July 29, 2015 15:55 UTC

Words and Their Stories

The City of Brotherly Love, and Beantown

Fireworks explode over the Philadelphia Museum of Art during an Independence Day celebration, July 4, 2013, in Philadelphia.Fireworks explode over the Philadelphia Museum of Art during an Independence Day celebration, July 4, 2013, in Philadelphia.
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Fireworks explode over the Philadelphia Museum of Art during an Independence Day celebration, July 4, 2013, in Philadelphia.
Fireworks explode over the Philadelphia Museum of Art during an Independence Day celebration, July 4, 2013, in Philadelphia.

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Now, the VOA Special English program, Words and Their Stories.
 
Almost all American cities have nicknames. They help establish a city’s identity. They can also spread unity and pride among its citizens. 
 
Two east coast cities -- Philadelphia and Boston -- were both important in the early history of the United States. Philadelphia is best known as “The City of Brotherly Love.”

Fireworks explode over the Philadelphia Museum of Art during an Independence Day celebration, Thursday, July 4, 2013, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)Fireworks explode over the Philadelphia Museum of Art during an Independence Day celebration, Thursday, July 4, 2013, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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Fireworks explode over the Philadelphia Museum of Art during an Independence Day celebration, Thursday, July 4, 2013, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Fireworks explode over the Philadelphia Museum of Art during an Independence Day celebration, Thursday, July 4, 2013, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
In 1681, King Charles the Second, of England, gave William Penn a large amount of land to establish a colony. The king named the colony Pennsylvania in honor of Penn’s father. William Penn was a Quaker. He brought his beliefs about equality, religious freedom and brotherly love to this new land. Penn was also an expert in Latin and Greek. He established a city and named it Philadelphia, which is Greek for “brotherly love.” An ancient city called Philadelphia was also noted in Christianity’s holy book, the Bible.
 
Philadelphia became the social, political and geographical center of the American colonies. In the late 1700s, many events that took place in Philadelphia gave birth to the American Revolution and independence. For example, the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution were signed in the city. Philadelphia was the temporary capital of the new nation from 1790 to 1800.   
 
Some of Philadelphia’s other nicknames are “The Quaker City,”  “The Cradle of Liberty” and “The Birthplace of America.” Philadelphia is a long name. So many people just call it “Philly.”

A Philly cheese steakA Philly cheese steak
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A Philly cheese steak
A Philly cheese steak
Boston is another important city. It is one of the oldest cities in the United States. In 1630, Puritan settlers from England established Boston in what would become the state of Massachusetts.
 
Several major events took place in Boston before and during the American Revolution. You may have heard of the Boston Massacre, the Boston Tea Party and the Battle of Bunker Hill.

​So, like Philadelphia, Boston is called “The Cradle of Liberty.” Another nickname is “The Cradle of Modern America.”

Re-enactors march away from the Old State House following a public reading of the United States Declaration of Independence, part of July Fourth Independence Day celebrations, in Boston, Massachusetts July 4, 2013.Re-enactors march away from the Old State House following a public reading of the United States Declaration of Independence, part of July Fourth Independence Day celebrations, in Boston, Massachusetts July 4, 2013.
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Re-enactors march away from the Old State House following a public reading of the United States Declaration of Independence, part of July Fourth Independence Day celebrations, in Boston, Massachusetts July 4, 2013.
Re-enactors march away from the Old State House following a public reading of the United States Declaration of Independence, part of July Fourth Independence Day celebrations, in Boston, Massachusetts July 4, 2013.
However, Boston's most famous nickname is “Beantown.” But it was not because the city grew a lot of beans. In the 1700s, Boston was a major trading center. It received a lot of sugarcane from the West Indies. Beans baked in molasses -- a sugar product -- became a favorite food in the city.  Today, no companies there make Boston baked beans. Restaurants in Boston rarely serve it. But many Americans eat this tasty dish at home.


This program was written by Shelley Gollust. I’m Barbara Klein. You can find more Words and Their Stories at our website, voaspecialenglish.com.


 

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: luiseylse from: venezuela
09/13/2013 1:45 AM
I found it interesting the article on socio-political origins of Philadefia and Boston.
Only knew about their baseball teams.


by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
09/10/2013 12:30 AM
Thank you for some interesting photos depicting events and foods of Philly and Boston. I learned online that Philly has ten sister cities including Kobe in Japan. Brotherly love extends to siblings love.Thank you.


by: BIJU.P.Y. from: SOUTH INDIA
09/09/2013 3:47 PM
Amazingly great! These colorful expressions are born out of the poignant or sweet events related to her culture, geography, religion, etiquitte, rituals, festivals e.t.c. So each nick name enhances the binding unity among her citizens. Each name evoks a riplet of memories in every American's hearts. It also appears interesting to new learners of English like me. Thank you for your delicious feast. So what shakespeare has made out through a character 'so don't miss our royal feast' next time.


by: Nuvia
09/09/2013 12:09 PM
I like to know the American history across this articles.


by: Myriam Ríos from: Colombia
09/08/2013 4:56 PM
This paragraph is very interest and I learn about this nicknames. I am from Colombia and I am learning English.

Thanks very much.


by: Soko
09/08/2013 2:19 PM
Thank you


by: palermo from: Azul, Argentina
09/08/2013 9:57 AM
Thank you very much for this unvaluable work for us, keep doing this, please.
Greetings from Argentina.

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