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Education

Puberty Lessons for African Girls May Raise Attendance

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  • Puberty Lessons for African Girls May Raise Attendance

From VOA Learning English, this is the Education Report in Special English.
 
A new study shows that simple, low-cost interventions can help teenage girls in Africa stay in school during their monthly periods. 
 
Paul Montgomery led the study. He is a professor in the Department of Social Policy and Intervention at Oxford University in England.
 
"Women are the driving force of economic development across Africa. And so it's particularly important to do what you can to keep girls going to school."
 
One hundred twenty girls in Ghana took part in the study. They were an average of almost sixteen years old. They attended three secondary schools in urban areas and one in a rural area
 
In the study, girls at two of the schools received free sanitary pads and lessons on puberty. Their attendance increased by an average of six days, or nine percent, during a sixty-five-day term.
 
The puberty lessons included information about personal care during menstruation. The girls also learned about the biology of their developing bodies and about pregnancy.
 
At the third school, the girls received the lessons but not the free pads. Attendance by these girls also improved by nine percent, but that took about five months.
 
At the fourth school the girls did not receive the pads or the lessons. That group showed no improvement in school attendance.
 
Professor Montgomery says the girls in the study had several reasons for missing school during their monthly bleeding. A majority expressed embarrassment about the changes in their bodies.
 
"Embarrassment was a big part of it, certainly, and that was reported by well over half the girls. But ignorance, I think, was a very big part of it, too, and they just didn't know what they were doing."
 
He says the interventions might not only keep girls from missing school, but also reduce teen pregnancies.
 
"I think one of the things menstruation does is that it signals the onset of the girl transitioning into womanhood. And that in turn, I think, sets them up to get pregnant. So I think we'll be able to help reduce teen pregnancy, improve their entering the labor market and the economic development of those women."
 
The Public Library of Science published the study in its journal PLOS One. A larger study is taking place in Uganda until twenty fifteen. The Oxford professor says the hope is to learn more about the effects of puberty on school attendance.
 
"So, we already know that education is important. We know that pads are important. We know that both are important. And we 'll be able to separate out these key issues, and then be able to give some really strong advice for development officers as far as sub-Saharan Africa is concerned."
 
And that's the VOA Special English Education Report. I'm Laurel Bowman.
 
___
 
Contributing: Joe De Capua and Jerilyn Watson
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Comments
     
by: Thu Trang from: Viet Nam
11/17/2012 11:54 AM
I feel very surprised when puberty lessons can affect the school attendance of girls in Africa. But I'm sure, the girls have a little knowledge about their monthly bleeding and menstruation. It's so good when there have more and more non-profit organizations find way to help girls in Africa.


by: jamesdicesi from: nyc
11/12/2012 8:35 PM
slargon http://slargon.com/ is by far the most fun way to learn English


by: Shige from: Japan
11/12/2012 5:38 AM
I have taken it for granted girls receive puberty lessons in school until I read this article. But in fact, the amount of girls who can receive puberty lessons is not so many in Africa.

It is surprising that puberty lessons relates to increase of girls' attendance.


by: Annisa from: Indonesia
11/12/2012 2:09 AM
I agree that puberty lesson for African girls is very important. It may raise attandance but it needs control, monitoring, evaluation and consistency. Reduce teen pregnancies is not easy. It should have strong commitment from government, school, parents and any department which related.


by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
11/08/2012 6:48 AM
Online says the school atendence rate is 59.3 % for girls and 72.3% for boys in Ghana recently. Its literacy rate is reported 65.8% in total. It must be useful in order to raise gair's attendence rate to envestigate the role of puberty on it.

義務教育年数 9年 (2009)
識字率(女) 59.3% (2008)
識字率(男) 72.3% (2008)

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