September 02, 2014 16:46 UTC

Education

Vietnamese Man Wants a “Book Revolution” in his Country

Read, listen and learn English with this story. Double-click on any word to find the definition in the Merriam-Webster Learner's Dictionary.

Three school children use books borrowed from a library established by philanthropist Nguyen Quang Thach
Three school children use books borrowed from a library established by philanthropist Nguyen Quang Thach

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From VOA Learning English, this is the Education Report in Special English.
 
A Vietnamese man hopes to raise the quality of education in his country by building “parent libraries” in rural schools. Nguyen Quang Thach provides libraries to the schools so books are more available in farming communities. He works with publishers in Hanoi to get the books at reduced rates for teachers and their students.
 
Mr. Thach says most schools have enough textbooks. But he says many poor families have few books at home and do not visit school libraries. He learned this by talking with farmers, workers and students. 
 
More than 90 percent of Vietnam’s population can read and write. But academic performance in the schools remains low compared to other Southeast Asian nations. Corruption is a big part of the problem. Vietnamese media often have stories about teachers giving high grades in exchange for money.
 
Some experts criticize teaching methods that depend heavily on dictation. They say asking students to repeat everything a teacher says to the class harms their ability to think for themselves.  
 
Nguyen Quang Thach says he wants people to invest money in books for a better future. To date, almost 1,000 parent libraries have been built in Thai Binh  Province. Hundreds of books are in each one. Several other provinces have copied this model.
 
For each school, Mr. Thach helps build libraries for up to four classes. Other people then follow his example. Parents of school children pay three dollars each for the first year and one dollar in other years.
 
The head of the AnDuc secondary school, Pham Duc Duong, told reporter Marianne Brown that Mr. Thach’s work has improved the quality of education.
 
“He says students have been doing better in competitions, especially in social science.”
 
Duong Le Nga heads the school youth group. She says that after the libraries were built, students started asking teachers more questions. The students also set up debating teams. She thinks Mr. Thach’s example helps student think more creatively -- “outside the box.”
 
The deputy head of the school, Uong Minh Thanh, says many students there will work in factories. But after seeing the influence of the new libraries, he hopes the children will set high goals for themselves.
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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: JANG from: Thailand
12/16/2012 3:59 PM
I think that education is very important to developing countries.This book is an important to help children receive the knowledge. So, I hope that Vietnamese education will be better in the future.


by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
12/15/2012 1:52 AM
I'm sorry but it is a bit unbiguous for me what parent library means. It means parents pay for buying books for building school libraries? Or pay for using libraries? Do parents also visit school libraries? What means "build libraries for up to four classes"?

In Response

by: ngoan from: austria
12/16/2012 2:16 PM
Hi, It means that the parents of children pay little money (only 3$ first year and 1$ another years) to contribute in buying books in the library. In Vietnam, most of libraries have been set up by school or state's fund. By this way, there is much more money to invest on books and also promote the children to read books.

In Response

by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
12/17/2012 10:20 AM
Hi ngoan, thank you for your answer. Now I understand Vietnamese parents contribute to school library by paying money in each school. Thank you.


by: John Woo
12/14/2012 11:55 PM
As mentioned in the report, corruption is a big part of many kind of problems in developing countiers such as China and other Southeast Asian nations.
There would be no good business and economy with corruption.

In Response

by: Duc Anh from: Ha Noi
12/16/2012 9:44 AM
are you John Wood who created "Room to read"?


by: Adriana from: Brazil
12/14/2012 11:30 AM
Books are part of the way for a better education. Congratulations!


by: LinhTrongle from: VietNam
12/14/2012 9:24 AM
Nguyen Quang Thach says he wants people to invest money in books for a better future. To date, almost 1,000 parent libraries have been built in Thai Benh Province. Hundreds of books are in each one. Several other provinces have copied this model.
-----------------
Nguyen Quang Thach says he wants people to invest money in books for a better future. To date, almost 1,000 parent libraries have been built in Thai Binh Province. Hundreds of books are in each one. Several other provinces have copied this model.


by: Thao from: Ho Chi Minh City
12/14/2012 6:27 AM
Education plays an important role in developing a country, so I hope that Vietnamese education will be better in the future...


by: Phuong Nga from: Vietnam
12/14/2012 2:35 AM
There is a mistake in this article. There is not any "Thai Benh province" in Vietnam.


by: Viet
12/14/2012 2:09 AM
The name of province is misspell. It should be "Thai Binh" not "Thai Benh"

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