October 23, 2014 04:29 UTC

Health Report

UN Says Family Planning Pays Big for Developing Countries

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Savio Niwagaba of Uganda holds his newborn baby as his wife Chrisente, behind him, has a contraceptive implant placed in her armSavio Niwagaba of Uganda holds his newborn baby as his wife Chrisente, behind him, has a contraceptive implant placed in her arm
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Savio Niwagaba of Uganda holds his newborn baby as his wife Chrisente, behind him, has a contraceptive implant placed in her arm
Savio Niwagaba of Uganda holds his newborn baby as his wife Chrisente, behind him, has a contraceptive implant placed in her arm

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  • UN Says Family Planning Pays Big for Developing Countries

From VOA Learning English, this is the Health Report in Special English.  
 
A new report says greater access to family planning methods would save developing countries more than eleven billion dollars a year. The United Nations Population Fund says the savings would come from reduced costs of care for mothers and newborn babies.
 
These are some of the findings from this year's "State of World Population" report:
 
Two hundred twenty-two million women in developing countries cannot get birth control or other family planning services. An investment of four billion dollars a year would provide these women with reproductive information to reduce unplanned pregnancies and unsafe abortions.
 
An investment of about two billion dollars a year would provide enough contraceptives to meet the needs of developing countries.
 
The report says increased access to family planning is a good economic investment. Having fewer children has long paid a so-called demographic dividend to rich countries in Europe and North America. Population Fund spokeswoman Diane Stewart says one-third of the growth of Asia's "tiger" economies is the result of increased use of family planning services.
 
"To be able to choose the number of children and when you start having children, so that has dramatically changed the way people live in many countries. They're able to live longer and healthier lives because of family planning, and it also has a positive multiplier effect on development because of the increased savings that are possible within the family and the investment in economic growth that that brings about."
 
Sub-Saharan Africa has some of the biggest unmet needs for family planning services. The report says modern contraceptives are not widely available in countries such as Chad and Niger. But Ms. Stewart says providing contraceptives in developing countries is not enough. There are social, political and legal barriers that prevent access to birth control. In many cultures, women are encouraged to have large families and to avoid or limit the use of contraceptives.
 
The Population Fund says family planning helps countries reduce poverty. A recent study said Nigeria's economy would grow by at least thirty billion dollars if the fertility rate fell by just one child per woman in the next twenty years.
 
Ms. Stewart says family planning is a global challenge.
 
"There are unmet needs for family planning in every country in the world. And a lot of that has to do with poor, disadvantaged, marginalized groups in many countries who don't have access to the kinds of services and products that they need in order to plan their own families, space their children and prevent unintended pregnancies."
 
She says studies show that abortion rates fall in countries where people have access to modern methods of family planning.
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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: akito from: japan
12/04/2012 5:09 PM
there are a lot of childs who doesn't have enough food in the developing country. this news teaches me one of the reason. it is that the familly planning isn't controlled. so the contraceptives should be used in the right manner.


by: wxxyhcg from: china
11/29/2012 7:27 AM
It helps me understand that the birth control is very important.


by: Yang from: Canada
11/28/2012 2:59 PM
Admittedly,birth control is a good way to improve the economy.The children living in the family with few kids could get better education and more care as well.


by: Shige from: Japan
11/27/2012 5:50 AM
It is good to make contraceptives widely available in developing countries. I think the number of unplanned pregnancies and unsafe abortion should be reduce by family planning.


by: Yan from: Macau
11/27/2012 5:47 AM
it is easy to understand the meaning of this passage. Because the words in this passage is easy and the speaker's pronounce is clear and not too fast.


by: huy from: VN
11/26/2012 4:05 AM
THis report is very useful. It helps me understand that the birth control is very important. The other families in my country have a backward tradition, they want the woman to born reproductive plenty. They always hope that the children will serve them but but they do not know how that will affect other issues. That is the reason to show my country can not be rich although it's just a small reason.

In Response

by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
11/27/2012 3:12 PM
This is probably Japanese common understanding concernning about Vietnamese people that you eat rice and are a diligent and generous nation the same as Japanese of several decades ago. I don't know why but I'm sure we Japanese have much sympathy for Vietnamese. I hope Vietnam would keep developement more than now and join industrialized countries.


by: dina from: cambodia
11/23/2012 5:59 AM
good


by: Minami no Teio from: Japan
11/23/2012 12:15 AM
I don't understand why they need investment to access the family planning. They just need thinking by themselves how many kids do you need. Isn't is so simple?

In Response

by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
11/27/2012 8:04 AM
Yes, I agree with part of your opinion. Primarily, it depends on married couples to determine how many children they would have.
But this article implys there still remains a traditional thoghts for women demanding to raising babies as many as possible with no consideration to couple's need in some developling counries. In order to change such a prejudice from society, not a few of invest would be needed for example in reeducating residents of community.


by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
11/22/2012 3:42 AM
Yes, I agree family planning for sure helps developing countires' economy grows because, in addition to cost-cut of care for mothers and newborn babies, women are set free from child care and could have a time to get skills and to work. Married couples should have enough knowledge about controlled reproduction and contraceptive.

In Response

by: phan from: viet nam
12/03/2012 11:39 AM
thank you very much !

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