November 23, 2014 01:52 UTC

USA

American History: America's Break with Britain Divides Families and Friends

Read, listen and learn English with this story. Double-click on any word to find the definition in the Merriam-Webster Learner's Dictionary.

"Burgoyne's surrender at Saratoga" by artist Percy Moran, c1911
"Burgoyne's surrender at Saratoga" by artist Percy Moran, c1911
► Listen to this story in high-quality 192 kbps audio (or right-click/option-click to save)

STEVE EMBER: From VOA Learning English, this is THE MAKING OF A NATION – American history in Special English. I'm Steve Ember.
 
This week in our series, we continue our story of the American Revolution.
 
On July fourth, seventeen seventy-six, the Second Continental Congress, meeting in Philadelphia, approved the Declaration of Independence. The new country, the United States of America, was at war with its former colonial ruler, Britain. Yet not everyone in the former colonies agreed with the decision to declare independence.
 
No one knows for sure how many Americans remained loyal to Great Britain. John Adams, the Massachusetts political leader, thought that about a third of the colonists supported independence, a third supported Britain and a third supported neither side.
 
Today many historians think that only about twenty percent of the colonists supported Britain. Some colonists supported whichever side seemed to be winning.
 
As many as thirty thousand Americans fought for the British during the war. Others helped Britain by reporting the movements of American troops.
 
Who supported Britain? These groups included people who were appointed to their jobs by the king. They also included leaders of the Anglican Church and people with business connections to the British.
 
Professor Gordon Wood at Brown University in Rhode Island says many colonists from minority groups remained loyal to the king.
 
"One of the problems of the American revolution that emerged very quickly was the tyranny of the majority, which the founders, revolutionary leaders, had not anticipated. But I think we're seeing the problems that emerge when you overthrow an authoritarian leader, and you're going to have a relatively democratic society. Then the protecting the minority becomes a problem.”
 
Other people remained loyal because they did not want change or because they believed that independence would not improve their lives. Some thought the actions of the British government were not bad enough to bring about a rebellion. Others did not believe that the rebels could win a war against a nation as powerful as Britain.
 
American Indians disagreed among themselves about the revolution. Congress knew it had to make peace with the Indians as soon as the war started. If not, American troops might have to fight them and the British at the same time. To prevent trouble, American officials tried to stop settlers from moving onto Indian lands.
 
In some places, the Indians joined the Americans, but generally they supported the British. They expected the British to win. They saw the war as a chance to force the Americans to leave their lands. At times, the Indians fought on the side of the British, but left when the British seemed to be losing the battle.
 
The Americans did not forget that the Indians chose to fight for the British. When the war was over, the Americans felt they owed the Indians nothing.
 
African slaves in the colonies were also divided about which side to join during the American Revolution.
 
Thousands of slaves fought for the British. The British offered them freedom if they served in the army or navy.
 
Some American states also offered to free slaves who served, and hundreds of free blacks fought on the American side. Many slaves, however, felt their chances for freedom were better with the British.  
 
At least five thousand blacks served with the colonial American forces. Most had no choice. They were slaves, and their owners took them to war or sent them instead of the owners' sons.
 
Other slaves felt that a nation built on freedom might share some of that freedom with them.
 
In the South, many slave owners kept their slaves at home rather than send them to fight. Later in the war, when every man was needed, many slaves drove wagons and carried supplies. Those who served in the colonial army and navy were not separated from whites. They fought side by side with whites during the American Revolution.
 
But historians say most slaves spent the war as they always had: working on their owners' farms.
 
The American rebels called themselves patriots. Those who supported the British were known as Tories. Patriots often seized the property of Tories to help pay for the war. They also kidnapped the slaves of Tories to use as laborers for the army. Many Tories were forced from towns in which they had lived all their lives. Some were tortured or hanged.
 
In New Jersey, Tories and patriots fought one another with guns, and sometimes burned each other's houses and farms.
 
Some historians say the American Revolution was really the nation's first civil war. The revolution divided many families.
 
Jayne Gordon at the Massachusetts Historical Society tells of a woman named Phoebe. Phoebe was married to a patriot. But her brother was a Tory.
 
"And we think of what it must've been like for Phoebe, in the middle between her husband and her brother. So that's a perfect example of a family that was split."
 
The patriots were also split among themselves in their thinking. The colonies did not really think of themselves as one nation. They saw themselves as independent states trying to work together toward a common goal. Historian Gordon Wood says at first, the United States was more like the European Union is today.
 
"When Jefferson said 'my country,' he meant Virginia. When John Adams said 'my country,' he meant Massachusetts."
 
This meant that Congress could not order the states to do anything they did not want to do. Congress could not demand that the states provide money for the war. It could only ask for their help.
 
