.”
                                                                   
Malaysia has a growing tourist industry.  Last year, 1.8 million Chinese visited the country.  But this could change because of Flight 370. 
                                                                   
On Thursday, China’s Foreign Ministry again called for more exact information from Malaysia on the details of the search.  A spokesman said he hoped Malaysia would improve its communications with China.
 
This continues to be a developing story. For the latest information, go to VOANews.com
 
And that’s In The News from VOA Learning English.  I’m Steve Ember.
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Search for Malaysian Airplane Enters Third Week

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Comments page of 2
    Next 
by: Dawn_Yvette from: NJ
04/11/2014 6:28 PM
In my opinion, Malaysia would definitely lost a considerable amount of Chinese visitors. And there's rumor said someone on the plane abduct the passengers. The plane was gone disappearing is because the Malaysia government failed negotiating with the abductors. What a tragedy......T^T


by: jansen from: boston
04/04/2014 3:02 AM
I think this is a serious matter to Malaysia that affect country's economy.Malaysia has a growing tourist industry,this matter probably serious impact Malaysia tourist industry.Actually,Malaysia has always been a poor country,so Malaysia government must limited this very important matter.Also,Malaysia government lack experience.

The Malaysia airline matter serious effect what Malaysia enter ranks of developed countries.Malaysia's modernization will spent more time than before.


by: Nelson from: Brazil
04/01/2014 10:02 PM
Hope for everyone!


by: Awas from: Indonesia
04/01/2014 3:27 PM
Don't blame Malaysia for this tragedy, it's really beyond our control . The missing and accident of MH370 is so mysterious. Many countries have joined together to found the plane but still in vain!!

In Response

by: smsm from: cairo
04/09/2014 4:53 PM
you are absolutely right


by: hallozusammen from: Shanghai
04/01/2014 4:54 AM
It is very useful for people learning english.


by: Claudinei Francisco from: Brazila
03/31/2014 3:55 PM
I feel very sad about the families.


by: Mindu from: Vietnam
03/31/2014 2:48 AM
Following my point of view, in the modern generation with flooding high-tech searching machines and others, this disappearance is absolutely a mystery. I consider that Malaysia gave their sad official announcement about lost of MH370 in Australia West to reduce pressure from victims's families and take time for searching. That means they try to persuade unlucky passengers and crew members's relatives to accept an unacceptable reailty. Anyway, Malaysian goverment is facing an enermous challenge in economic, tourism, national airline, people trust... extremely drop and they still need to do a lots to get them back for future development, beside taking this mystery to light... God bless to them!

In Response

by: Mai from: Vietnam
04/03/2014 9:23 AM
So many babble information about this aircraft. It's good you have some positive visions about this as well as the sympathy with Malaysian Government. I hope this matter can be uncovered soon by real evidences so that people around the world will not be in doubt anymore.


by: BIJU.P.Y from: SOUTH INDIA
03/30/2014 12:51 AM
The Malasian govt. was too slow to react to the disaster. They sought help after a long hours' of silence. By then 'the golden moments' to save many lives were over. This tragedy reveals human limitations even at the midst of all man's sophisticated inventions. The mysteries and horror of the Indian ocean joined hands with the worst known climate to further make against the search operations. But it is very pity that the rest of the world could not recover any material evidence of the tragedy, yet. Now, I also share the grief of the departed souls' relatives with a feeling of being smashed under. Thank you.


by: sallaheddin from: algeria
03/29/2014 8:30 PM
I would like thank the VOA Learning English site,and Steve Ember exactly .


by: Marie-Danielle O'Reilly from: Switzerland
03/29/2014 8:24 PM
Very sad and true story. Thank you !

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