October 24, 2014 18:49 UTC

Health Report

Using a Mobile Phone to Improve Mother and Child Health

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MAMA seeks to improve mother and child health through mobile phone messages
MAMA seeks to improve mother and child health through mobile phone messages

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  • Using a Mobile Phone to Improve Mother and Child Health

From VOA Learning English, this is the Health Report in Special English.
 
Different groups around the world are working to expand the uses for mobile technology in health care. Patricia Mechael is executive director of an organization called the mHealth Alliance.
 
"In the world, there are six billion mobile phone subscriptions in a population of seven billion people. And the most rapidly growing markets are those in developing countries. Africa, as a continent, you have widespread adoption, where three or four years ago the penetration rates were 20 percent or 30 percent, and now they're getting upwards of 60 percent in some countries."
 
She says a lot of work is being done to use mobile technology for mother and child health.
 
"Earlier work had been to look at mobile technologies and HIV and AIDS. And so we have some great evidence on the use of mobile for things like treatment adherence and compliance and care management."
 
More than 4,000 people from 50 countries have been meeting near Washington this week. The meeting is the fourth annual mHealth Summit. It brings together experts from what the organizers call the mHealth ecosystem. This includes nongovernmental organizations, governments and the technology industry.
 
In 2011 Secretary of State Hillary Clinton launched a public/private partnership called the Mobile Alliance for Maternal Action, or MAMA. It includes the U.S. Agency for International Development, the Johnson & Johnson company, the United Nations Foundation and the mHealth Alliance. Kirsten Gagnaire is the global director of MAMA.
 
"There's about 800 women a day globally, and about three million babies every year, that die from pregnancy and childbirth-related causes."
 
She says the MAMA program sends messages to mobile phones to educate women about their health.
 
"We have a set of messages that cover pregnancy and the first year of a baby's life."
 
She says health messages may also be sent to a pregnant woman's husband and mother-in-law, for example. That way they too can understand what needs to be done.
 
Patricia Mechael of the mHealth Alliance says messages can be text or voicemail.
 
"For example, you can have a pregnant woman in Bangladesh registered into a system that provides messages that are timed to her pregnancy that can help her know what to do, when to do certain things. And then when to go in for specific treatment issues, or prevention care like immunizations and that sort of thing."
 
Even simple text messages can be important sources of information to people without Internet access. And Kirsten Gagnaire of the Mobile Alliance for Maternal Health says even online users may not understand all the information available.
 
"You have to be able to read through thousands of entries that come back to you on Google, for example, and then figure out what that information means to you. And that's not something that someone in a poor, illiterate or semi-literate kind of situation can do."
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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: AmirDewani from: Miami-FL-USA.
12/07/2012 9:05 AM
This is an excellent idea. However I wonder about the areas of the world where there is illiteracy and poverty in the interior of the third world countries in particular. I hope they must be evolving some solutions so that the concerned mother may en-cash the information provided on mobile phones. In my opinion the major concern is money to buy the suggested medicine and get timely interpretation of the information, because information, howsoever important, has to be converted into real action. Yet it must be said the MAMA initiative is excellent.


by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
12/07/2012 2:56 AM
It's great information about peri-pregnancy health care is delivered to be timed to pregnancy to mothers, husbands and even to mothers-in-law. I wonder if these information through mobile phones are delivered according to the user's application or sent automatically from medical staff or officials. This system must be useful even in developed countries because mobile phones are penetrated throughout the population and first of all handy.


by: Johnny from: Cartagena, Colombia
12/06/2012 9:33 PM
This is an excellent innovation that can help a lot of people around the world.


by: mehran from: india
12/06/2012 5:19 PM
technology is good if we can use it in right way. important things for human beings is health. in the past some events such as accident in the way, pregnancy and so on create the problem for people but now with cell phone you can inform and take help as soon as possible also with healthy news you can prevention of some diseases of course the government should pay subsidies for helping to poor people that don't have money for using technology.


by: BIJU.P.Y. from: SOUTH INDIA
12/06/2012 4:42 PM
Thank you. The invention of mobile is a revolutionary invention by man. Messages of the right kind can do wonders esp. when at and during the time of pregnancy. Such hep will be very useful to them. Thank you.


by: cebrail from: ankara
12/06/2012 3:14 PM
very good idea for non developed country.

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