George Washington, the top general, could not draft men into the army. He could only wait for the states to send them. Washington showed that he was a good politician by the way he kept Congress and the thirteen states supporting him throughout the war.
 
Just as Americans did not all agree about the war, the British people did not agree about it either. Many supported the government's decision to fight. They believed that the war was necessary to rescue loyalists from the patriots. Others did not think Britain should fight the Americans, because the Americans had not invaded or threatened their country. They believed that Britain should leave the colonies alone to do as they wished.  
 
King George was not able to do this, however. He supported the war as a way to continue his power in the world, and to rescue British honor in the eyes of other national leaders.
 
Whichever side British citizens were on, there was no question that the war was causing severe problems in Britain. British businessmen could no longer trade with the American colonies. Prices increased.  Taxes did, too. And young men were forced to serve in the Royal Navy.
 
At the start of the war, the British believed that the rebellion was led by a few extremists in New England. They thought the other colonies would surrender if that area could be surrounded and controlled. So they planned to separate New England from the other colonies by taking control of the Hudson River Valley.
 
The British changed their plans after they were defeated in the Battle of Saratoga in New York state. Historian Gordon Wood says the British loss changed the nature of the war.
 
"The French feel at this point that the Americans might make it, and therefore they throw in their support. Once the French come on board, then the British are really panicked. At that point they offer the Americans everything the Americans had wanted, save independence, but it was too late."
 
The British experienced many problems fighting the war. Their troops were far from home, across a wide ocean. It was difficult to bring in more troops and supplies. Gordon Wood says the distance across the Atlantic was one reason the British lost the war.
 
"Even though they were the most powerful nation in the world, had a superb army, and of course completely controlled the seas. And they were dealing with the ragtag army of George Washington and a bunch of militia, and they couldn't do it."
 
General Washington's army had its own problems, too. Congress never had enough money. States often did not do what they were supposed to do. And citizens were not always willing to fight. Soldiers were poorly trained and would promise to serve for only a year or so.
 
The political and economic developments of the American Revolution concerned not just the Americans and the British. European nations were watching the events in America very closely. Those events, and the reactions in Europe, will be our story next week.
 
You can find our series online with transcripts, MP3s, podcasts and pictures at voaspecialenglish.com. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter at VOA Learning English. I'm Steve Ember, inviting you to join us again next week for THE MAKING OF A NATION -- American history in VOA Special English.
_____

This was program #13
This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
12/03/2012 5:42 AM
Now, I noticed that the Stars and Stripes is drawn in the illustration demonstrating the scene of surrender at the battle in Saratoga. I wonder when on earth the falg was enacted as an American national flag ?


by: BIJU.P.Y. from: SOUTH INDIA
12/02/2012 4:24 PM
Oh! How much hardships the British have brought to other nations around the world. I often wonder whether the present Britishers are the straight descendants of their cruel ancestors. Whatever cruel tricks have they played to capture power and maintain it. How many human lives have been sacrificed for the establishment of their supremecy. But God sees the truth but waits is true and applicable in the case of Britan too. Thank you.


by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
12/02/2012 9:57 AM
Thank you very much VOA for an interesting story again. Now I feel I could understand why this war is called American Revolution in the U.S. not simply Independence War like in Britain. At that time, people in America were not necessarily united against Britain for independence. There lived native Indians, white colonists and black slaves, and they had different interests each other even among white colonists.

George Washington and civilian militants could be said they fought not only Britain but part of peer colonists who were with vested interests or timid people. This war had an aspect of civillian war, deserving called Revolution, to determine which system colonists choice, in a sense reliable monarchy or democracy what it really is had been yet to known.


by: shao xz from: usa
12/01/2012 3:12 AM
no mp3 can be download?

In Response

by: Moderator
12/01/2012 9:11 PM
Please right-click on the words "high-quality 192 kbps audio" in the opening sentence, and select "Save Link As."


by: Rick from: Italy
11/29/2012 10:02 AM
I don't understand why an important experts as Gordon Wood equalize the first american colonies with european union today. The countries of European Union are not inolved in any war with any mother country. All that countries speak different languages and has different stories and cultures. Nothing in common. Is not possible to compare the first 13 american colonies with european union. Bye bye

In Response

by: Slavek from: Poland
12/05/2012 3:55 PM
You are right. The biggest difference between EU and american colonies is approach to the freedom. Amarica is regarded as a home of freedom while EU is our new dictator with thousands of stupid rules and huge bureaucracy.

In Response

by: alicia
11/30/2012 10:40 PM
Hi, it's just an example, i understand it means when American say country, they mean their state; and every one in EU thinks always only their own country, not the whole Europe.

