October 25, 2014 00:32 UTC

Science & Technology

To Protect Rhinos, Anti-Poaching Business Grows in South Africa

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Members of the Pilanesberg National Park Anti-Poaching Unit (APU) stand guard as conservationists and police investigate the scene of a rhino poaching incident in South Africa, April 19, 2012.
Members of the Pilanesberg National Park Anti-Poaching Unit (APU) stand guard as conservationists and police investigate the scene of a rhino poaching incident in South Africa, April 19, 2012.

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From VOA Learning English, this is the Agriculture Report in Special English.
 
Some private game farmers in South Africa are hiring armed protection for their rhinos. New security companies are being started to fight an increase in rhinoceros poaching.
 
Poachers are now well-armed and well-financed. A single horn sells for than $65,000 per kilogram -- more valuable than gold. Rhino horns are sold mostly in Vietnam and China, on the false belief that they can cure all kinds of problems.
 
Simon Rood started a security company in South Africa five years ago, when rhino poaching started to increase. Today, his 35 rangers supervise an area of 150,000 hectares in Limpopo province.
 
Simon Rood was a soldier in the South African army, and gives military training to his rangers. He says they have never lost a rhino to poaching. This, he says, is because his rangers patrol 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and live and sleep in the bush.
 
"24/7, they've got to live in the bush, 24/7 the guys patrolling. Obviously the guys are moving around. You've only got so many people on the ground. but you've got area coverage. They're moving from area to area."
 
Callie Botha manages a lodge that had six rhinos. Recently he found one dead, with its horns cut off. He owned the rhino for 12 years.
 
"I fed it every day. He was part of the family."
 
Replacing a rhino costs about $28,000. But Callie Botha says armed protection also costs a lot, and he worries about his own safety. So he may stop breeding rhinos.
 
"The risk is too high."
 
But others are willing to pay. Stephen Leonard owns an eco-lodge for nature travelers. He started using the security service after an incident at the beginning of the year.
 
"In end of January, we had an instance where people came inside the property and they tracked down rhinos."
 
He did not lose any rhinos but decided to increase security.
 
"The poachers are heavily armed, and we are not, so we'd rather get people that are armed to come and do the anti-poaching for us."
 
Karen Trendler works at South Africa's only rhino orphanage. She says increasing security is important. But, like Simon Rood, she thinks there should be a law to establish rules for training.
 
"If the security companies are not well-trained, there is always the risk of corruption."
 
She says a long-term solution will come through education and law enforcement. She says Yemen is an example of a country that has stopped buying rhino horn.
 
"The rhino horn was used for ceremonial daggers. And there was a huge demand for rhino horn. And through a very, very well coordinated and aggressive awareness project, linked with good law enforcement, that demand has been reduced completely."
 
Poaching of endangered animals in Africa is growing. You can find a series of stories about poaching at voanews.com. And that's the VOA Special English Agriculture Report. I'm Karen Leggett.
 __

Contributing: Emilie Iob
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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Ramin from: Azerbaijan Baku
12/07/2012 8:31 AM
Its bad business every year died many animals in the world if it will continue maybe the history about the dinozavr would be repeat.


by: Leo from: Colombia
12/06/2012 2:26 AM
I think security is important but more than that, awareness and education has a deeper impact, as you are attacking directly the demand, without demand it will be finally stopped.


by: dora qu from: china
12/06/2012 12:54 AM
why is not there the links to dowload PDF?


by: BIJU.P.Y. from: SOUTH INDIA
12/05/2012 4:37 PM
Poachers are black sheeps who cross all borders of law and decency. Their greed for money will put the least rational adult to shame. True that money is the root of all evil. They lease their morality in their hunt for money. Strict laws should be enforced upon them to discipline them. Otherwise their next target will be humans! Thank you.


by: Bob Milton from: Beijing, China
12/05/2012 8:07 AM
In addition to ways in education and laws, a direct solution to protect worldwide endangered animals is that private sectors carry out protection while governments provide needed financial support. Thus, animals are protected, private sectors can earn profit and more people get jobs.


by: Mai Nguyen from: Vietnam
12/05/2012 6:35 AM
It's so sad that Vietnam is a very poor country but having the highest rate of buying rhino horns from Africa. They believe that rhino horns can cure all kinds of problem, that's so funny.


by: Mr.Jakkapan Potipan from: THAILAND
12/04/2012 1:09 PM
In Thailand some poachers are the grouping of police, soldier, politician and other influential person in social. Though, Thai society have any more regulation and conversation law for preserves wildlife, but the government officer need great benefit more ecological values. The preservation of wildlife can't help and prevention the killing game from people which mostly selfish more than social benefit.


by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
12/04/2012 6:18 AM
I have some questions about this story. First, what are private game farmers? Second, what is the purpose of breeding rhinoceros? Is it permitted for citizens to own rhinoceros in South Africa? Is it also permitted for private security companies to use fire? Poaching rhino horns is not a crime? Guarding rhinoceros from being poached is not a task of police?

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