November 28, 2014 09:33 UTC

Science & Technology

3-D Goes From Movies To Real World

3-D will take you from New York to California without getting on a plane | TECHNOLOGY REPORT

3D Leaps From Movies To Real World
3D Leaps From Movies To Real World

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From VOA Learning English, this is the Technology Report.
 
Movie fans know that their action hero Superman does not really fly. And, in the movie Superman Returns, another visual trick is played on viewers. The man they see flying is not real. He is what is called a virtual actor. The first step in creating this digital actor is to have a real person stand in a room called a light stage. A computer then captures the outlines and shapes of his face and records how they throw off light. Paul Debevec is with the Institute for Creative Technologies at the University of Southern California.
 
“We can light them with very specially computer-controlled illumination and take photos of them from seven different viewpoints with high resolution digital still cameras.”
 
Mr. Debevec is part of a team working to create computerized images of people, objects and environments that look and act real. The light stage permits actors to be turned into digital versions of themselves much like the blue creatures in the movie Avatar. The real world could soon be using a similar technology. Computer experts at the Institute are developing a 3-D video teleconferencing system. It would send a video image of a person into a meeting room. That image would be able to work with the people in the room, who would  see it in 3-D without special eyeglasses. Paul Debevec says:
 
“The person who is being transmitted to a remote location can actually look around at the people in the room and everybody in that room knows who they’re looking at. And that’s such a fundamental part of human communication.”
 
He believes the business world will begin to use 3-D video teleconferencing in the next five years.
         
The Institute is using its light stage and Interactive 3-D Display technology to record video testimonies of Holocaust survivors for the Shoah Foundation.

"Do you remember any  songs from your youth?"

"This is a lullaby that my mother used to sing to me and I still remember it. It's in polish."

The Foundation is also at the University of Southern California. The 3-D images will be shown on special screens in classrooms or museums and will be set up to answer questions about the Holocaust from students and visitors.
 
“It could be about faith. It could be about love. It could be about beliefs. It could be about identity.”
 
Kim Simon is managing director of the Shoah Foundation.
 
“It’s also a medium with which young people today are particularly comfortable. And, the amount of information that comes through seeing a person’s face and hearing their voice at the same time is multiplied.”
 
A demonstration of an interaction between a Holocaust survivor and students may be possible in a year. In 10 years, we may be able to play 3-D video games without special glasses.
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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Anastasia from: Russia
04/11/2013 10:00 AM
It's great!
I want to see some 3-D computer monitors like in the movies Iron man with Robert Downey Jr:)


by: Marcelo Cruz from: Brazil
04/10/2013 10:51 AM
I love 3-D but, I don't like to use glasses! This is amazing technology!


by: Anonymous
04/09/2013 1:16 PM
I am confused about the new 3-D technology. It means that the audience watch the show on the spot, or some other ways?


by: Tuan from: Saigon, VN
04/09/2013 11:36 AM
Technology is getting more and more advanced with multiple kinds of new creations.

Maybe, based on this 3-D video technology, we can create and see real images of our game characters in real life, especially, girls of Final Fantasy.


by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
04/09/2013 8:12 AM
Wonderful! Better we can touch 3-Ds!

In Response

by: Marcelo Cruz from: Brazil
04/10/2013 10:55 AM
Yeah. When we can touch 3d, it will be unbelievable! I hope that I can see it in few years.


by: BIJU.P.Y. from: SOUTH INDIA
04/08/2013 3:45 PM
3D display technology will be soon on the stage, around the world. It will have special effect on spectators. It will have a wonderful effect on them, indeed.

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