In Response

by: Rick from: Italy
12/10/2012 7:12 AM
Hi Alicia,
the United States is much more important than every single state of the nation for american people. It is normal that there are attachment to the customs and traditions of one's own town or federal state but the nation is United State of America. Only one nation. That's the reason why Usa did not separate itself during centuries and still has strong national unity today.

In Response

by: Alicia from: Germany
11/30/2012 9:53 PM
who cares!
as a female i don't care so much about it

In Response

by: james from: sarajevo
11/30/2012 2:01 PM
You dont must to know other lenguage to have cammon interest or aim.When you see someone on street was hurt,you and all other people who witness that accident or disaster,will run to help that universe(human being)becouse when you think that one day you can have possibility same disaster and you will surrely except to have samo help from others people.Dont matter what language they spoke or have they look...

In Response

by: Tri Nguyen from: USA
11/30/2012 10:39 AM
I agree with you Rick,
Anyway, it's very interesting and I'm so proud to be an American today. (legally immigrated from Vietnam in 1975)

Learn with The News

  • Brazil Religion in Latin America

    Audio Latin America Catholics Converting to Protestants

    Almost 40 percent of the world’s Catholic population, or about 425 million people, lives in Latin America. But a recent study from the Pew Research Center says people in Latin America have increasingly lost faith in the Catholic Church. Membership has decreased as much as 20 percent. More

  • This undated handout image provided by Science and the University of Tokyo shows infectious particles of the avian H7N9 virus emerging from a cell.

    Audio What's the Matter?

    From the very big to the very small, everything in our universe is made up of matter. Matter is one of those very hardworking words that you need to master ... no matter what. We will get you to the hear of the matter with this Words and Their Stories. More

  • Cambodia's Prime Minister Hun Sen (L) stretches to shake hands with China's President Xi Jinping before a meeting at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, November 7, 2014. REUTERS/Jason Lee/POOL

    Audio Cambodian Opposition Criticize Dependence on Chinese Aid

    China’s government recently promised more than $500 million in aid to Cambodia. Cambodian officials say they need about $1 billion in foreign aid each year to operate the government. Opposition members are worried about the country becoming too dependent on aid money from China. More

  • Obama Immigration

    Video Republicans Promise to Fight Obama on Immigration

    Republican Party lawmakers are promising to fight President Barack Obama’s executive order on immigration. The order protects millions of people who have been living in the United States illegally. The president’s announcement immediately angered Republicans in the U.S. Congress. More

  • A worker at state-owned Pertamina, the country's main retailer of subsidised fuel, fills a vehicle at a petrol station in Jakarta November 17, 2014. Indonesia's president raised the price of subsidised gasoline and diesel by more than 30 percent on Monday

    Audio Indonesians Protest Rising Fuel Prices

    Indonesian President Joko Widodo announced the government would cut the financial support on fuel. The move led to a 30 percent increase in fuel overnight. These rising prices have led some public transportation groups to go on strike. The government has had to prepare other forms of transportation. More

Featured Stories

  • Jonathan Evans Performs with Bonerama

    Video With Bonerama, Three Trombones Lead the Big Parade

    The New Orleans-based group brings together funk, rock, blues and jazz, creating a gumbo for the ears. Bonerama has horns like many bands. But, unlike most groups, the trombone players lead this band. Reporter Jonathan Evans performed with the band and wrote about it for American Mosaic. More

  • A line from Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address is displayed at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC.

    Audio Lincoln's Words at Gettysburg Still Have Meaning

    On November 19, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln said no one would remember his speech at a battlefield cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. But Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address remains one of the most important speeches in U.S. history. More

  • PLASTIC DREAMS

    Audio Surgery Safaris: Looking for the Perfect Body

    Many people these days are going as far as South Africa to get their version of perfection. People from across Africa and the world come for so-called “surgery safaris.” There are no animals to see on these safaris. The visitors instead look for smaller stomachs, firmer bottoms or perhaps new eye. More

  • Video South Korea Attempting to Reuse More E-Waste

    South Korea is dealing with increasing amounts of waste from electronic devices. These useless or unwanted parts are often called “e-waste.” . The city of Seoul throws out about 10 tons of e-waste each year. Some local governments in South Korea are creating special "e-waste" recycling programs. More

  • FILE - Brittany Maynard, shown with her Great Dane puppy, Charlie, took a lethal dose of medication prescribed by a doctor in Oregon on Saturday. Maynard was battling brain cancer.

    Video Should You Have the Right to Die?

    The recent case of a 29 year old woman with brain cancer has again raised questions about the right to die. Americans are divided on whether doctors should be able to give deathly sick patients drugs to end their lives. Only four U.S states permit doctor, or physician, assisted suicide. More

Practice Your Writing

Confessions of an English Learner BlogConfessions of an English Learner Blog

Tell us About Our Programs